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In Search Of The Best Rugs For Kids And Pets That Are Still Actually Cozy – And The 4 Rugs We Keep Coming Back To (Guess What They Have In Common???)

I’m still furnishing the rental to be cozy and inviting but TRYING to buy for the farm at the same time – nothing temporary unless we need it here to live but won’t need it there (like bar stools). So I’ve been on the hunt for what I feel like we all want in a rug: comfortable and cozy, durable and long-lasting, sustainable, forgiving (or should I say “FURgiving” to mud/dirt/hair and wear and tear), and obviously kid-friendly. We are low-maintenance people, folks. While we have started taking our shoes off inside (Oregon, duh) I still don’t want to have to worry.

If you’ve ever shopped for area rugs you know that this comfortable + durable + affordable + stylish combo is extremely hard to find, if not impossible. PLUS I want to buy responsibly so I’m vintage hunting FIRST. And when you add in “vintage” it makes my universal mom quest for a rug that can withstand legos and puke even harder. So today I’m going to walk you through all the types of rugs I’ve debated and ranked the categories from MY experience.

photo by tessa neustadt | from: experimenting in my living room: trying to find “the” rug

Before I get too far into this – truly the durability of the rug depends on its materials and craftsmanship – a hand-dyed and woven rug from Turkey will likely be superior to one that is mass manufactured in a factory. And frankly, the price will give you a good indication of its quality (for new rugs at least). And when it comes to sustainability – well, the category of rug doesn’t have anything to do with its sustainability – it’s who, how, from what, and where that it’s made. All rugs can be made of all materials. Generally woven cotton won’t last as long, a wool blend will last the longest, stay far away from viscose and silk – so pretty, but even water will stain it.

The High Pile Shag

photo by tessa neustadt | from: our master bedroom – finally

Now I’ve used this rug above more than 3 times because it’s like walking on a cloud. But this was before dogs and honestly, I can’t imagine a fluffy white rug working in Oregon (plus it’s no longer available – we kept the one at the mountain house + sold the one in LA to the new owners). But let’s break it down ANYWAY: Coziness – 10, FURgiving/Kid-friendly – 6, durability for high traffic – 4. If you want a big fluffy rug like this you are basically getting another piece of furniture – it can be the most fought-over spot in the room. I LOVE these in bedrooms or TV rooms, and wish I could have them in every room but A. They do not pass the “tiny lego/barf and crumb test”, and B. The yarn CAN get packed down and show “the path” if it’s in a walkway or high traffic zone. I’ve had some that didn’t, but most of my “long-haired” rugs got matted where it got the most foot traffic. It’s actually fine if it’s all over (and can be revived with a steam clean), but a bummer when you can see the path.

charlie and his still best friend sabine at 1 1/2 | photo by kelsey tucker | from: a modern glam nursery makeover

Good news – due to the shadows amongst the high pile it can actually hide dirt/stains way longer than I would have thought especially if it’s evenly distributed wear and tear. In fact, it hides even better than a short low-cut pile rug where it might be more obvious to have a “spill”. The one above is from my friend’s house and she bought it for $8k 10 years ago and it still looks EXCELLENT. The shag rugs I’ve bought have been cheaper (still around $1k – $3K) and they showed more wear and tear faster – more matting at the foot of the bed or side where it got far more foot traffic. We recently rotated the one at the mountain house bedroom and it looks great now, but just know that some super high piles like this can get matted with consistent foot traffic.

1. Natural Greek Flokati Area Rug | 2. Auckland Natural Wool Shag Rug | 3. nuLOOM Hand-woven Flokati Wool Shag Area Rug | 4. Bello Rug | 5. Tegan Moroccan Shag Rug | 6. Moroccan Diamond Brown Indoor Outdoor Rug

The Flatweave (Kilim Or Durrie)

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: 14 rules for how we style the perfect bedroom (+ 3 new reveals)
photo by david tsay | from: styled: secrets for arranging rooms, from tabletops to bookshelves

Coziness – 4, Pet/Kidfriendly – 7 to 8 (depends on the colorway), Durability – 9. On their own flatweaves aren’t terribly cozy as they are woven horizontal versus the yarn pulling up and fluffing out. However, with my memory foam hack (my favorite rug pad) they can be super cushion-y with 1/4 inch of memory foam for you to sit on. While originally not Brian’s favorite, once the pad is added it’s an absolute game-changer. So I’m still open to these knowing that the carpet pad absolutely makes a difference. New ones are easy to find, vintage or antique are all over the internet but if you are picky about size and color (me! me!) then it can be a challenge. But they hide a lot and don’t have a lot of fur in which to fish your dogs puke out of.

photo by laure joliet | from: a kid-friendly, baby proof yet stylish living room, ohjoy 2.0.

