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Design

The Pros And Cons Of The Pot-Filler (+ Brian And My First Farm Renovation Fight)

Few things really rev people up like pot-fillers – I had no idea. Such was the subject of our first actual farm fight of the renovation. I thought it was a no-brainer that we don’t need one because I rarely used the one we used to have and we don’t have one here and I rarely wish we did. Brian, apparently, had a secret emotional, passionate connection to our former plumbing fixture – a daily connection unbeknownst to me in our LA home. Here’s how it went down: on the day of the post about the prep sink (last week) I was reading comments from you about pot-fillers (which came up because I mentioned that never really used ours) and was innocently wrapping up the design of the kitchen. Brian sauntered downstairs, to me announcing that “‘hey’ I’m was nixing pot filler from the design because we never really used ours and it’s an indicator of a luxury new build”. Ladies, my #1 warning is to wait till coffee kicks in before talking renovation with your partner. He was caught off guard and vehemently disagreed with me insisting that he used it ALL THE TIME in our old house and misses it every. single. day. We were not on the same page and it seemed worthy of a discussion here: Pot-fillers – ostentatious luxury or daily utility of convenience? Let’s spout off:

I’ve had a winding relationship with pot-fillers myself and my opinion on them has flip-flopped a few times over the years. When I first heard about them I thought they were pretty, but kinda silly, as if the added real estate from the sink to the stove warranted additional plumbing. Seemed to me like a rich person’s kitchen feature. But that was when I was 28. Before I cooked, before I had kids, and certainly before I could afford to renovate a kitchen with such luxuries or even know what elements should go into a well-designed kitchen renovation.

photo by tessa neustadt | from: our modern english country kitchen

Cut to 2016 when we were planning out my first kitchen renovation in the LA house and I wanted a pot-filler – maybe I was ready for more adult kitchen elements, thinking that IF you are renovating you obviously should make choices that align with what a “nice” kitchen should have. I think at this point Brian could take it or leave it because we had never had one. But you don’t want to miss an opportunity when renovating, right? Over those 3 years living there I rarely used it, so it was mostly for jewelry – for looks and admittedly I do LOVE the way it looks. Brian had a different experience. Looking back I realized that those years were when Brian actually cooked the most, and we made a lot of mac and cheese, pasta, and rice for the kids. So he is very attached to this bit of plumbing because he came to really use and rely on it, and I get that. So let’s explore the pros and cons from my point of view, on the inflammatory pot-filler.

Pros Of Having A Pot-Filler:

photo by tessa neustadt | from: our modern english country kitchen

If you have a big kitchen having a pot filler can be a convenience, for sure. We are not big pasta and rice people (besides kids stuff) but filling up huge stock pots for broth would be helpful, and surely for boiling potatoes or corn on the cob, which can get heavy. So if you are you big stove pot people it’s nice to have and you can just fill up your pot while on the stove instead of carrying it full from sink to stove. I think we all can agree that this is a bit silly/unnecessary (a comment that Brian did NOT respond well to) but it absolutely depends on your kitchen size and your lifestyle (and your arm strength haha).

They are very, very pretty – if you are into plumbing fixtures, which most designers are – then it’s another pretty feature in your kitchen. They are a piece of jewelry that can break up a wall of tile, stone, or drywall (if you are into that), bring some metallic shine over your range, and tie in with your sink faucet finish. Strictly as a design element – they are a nice touch.

Their shape can add an architectural and sculptural element. Speaking simply design here, they articulate out (which we love) and when they recess back they look cool and have a weird shape that contrasts nicely with the straightness of cabinetry and stoves.

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: all the what’s, why’s & how much’s of the portland kitchen

They can make a kitchen look more custom, high-end, and luxurious. The question you have to ask yourself is if that is what you really want anyway (this is my issue). Like jewelry, I think that they add elegance. From my perspective “elegance” has not been an adjective that we have used to describe our future farm kitchen – it’s more “charming, utilitarian, warm, soul-full, sweet, practical”. No glamour or elegance needed, so I felt that maybe no pot-filler was needed.

The high spout allows for other “around the houses” uses, especially if your sink faucet isn’t a gooseneck or bridge (high). Think about filling flower buckets and vases, mop buckets, and watering cans for plants. Right now I tend to go to the hall bath or our bathtub to fill up big watering cans so, yes, that could be very useful. People who drink a lot of tea with tea kettles love the convenience, too.

design by elspeth benoit and arterberry cooke | styled by a 1000xbetter | photo by virtually here studios | from: a master class In Using color in your home without it feeling like a colorful home (it’s not the decor)

Pot fillers are good for resale (there are literally no facts to back this up, it’s just my hypothesis just like anything that seems like a luxury is good for resale). It is something that people see as a luxury that might shift their emotions towards a kitchen when looking to buy. I’m not saying that it should, but I think it does.