I used one 12 years ago for Joy’s living room and I just texted her to see what her review was for two kids and two cats (in their main family room) and she said that with spills and cat puke she would just use a steam cleaner and it came out (which would be way harder with a shag rug).

1. Lemieux Et Cie | 2. Reed Grey White Stripe Rug | 3. Classic | 4. Gunnjona | 5. Lemieux et Cie Flatwoven Manette Rug | 6. Copper With White Stripe Rug | 7. Lemieux et Cie Handwoven Tukar Rug | 8. Anni Rug | 9. Brown And Cream Striped Rug | 10. Vintage Turkish Hemp Rug | 11. Canyon Kilim Woven Rug | 12. Jonathan Adler Inkdrop Lapis Blue Rug

The Traditional Persian Style Rug

photo by tessa neustadt | from: our modern english tudor living room

Coziness – 7, Pet/Kid-friendly – 10, Durability – 10. Hands down the most durable of them all. This is a huge category and could be its own post as it spans many styles, continents, and centuries. It’s art on the floor and when right can absolutely MAKE your room. I have found that Persian rugs hide almost everything and obviously the darker and busier they are the better. I use them for entry rugs since there is SO much outside shoe traffic.

I even have one in my kitchen that I’m sure is disgusting but it still looks GREAT. My only issue with these is that I’m so picky with color/pattern and it’s extremely hard to find allover color ones in blues/greens or pinks which is what I want. I don’t love a strong dark border. It’s like they can either be too busy/loud for me or they can be a wee bit too “modern farmhouse” predictable. All I want in the world is a 9×12 version of my entry rug below, which is proving to be IMPOSSIBLE to find – I’ve been trying FOR YEARS.

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: styling to sell – the final entry reveal (that’s real estate agent approved)

I once found one that I wanted from Mansour Modern and when I called to “request price” it was $150,000 – yes, the cost of a home. They are both everywhere and nowhere and I recently scoured our post about “where to find antique and vintage rugs online” if you are interested. Ultimately I’ve found the best ones randomly, like underneath a bunch of stuff at a booth in an antique mall and totally filthy – but actually affordable.

I once bought an overdyed vintage Persian rug from Rejuvenation’s vintage site (below) and it was also super kid-friendly (we ended using it in the basement). Here’s what many dealers are doing now – they take 1980s bright Persian rugs that aren’t as popular (and might be cheaper) and they shave them down to look “worn” and then desaturate the color or dye them a new color. Like so:

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: our guest room/office basement suite reveal

I’m neither fully into this or fully opposed to it – totally depends on the rug pattern, etc and I did really like mine above. And listen, I do appreciate that it’s getting a new life, while still being really durable and easy to hide stains.

1. 8’3 x 11′ Antique Persian Tabriz Rug | 2. Aschraf | 3. Idalina | 4. Antique Persian Hamedan Rug | 5. Aleah Rug | 6. 8’2 x 11’9 Antique Persian Mahal Rug

The Berber/Moroccan (Contemporary And Vintage)

design by brady tolbert for ehd | photo by tessa neustadt | from: brady’s living room refresh with the citizenry

Moroccan rugs (new or vintage) tend to be not as high pile as the shag, but still with ample plushness. Cozy level – 9.5, Kid/Pet-friendly – 8 (depends on color-way) and durability – 8 to 10 (depending on color-way). I LOVE a Moroccan rug, both in style and coziness. They can be simple and neutral or wild and colorful. So even if your style isn’t bohemian (are we still saying that?) there is a Moroccan rug for you. It’s more the technique, the durability, the wool pile that they all have in common (and per usual, the ones actually made in Morocco are the best quality).

1. Boundaries | 2. Speck Black Hand-Knotted Wool Rug | 3. 022 | 4. Checkered Beni Ourain Rug | 5. Balance | 6. Jutland Geo Moroccan Hand-Tufted Shag Area Rug | 7. 026 | 8. Contemporary Moroccan Rug | 9. Soukie Modern Vintage Moroccan Mercer Rug | 10. Soukie Modern Vintage Moroccan Willa Rug | 11. Reda Vintage Moroccan Rug | 12. Eliko Rugs Vintage Moroccan 57931 Rug

The Hide

photo by tessa neustadt | from: how to add style to a neutral living room

Coziness level – 2, Pet/Kid-friendly – 10, Durability – 10. While I do question the sourcing these days (this is an animal), I will say that when we had this rug it was ALMOST indestructible (also no longer available). Wine, Coffee, Ketchup – all would EASILY wipe off. I would still buy a vintage hide rug if I saw one at the antique mall or flea market (great under a pedestal dining table), but I don’t feel so good about buying new unless I knew for sure how it was being sourced. This one would get some “bald patches” in VERY high traffic over the 5 years we had it. Ultimately if you want a SOLID white rug in your living room and you have kids and pets, this is a good option (and I’m excited about exploring the vegan options).

1. Handmade Studio Leather Dorotheia Modern Leather Rug | 2. Cowhide Rug | 3. Real Cowhide Rug Salt&Pepper Tricolor | 4. Tetra Pieced Hide Rug | 5. Ivory Printed Faux Cowhide Area Rug | 6. Scallop Black Hide Rug

The Sisal Or Natural Fiber

photo by tessa neustadt | from: mel’s living room reveal
photo by david tsay | from: styled: secrets for arranging rooms, from tabletops to bookshelves

There are two types of people in the world – those that like the feeling of sisal underfoot and those who very much DO NOT. I’m fine with it in certain areas, but I think no one would say these are “cozy” and as you can imagine Brian is very “ANTI-SISAL”). Sisals/Jutes, etc have a time and place for sure – I’ve often layered them under vintage rugs that are on the slightly “too small” side (see above). But only some are pet-friendly (cats can scratch, dogs puke gets stuck inside). I sound like I’m not a fan, but I am – they are classic, affordable, and totally unoffensive. But no, not cozy and just generally hard to get excited about. (If you know of a really durable or comfortable sisal in the comments please let us know – it’s not like I’ve tried every single one and below are some options to look at).

1. Luru Woven Jute Rug | 2. Jasper Jute Rug | 3. Jute Wave | 4. Redick Handmade Tufted Jute/Sisal Beige Area Rug | 5. Riverton Striped Jute/Wool Area Rug | 6. Cassia Woven Jute Rug | 7. Georgia Ombre Black Jute Rug | 8. Reseda Hand Woven Striped Jute Cotton Area Rug | 9. Bryn Jute Rug

The Cut Pile Rug

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: from: a quick update: the changes i’ve made to my la living room

Coziness – 8-9, Kid/Pet-friendly – 7, durability – 10 if high quality. A “cut pile” is where it’s looped and then cut, so it’s shorter than a shag, but longer than like a flatwoven. I would definitely use the word “plush”. Generally, I’ve found them to be really, really great – when made well. The one I have above (which I have now in our rental living room) is SO COMFORTABLE but we bought it before we had dogs and the mud/dirt is more of a problem than I had hoped. I even got that eco stain repellant applied to it for like $300 when I bought it which I felt did very little. All in all though, the dirt is coming out just fine (the pee is another story).

1. Baxter Indigo Wool Rug | 2. Keen Handknotted Viscose Silver Rug | 3. Kelly Rug | 4. Agra | 5. Taylor Hand Tufted Wool Rug | 6. Parker Neutral Wool Rug

Here’s The Deal

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: reveal: our boy/girl, 2-twin bed shared kids room

Blue Rug (unavailable)

I mean the long and short of it is the more variation in color the easier it is to hide, full stop. It’s not necessarily about being “dark” because we had a dark blue rug once and it collected and showed our kids and pups blonde hair (and dust) really easily. It’s when the yarns of the rug vary, not being totally solid – that is what is the most forgiving.