The “Cons” Of The Pot-Filler:

photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: the reveal of the mountain house kitchen

It adds to your budget, but not as much as I thought. When you are gutting a kitchen and moving a lot of plumbing it can feel like adding a pot filler is nominal, but it is still likely a couple of hundred dollars in labor before the fixture itself. It’s only a cold water line which can be small. It really depends on how far away it is from a water source for how expensive it is. if you are just updating and not gutting, it’s harder to add (unless you have access through the back wall or if you do a countertop pot filler if you are changing out cabinetry). But if you are doing a full gut remodel then it’s much easier. Now the fixture itself can vary from $200 – $2K so that’s where you’ll spend the bulk of it.

***I’d like to point out that you still have to haul the pot OFF of the stove back to the sink to drain, so put your burly friend’s number on speed dial.

design by rashida banks | photo by keyanna bowen | from: rashida’s totally transformed kitchen reveal (that includes one of our favorite “new classic” kitchen trends)

They aren’t “necessary”, technically. Unlike the sink faucet, a pot-filler is a “good to have” and I think it’s important to question all of your “good to haves” in your home to make sure that you are putting in something you USE, not just something you like. Ahem. Hello, pot? Kettle calling. I know I have a lot of chairs that I LOVE that people don’t necessarily sit in, but going forward this is not the goal. Designers are certainly guilty of this crime, which in my past I didn’t think was a big deal but with the planet screaming at us to stop consuming I currently really think we should lean away from things that are solely pretty, without function. If you use it? Great. If you don’t think you will, rethink it.

They are a sign of luxury and newer construction. This is both a pro and a con depending on what you are going for, but for our house this was is the best “con” against a pot-filler for me and one that I attached my argument to quickly. They are a newer invention and therefore do signal a “new build”. They may send a message of “new and fancy” which may or may not be the message you want to send. It’s not the message I want to send so for me it was an easy “nix”.

photo by zeke ruelas | from: modern deco kitchen reveal

In short – pot-fillers are for convenience and beauty, but that’s about it. So now you have to weigh your affection towards both of those attributes and how high they are on your priority list. For Brian it’s one of the few things he has put his foot down on (thus the fight) because he uses it a lot, and who am I to deprive him of his relationship towards this plumbing fixture. I personally love how some of them look (not all of them) and when done right don’t necessarily look like new construction. Much like a beverage or freezer drawer they indicate new remodel, but not necessarily “luxury”. DeVOL designs their kitchens for utility first and they always put in a po-filler.

We ended the fight with me saying “just because we like something doesn’t mean we should have it if we don’t USE it frequently”, and Brian responding that he promises that he’ll use it, every. single. day. Deal.

If you think they are silly, dumb, and pretentious, simply don’t put one in. For me it’s like having both trail running shoes and HIIT workout shoes – it really depends on how often you do the two different activities to warrant two different pairs of shoes designed for slightly different utility. Having the daily convenience can bring joy and ease to people’s busy lives – and there should not be any judgment on that. If you are super into design and cook a ton it might be an element you want, but if you aren’t then it might be simply unnecessary. Ultimately, in the scheme of things, like most design elements it’s nothing really to argue about and we felt SO dumb for letting it ruin our morning. Brian won this one pretty quickly because he is so rarely passionate about a design/functional element and as his partner, I wanted to respect his perspective and desires in this renovation process. And listen, I like a pot-filler too so this wasn’t a big concession.

While convenience + beauty = perceived luxury, it actually doesn’t have to be a very expensive one. Plus if you get daily use out of a beautiful convenience, then no, it is not a consumptive waste. So Brian and I came up with an obvious rule for our big purchases – that “liking” and “wanting” a ‘”luxury” isn’t good enough (and it shouldn’t ever have been a good enough reason for us), you have to really use it often and appreciate its use and function to include it in our home – whether it’s a splurge or not. I feel like, despite the national pot-filler divide, THAT is something that we can all agree on.

P.S. I was going to do a roundup of them but generally, you should try to match the style and finish of your sink faucet (IMHO).

Opening Image Credits: Photo by Sara Ligorria-Tramp | From: All the What’s, Why’s & How Much’s of the Portland Kitchen

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Elaine
1 month ago

I’ve never seen a pot filler in real life (not really an Irish thing though) so I’m neutral about them. But I think this blog post speaks more about compromise than pot fillers – y’know, making sure the person you love also gets to input into their home, so that they feel it’s their home too. That seems as important to me, if not more important, as any ‘feeling’ the house might aspire to have (the aesthetics). This post also reminds me of a blog from years back where you advised that if someone was to buy something for their home it should be something that’s functional and/or something beautiful and/or something they love, at least 2 of the 3. And on that I think Brian’s hitting all three requirements – its functional (for him), he loves it and it will be beautiful (because you’ll make a great choice on the aesthetic). Happy pot-filling!