So what will we decide? I honestly think that it will be a mix, totally depending on the functional needs of the room the color palette, who will be using it, and honestly just what I find out vintage shopping.

So far I’ve pulled the trigger on two vintage Moroccan rugs on Etsy – these two:

They were both super affordable – 8×10, one $450, and one $600. Right now we need rugs in most rooms so while I’m unsure where they are going here or at the farm, I like them and could throw them many places.

I will also keep shopping for the right Persian rug – likely vintage for now. Lastly, I keep coming back to all the new rugs that I’ve owned and loved for years that seriously check all the boxes – cozy, soft, with enough variety in colors to mask dirt/stains and be kid and dog friendly.

Checkered Rug

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: the living room reveal

Moroccan-Inspired Rug

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: one of emily’s best friends gets the cozy yet sophisticated bedroom makeover she really deserves

Handknotted Rug

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: reveal: how we brightened up a room (and some deserving lives) with velux skylights

Moroccan-Inspired Rug

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: emily bowser’s “refreshed for function” small living room makeover

Rug (unavailable)

Opening Image Credits: Photo by Sara Ligorria-Tramp | From: See How EHD Brings Fall Into Our Homes (And Yes, There Are *Chic* Pumpkins Involved … Target Does It Again)

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Emily
10 days ago

Pro tip: get a rug rake for your Moroccan rugs now that you have doggos in the house. They help so much with shedding – both of the dog and rug variety (though I’m guessing you won’t have an issue with your rugs shedding since they are vintage). I had THAT West Elm rug for a number of years and even when I would break the rules and vacuum using the beater bar, there would still be endless amounts of dog fur trapped in the fibers. A rug rake was the only way to get it out.

Also, beware if your dogs aren’t completely house broken. When we got our second pup, he obviously had a few accidents on the rug, like he did on every other rug and carpet in the house. I don’t know if we could just never get the scent out or if he thought it was like grass or something, but for months after he was potty trained, he would still sneak off into the room with that rug and go to the bathroom. We finally just gave up and replaced the rug. Good luck on the continued rug hunt!

DeniseGK
8 days ago
Reply to  Emily

Are you talking about those things that are a rubber “rake” on one side and a squeegee on the other? I have one and they are great for more than just pet hair. I used to be the only person in the house with long hair and there was always some hair on the floor. Now, bc of how we, personally, are dealing with the pandemic, there are 5 people with long hair. It’s a hairmageddon. Luckily, I had the carpet rake for the one room that still had the awful “twist” style wall-to-wall carpet from the previous owners. I tried in on the wood floors too and it works great! It also gathers dust and dirt really well so I can just hit the pile with the vacuum hose. Mine has a telescoping handle that I absolutely take advantage of. It was about $50, which was more than I expected, but I now feel it was money well spent.

Erica
9 days ago

I have the BEST rug and everyone needs to know about it! Haha – I bought this rug for a tile living room that we have and was a little nervous about the color but was in love with the pattern so I bought it anyway. I have a very dirty dog and a toddler, but it magically hides most dirt/spills. Coffee, orange juice, and mud have all been dragged all over this rug and you cannot tell!! Plus it’s super soft and fluffy without being a trip hazard. My husband has put a limit on my vintage rug buying, so this was a great solution that we are both happy with!

Ann
9 days ago

I bought a gorgeous vintage 8 x 10 Persian rug from an estate sale for $150. The children of the homeowner were running the sale and didn’t know what it was worth – they just wanted to get rid of it (obviously it wasn’t their style). The colors are bold – red, black, pink with white and light green thrown in for good measure – so I had to rethink our living room design to make it work. Sometimes I wish it was a more muted but for the price and the quality, I can’t complain. They are hands down the most durable rugs!

Angela
7 days ago
Reply to  Ann

I wish people could post photos! I would love to see your rug.

StephanieZ
9 days ago

I love moroccan rugs, but with a great dane I can never get one. Every once in a blue moon he has an upset stomach when I’m not home. That shit, literally, will never come out of carpet that thick.

Cassandra
9 days ago

Please tell me how you plan to clean these rugs! We have wasted so much money on rugs over the years because it is so hard to get pee out of them. Worst experience? We had a sisal rug thinking it would be durable. Did you know that diaper cream has fish oil in it? Our dog did! And trust me that it is impossible to clean up vomited diaper cream out of sisal. (We called poison control and she was fine.) We have had antique rugs, cheap rugs, indoor/outdoor rugs… steam cleaning just never fully got the smell out. It’s easy to hide the visual evidence of accidents but not easy to rid rugs of the smell. Our older dogs passed away and so we risked buying nice rugs again. So far so good. But I am still on the hunt for a dining room rug that can withstand kids and dogs and food etc. maybe flor or ruggable really is the answer.

Eliot
9 days ago
Reply to  Cassandra

Buy a steamer! I have a polti vaporetto and it has a bajillion different attachments, including one for steaming rugs. I use it to clean virtually every surface in my house–floors, windows, upholstery–so that we hardly use cleaning products anymore. It has seriously paid for itself a dozen times over.

Kj
9 days ago
Reply to  Eliot

Very interested in a steam cleaner! Which one do you have?

Eliot
9 days ago
Reply to  Kj

I have a Polti Vaporetto Smart 40 (forgive the name of the retailer–it was the only non-Amazon source I could find) and I just love it. I’ve also used an upright Bissell steam mop, which was great, but really only for mopping floors.

Molly
9 days ago
Reply to  Eliot

Thank you! This is why I always read the comments. I can’t wait to try this on my rugs.

Lane
9 days ago
Reply to  Cassandra

Nature’s miracle (a lot of it) always worked for me on wool rugs as well as viscose (in an office). Sisal and Jute either show discoloration or get worn quickly around dogs. I was always able to clean up (dirt and smell) but some rugs become just slightly lighter in color from using cleaning solutions. The discoloration is not obvious on my patterned rugs. My wool rug is definitively worn from having puke on it in about 20 spots, but I still like it and prefer it to cheaper rugs or hard floor. Because I put so much effort into cleaning it. Wool doesn’t absorb water, but some dyes may get damaged.

kk
8 days ago
Reply to  Cassandra

I JUST started getting my vintage rugs professionally cleaned and its aa game changer… Much more affordable than I had thought .. However pee is very hard to remove …

Mkw
9 days ago

Three words: Flor carpet squares. Love them! Guess that’s five words…

Michelle
9 days ago

Gotta ask – did you try those new “Ruggable” rugs that are “washable”? Would LOVE a review on those!!!

Allison
9 days ago
Reply to  Michelle

I just got one and it’s super easy to clean! The large sizes don’t have a cushion pad option but I have three older dogs and need something washable. Great quality and fun patterns.

Eliot
9 days ago
Reply to  Allison

Ah, I’ve been wondering if the bigger sizes would fit into a standard washing machine.

mallory
9 days ago
Reply to  Michelle

I have a Ruggable in my kitchen and outside in a covered area (and we are in California so it never rains) and they are so awesome for these areas. I don’t know if I’d do them in a living room because they are definitely not plush. Curious about their shag collection though!

Courtney
9 days ago
Reply to  Michelle

I LOVE our Ruggable! We have 4 kids and 2 dogs. It is so cozy and stain resistant. I put it in the wash and it looks brand new clean! I am so ready to buy more.

michaela
8 days ago
Reply to  Michelle

I got a Ruggable for the entryway to/from our garage, and it’s been great. That’s also where we keep our cats’ litter box, and it stops them from tracking litter to the rest of the house, but it’s much easier to get the litter off of it than any of those specialty litter tracking mats we had before. The rug still looks clean between washings but that may be because I got a busier/vintage-distressed looking pattern. I agree with others that I probably wouldn’t want a Ruggable for my living room, because it’s not plush at all and it has an almost grippy, velvet-y texture that I don’t love on my bare feet. But I would definitely consider it for a dining room, where I feel like higher-pile rugs can be a hazard with scooting chairs in and out.

Claire
5 days ago
Reply to  Michelle

I have one in the living room and I really would not recommend it for a high traffic area. It definitely shows dirt and stains much quicker than a regular rug; and while yes I can just pull it up and wash it, it’s a real hassle to have someone help you move the furniture and wrangle a big rug until the washing machine. It also takes forever to dry, so you end up with no rug all day and the Velcro pad gets filled with dog hair. Maybe a small runner in the kitchen or hall would be fine, but not a big one in the living room that the dog rolls around on.