Celeste Parisi
1 month ago
Reply to  Elaine

Agree! Would love to see more posts about the behind-the-scenes compromises and impact on your relationship. Managing a renovation is hard on a marriage or long term relationship — how have you been coping and how have you coped in the past?

Mitten
1 month ago
Reply to  Elaine

I’m in New Zealand and I’ve never seen a pot-filler in real life before either! (Maybe Lorde should re write the lyrics to Royals.) Recently moved to a nice 4-bed/2-bath/swimming pool home and never once saw one on the house hunt! Maybe this is one of those ‘only in America’ things?

Mitten
1 month ago
Reply to  Mitten

I’ve seen below that Spain, Australia and someone else in UK are also team “never seen a pot-filler in the flesh”! I’m so curious now, has anyone in any non-US country ever seen one?

Rachel S
1 month ago
Reply to  Mitten

I distinctly remember watching very early seasons of “Keeping Up with Kardashians” and being SUPER confused by the tap at the back of their stove! I’ve never seen one other than on America blogs or tv shows (I’m Australian)

In terms of not wanting to fill the whole pot and carry it I just use a jug!

priscilla
1 month ago
Reply to  Mitten

i have not seen a pot filler in person. maybe i run with the wrong people!

Rusty
1 month ago
Reply to  Mitten

Aussie here … I think so. More, bigger, best.

emma
1 month ago
Reply to  Mitten

I think it’s because American homes (especially custom homes like this) are often oversized with giant kitchens where it actually would be tedious to carry a big pot of water to the stove. I’ve never seen a pot filler IRL but most of my friends live in apartments or very small houses. Personally I can fill the pot at my sink, turn around 180 degrees and set it on the stove without taking a single step, so no need for it here. If anything I feel like I’d rather have a small sink by the stove so that I could fill and then pour out the super hot water without having to carry it and risk spilling – in winter I let it cool on the stove to help warm the apartment but in summer I try to get rid of it ASAP!

Katie
1 month ago
Reply to  Elaine

I’m an American and have never seen one, either! I loved this post, though, and how your walked us through this conflict. Thank you for sharing, Brian and Emily!

wally
1 month ago
Reply to  Katie

I’m American and had never heard of one until today, much less have ever seen one.

1 month ago

I’m glad Brian got his pot filler. In the grand scheme of the renovation, it’s a drop in the bucket.

Kristen
1 month ago
Reply to  Jenny

And will help to put the drops in that bucket.

Jocelyn Richgels
1 month ago
Reply to  Jenny

Agreed. If you are completely renovating a kitchen, adding a pot filler is a drop in the bucket in cost and seems like one of the last items to have a renovation fight over. We have one, we don’t use it daily, but when we do use it, I am so thankful we spent the little extra to put it in.

Leila
1 month ago

I thought these were for boiling water, like those taps you get in big offices that don’t have kettles, but you say you only need a cold water line for them. I don’t think I see the point if they’re not hot though – I boil water in the kettle and use it to boil pasta/rice etc, and to make stock. The kettle lives next to the cooker and I fill it from the sink. I suppose I could fill it from a pot-filler instead. I think they’re pretty (or can be) but honestly an extra $2k or so (because you’ll only like the expensive one) is a hell of a lot on a kitchen remodel for the sake of not carrying a cold pan of water a few steps. And you still have to carry the hot pan to drain it anyway. I’m team no pot-filler, I think, but I’m in the UK and I’m aware from this blog that kettles are much more hassle in the US cos your electrics aren’t good enough.

Evelin
1 month ago
Reply to  Leila

same, I always imagined them spending hot water. If not, what is the point? And I wondered where do they put the first cold water, before it becomes really hot. But just cold water? Mmmh. There is this “magic” design recommendation of a “working triangle” in a kitchen to reduce long ways: sink – stove – fridge. If you can carry the pot back to the sink to drain, you can fill it there first, and even with warm water to speed up the cooking.

Kj
1 month ago
Reply to  Evelin

NEVER use hot water from the tap to cook or drink! It’s not safe and increases risks of lead contamination. https://www.epa.gov/sites/default/files/2015-09/documents/2002_5_17_lcrmr_guidance_lcmr_lead_public_education_poster_v1.pdf

Cece
1 month ago
Reply to  Kj

I think she means a boiling water tap like a Qooker? Is that what they’re called? Rather than a regular hot water tap.