9 days ago

For the Jute/Sisal rugs – Ruggable has a Re-Jute line that actually looks nice. I have never bought one of their rugs but if I did it would be one from that line. I love a sisal rug but they are impossible to clean messes from.

Lane
9 days ago
Reply to  Laura Henry

How does ruggable feel? Is it a woven fabric?

Kelly
9 days ago
Reply to  Lane

Awful. They’re like a thin printed sueded fabric and I didn’t even have mine out of the box 3 minutes to know it was a hell no! Yuck.

A
9 days ago

I’ve gotten custom carpets made at carpet stores (the kind that do wall to wall carpet) and I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the selection. There are all sorts of patterned carpet with multiple colors, different textures, etc. Many of it is stain resistant. And it’s cheap (though there are definitely pricey wool options), I have a 10×12 that was $500 with a pad. It’s backed with a waterproof backing so I can use my handheld carpet cleaner machine with laundry sanitizer for emergencies without worrying about it bleeding through and ruining the wood floor. I wouldn’t go that route if you’re looking for a vintage oriental carpet equivalent but if you’ want a subtle pattern like many of the picks shown above it’s a great choice. And honestly vintage carpets can bleed if you try to clean them with water – personal experience.

Heather
9 days ago

I will never stop singing the praises of this jute rug from pottery barn: https://www.potterybarn.com/m/products/chunky-wool-jute-rug/. When people say they don’t like jute rugs, I make them come over and walk on this one. It is so comfy/soft and everyone’s favorite, and we now own two 9 x 12’s. It’s so good and easy to clean. We have four young children and two rescue dogs. Hands down the best.

Teresa
9 days ago
Reply to  Heather

Does it shed? I have a gorgeous jute rug (no wool included) that I had to banish to the basement because it sheds CONSTANTLY, even after 3 years of hard use.

Donna
9 days ago
Reply to  Heather

It’s beautiful! How does it handle dog puke? Does it stain?

Allison C
9 days ago
Reply to  Heather

I was coming here to recommend this rug too! We are on our 2nd, and our first lasted many years. It sheds a bit in the beginning but nothing super crazy.

Ana
9 days ago

Just scored 2 vintage rugs – absolutely love them, though maintenance will likely be challenging. One of them is originally made to be used as a tablecloth. The other – 100% wool, handwoven, organic dyes and very much a design over function choice. Just coudn’t resist is, fit right into the color palette. I agree, it’s so hard to find vintage rugs that are not red. We need 2 more rugs for the appartment, so this post is very helpful. Thanks!

Screenshot_20210914-114102_Facebook.jpg
Ana
9 days ago
Reply to  Ana

Here is the hand-woven treasure ♡

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Rae
9 days ago
Reply to  Ana

Both of these rugs are STUNNING!!!

Nora
9 days ago

Great post! I’m so glad you mentioned how durable (many) Persian carpets are, and how sisal rugs are pretty hard to clean – aligns with my experience, but doesn’t get highlighted that often, I think. In terms of finding a vintage Persian carpet, by the way, wondering if you’ve looked at Manhattan Rugs? I haven’t ordered from them, so I can’t recommend them directly, but just mentioning since they seem to have a lot of pretty 🙂

Kj
9 days ago
Reply to  Nora

Seagrass rugs are indestructible and very long lasting and cleanable. Sisal rugs stain like crazy and can’t be used in high traffic areas.

Ally
9 days ago
Reply to  Kj

I LOVE seagrass rugs, especially the fabric-trimmed kind, and agree that they hold up much better than sisal. Pottery Barn has stopped carrying my favorite seagrass rug except as a custom option. Any thoughts where I might find nice ones in 8 x 10 or 9 x 12?

Brianna
9 days ago

Thank you for this insightful post! Seriously perfect timing as a plan for a new house that my husband and I share with both a dog and toddler. 😉 I love the look of Persian rugs and know the quality is unbeatable. Do you think there is typically room for negotiation when buying them from a dealer online? Suppose it can’t hurt to try? Thanks again!

Nick Marshall
9 days ago

Great Blog!! Awesome information , really helpful , keep up the good work. hope to see more from you. For best online class help services please visit great-online-class-help

Rusty
9 days ago

Aaaahhhh…yes!! I was shopping on Monday for z5 rug for my mentee’s Safe House room makeover = verrry difficult when the ports they enter the country via are in lockdown! Aargghh!😖
Off for another shopping extravaganza trip tomorrow. Hopefully we’ll find THE rug.

Loved this post!
Soooo helpful with the criteria-based markjng system.
Loved the hoourous aspects of scruffy dawg behaviours too! Always tge scruffies! Always.🐾🐾

Rusty
9 days ago
Reply to  Rusty

Sorry re: typos!🤪

9 days ago

This is a super helpful post! Does anyone have advice on creating a custom sized rug by having a piece of nice carpeting edged? We have an extremely oddly spaced main living space and it feels like the only option that will work to me….

Donna
9 days ago
Reply to  molly

I’ve done that twice now, and it has worked out well. We choose a nubby Berber weave so it wouldn’t look like wall-to-wall. The reason I do this is so that I can get a pet and stain resistant product for a good value. Here are some binding options https://www.arearugfactory.com/edge-binding-choices.

Donna
9 days ago
Reply to  Donna

This link was just an example of binding. I did not buy from this vendor, so I can’t knowledgeably recommend them.

Stephanie
9 days ago
Reply to  molly

We’ve done this too! We had a new runner installed on our stairs, and had a custom carpet bound with the leftover. Super affordable and it looks great. I definitely recommend!

Rusty
9 days ago

I also wanted to say thank you, Emily, for pointing out the importance of finding out how and where hides are sourced.
“Vegan” can often mean plastic, so it’s important to investigate that, too.

Suzanne
9 days ago

I have some pretty good rugs, but I really want a vintage rug with some color and pattern. Clearly you read my mind, because a couple days ago I spent hours on Revival Rugs looking for right color and size. I really want to see them in person though, so I may just keep checking flea markets and antique stores.

Betsy
9 days ago

I will never have another jute/sisal rug with animals again. Every rug I’ve owned, has been ruined by dog barf, or pee. You would think I would have learned a lesson after the first one. Even the second one. Nope! I’ve had 4 of them for some reason. I’m a Kilim/Dhurrie rug girl. Makes animal clean up a breeze. Guess I don’t need cozy.

Question: How do you vacuum a high pile rug?

Lea
9 days ago

Love all of these rugs!

Ashley
9 days ago

Rugs have been my hardest home purchases, with the most mistakes made! My current one I bought from Hook & Loom and so far am loving it. It’s a sustainable/eco friendly company, rugs are made with non-toxic materials. It’s loom-woven Cotton so maybe not great on durability but a decent price and honestly really plush and cozy. Shockingly so. Price is totally reasonable too. Oh and did I mention machine washable? That was a must for me. The pattern selection isn’t to-die-for but several options that were good enough for me! If you can’t find vintage I think a responsible/sustainable company is a great option. (Also should not that mine is holding up with a dog with black, white and grey hair… and my husband already spilled mustard on it and it came out!)

Jess
9 days ago
Reply to  Ashley

I have a Hook & Loom rug, too! My dog occasionally pees on it and I like being able to launder it in the washing machine. After an extensive search, Hook & Loom checked a lot of boxes for me- eco, affordable, washable, and colorful. (I have the rug in a vibrant green.)

Amber
9 days ago

I put an indoor/outdoor sisal runner from sisal rugs direct on my stairs, and it’s been great. It doesn’t look like an outdoor rug, is softer than regular sisal (not super soft though, obvs) and is easy to clean.

Since the stairs are a high traffic area, they get dirty, but the dogs don’t usually puke or pee on steps, so I can’t weigh in on that. It stands up to their nails though.

Otherwise I am 100% team Persian. I’ve purchased so many cut pile, wool rugs (even Flor tiles) that shed for years and/or get discolored from spills. Not doing that anymore.

MJ
9 days ago

Oh man, I had a jute rug a few years ago and even when vacuumed, my cat’s fur was truly WOVEN INTO the fibers of the rug. They became one. 10/10 do not recommend with pet hair unless you find one that is a super tight weave. The chunky weave that you typically find on them is a big no from me even if it hides stains.

Paige
9 days ago

Just a warning to everyone – I totally loved the look of Loloi rugs and bought one last year that I had for maybe 9ish months. It was easy to clean in terms of liquid spills (flat weave) but dirt, hair and dust would literally stick or get sucked up in the rug and be impossible to get out. Vacuuming, raking, etc. nothing helped! I have a long-haired pooch so maybe that’s the trouble but it was in a no shoes/low traffic area and still got so gross every week.

It honestly made me so sad that I sold it (after a deep steam clean!) and haven’t had a rug in my new apartment since. If I were to go with a rug again, I’d do what felt counterintuitive at the time but IMO makes for an easier clean – high pile shag or something similar! I just hated feeling like I was never really cleaning it!

Sorry for the very long rug comment – this post is super helpful Emily and team!

hickenack
9 days ago

Emily, your gorgeous blue foyer rug is what ignited my love of Persian/oushak rugs. I can’t afford or even really find something comparable for my family room (needs 10×12) so I bought a repro just to keep from walking on cold tile and I’m saving up so that if and when I someday find exactly what I want in a vintage rug, I’ll be ready!

Also, please never again include “puke” so many times in one post. hahahahahaha

Kelly
9 days ago

Is there a specific Etsy shop you used to source the vintage Moroccan rugs? Or can you recommend certain Etsy shops for Moroccan rug purchases? Thanks!

Jenni
9 days ago

Have you ever considered traveling to go get your rug? It might turn into somewhat of an adventure, but I used to live in Uzbekistan, and in western Uzbekistan, there is this Silk Carpet workshop that was started by a British friend of mine. It was over 15 years ago that I was there, but basically the idea was that they were trying to resurrect 15th century carpet designs by studying miniatures, etc. and then source and use authentic natural dyes to weave the silk rugs. Silk is very durable and gets shinier with age and wear. Google Khiva Silk Workshops. Bukhara is also a great place for rugs – you would probably be in textile heaven if you went on a tour there.

Logan
9 days ago

Love this post. So very on point for me right now. ❤️ I highly recommend checking out http://www.loomandkiln.com for vintage rugs if you haven’t already. She may have exactly what you’re looking for.

R
8 days ago

This post was a missed opportunity to discuss washable rugs (like Ruggables), carpet tiles like FLOR, and indoor-outdoor rugs. I know they’re not $5,000 Persians, but they are more practical for regular people and I’d love your advice about good (or good enough!) prints, etc.

You said the long shag rugs don’t pass the test for vomit/pee/mud and sustained/regular foot traffic. It would seem those are an example of a rug type that aren’t great for pets.

Katie
8 days ago
Reply to  R

I would have loved a discussion including those rug types. Risking a $5k antique rug on my dog, toddler, and baby (so pee, vomit, peanut butter, you name it) is not the advice I was hoping for when I clicked the link. Ruggable seems like it could be such a good solution, but I worry they’d look cheesy and feel terrible.

Suzanne
8 days ago
Reply to  R

A post about FLOR and Ruggables would be great, but I think this post was focused on rugs that she’s owned or has used in a design, where she could ask the owner how it hold up (Oh Joy, for example). I have ordered FLOR samples, but they are not as soft or natural looking, so I ended up going another route. I have a friend who has them, and when her toddler had an accident, it was pretty amazing to watch her pull up the one affected square, wash it in the bathtub, and hang it dry. She still has the carpet tiles, and it’s been at least 13 years.

kk
8 days ago

Where on etsy did you buy your affordable Moroccan rugs? Link please!

Judy
8 days ago

I have an 8×10 Ruggable in my entry for this very reason. I washed and dried it a few times in my home front-load machines but it took hours upon hours and constant shifting it around to dry. Finally started taking it to laundromat and washing and drying (on low temp) in large machines. But it still takes hours to dry on low temp. Much easier to handle roll and put back down afterwards though. BUT the rug itself shrunk about 2” all around.

Anne
8 days ago

Thank you for your commitment to buying responsibly! One easy way to be certain that no child, forced or bonded labor was used in making a rug is to look for the GoodWeave Label. I noticed some of the new rugs you recommended are GoodWeave certified and some are not.

Amy
8 days ago

Emily, I am dying to know what kind of mix your unbelievably cute doggies are. Have you ever done a DNA test on them?

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