1 month ago
Reply to  Cece

we do have the Qookers in the UK and I definitely want one in our new kitchen. is KJ’s comment above about NEVER use boiling hot water from a tap because it leaches lead based on Qookers or just usiing hot water from the ordinary tap﹖??

Terra
1 month ago
Reply to  Leila

Leila, I thought the same, and followed many of the same thoughts in your own process—so much so that I did a bit of research! Turns out that a pot filler is hooked to one of the two dedicated temperature lines (cold OR hot), so you could actually have one that dispenses hot water. A more compelling case to me, for sure! 🙂

Sally
1 month ago
Reply to  Terra

Nope. No. No, thank you. As someone said above, you do not want ‘normal’ hot water used for cooking. Unless you somehow hooked it up to a Quooker tap or similar, it’s a cold-fill only situation. Incidentally, even if you did use a boiling water tap and had it set up as a pot-filler the flow rate would be weedy enough for it to be a damn annoyance for filling a giant stock pot. Much more economical to use a kettle.

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Leila

We finally got an electric kettle (in the US), snd we love it. My husband often uses it to speed the boiling of water. We’re converting to solar soon, so electric appliances are the way to go for us.

Rusty
1 month ago
Reply to  Suzanne

I’m amazed by the fact there are so few electric kettles in the US!!!
Literally EVERYONE in Australia has one – like everyonehas a toilet.
For real!

tara
1 month ago
Reply to  Rusty

Aussie here and I prefer a stovetop kettle. Pretty and doesn’t take up bench space.

emma
1 month ago
Reply to  tara

I would use a stovetop kettle if I had a gas range, but the electric range just takes sooooo long to boil water – I’ve found that it’s worth it to have a small electric kettle even though it takes up some real estate.

1 month ago
Reply to  Rusty

Us Brits too!!

Sally
1 month ago
Reply to  Leila

Is that why kettles are so difficult to get hold of in the US? I did NOT know that. I had to pay $10 extra for the hotel to give me one in my room once when I was visiting for work so I could make myself cups of tea and most hotels flat out didn’t have them at all. They are standard everywhere else in the world! So funny what matters to people. I am constantly putting on the kettle all day long and to me, It’s one of the most essential items in life, forget about just the kitchen. Can’t imagine worrying about potfillers and so forth if I wasn’t able to have a kettle!

Kj
1 month ago
Reply to  Sally

For the future, most hotels have coffeemakers which you can run without coffee to make hot water for tea. May need to run it once or twice to clear out the “coffee” taste.

Sally
1 month ago
Reply to  Kj

Yes, that is what I was offered each time I asked for a kettle. But hot water is not boiling water which you need for a good cup of tea. I also fill a hot water bottle every night so needed larger quantities than the coffee machine. But to be honest, I think there is also something deeply comforting about the ritual of ‘putting the kettle on’ that goes deeper than that. It’s a signifier. Just the words alone mean something.

DeniseGK
1 month ago
Reply to  Sally

They aren’t hard to get a hold of in the US. I got mine from Amazon, then when it died several years later, I got another one. It’s just a basic Hamilton Beach and cost about $20. I’ve seen them at Bed Bath and Beyond, and the big Walmart on the other side of the city here. I also saw them at a Sears back when we still had one. But the best selection will be online because while they are easy to find and purchase, most people don’t so b&m stores don’t carry much. We don’t have the tradition of electric kettles, while going after the latest scientific gadget *does* have a very strong place in our culture for the last 100+ years – so lots of people are fine with heating in a microwave and those who aren’t get happy by boiling things on the stovetop.

Sally
1 month ago
Reply to  DeniseGK

I meant as a visitor staying in hotels. They are not standard like elsewhere in the world.

kiki
1 month ago
Reply to  Sally

Ok, American here, I love tea. Drink it almost every day. But, I use a stovetop kettle. I find that the electric ones make my tea taste like plastic?? Is it just because there are only crappy one available in the US? Do you have glass ones over there? Or maybe higher quality plastic that doesn’t leave your tea tasting of chemicals??

Eve
1 month ago
Reply to  kiki

I had a kettle once that gave a funny taste (I’ve never had a plastic kettle, always stainless steel which is the norm, but it had some sort of plastic insert. But no that’s not normal, I returned it and got my money back.

Finding out Americans don’t all own electric kettles is really quite mind blowing. As rusty said above they are literally part of our kitchens, it would be Iike having a kitchen without a sink or not owning a washing machine . I had a stovetop kettle once a day it looked cute but was replaced in 5 min because unlike an electric kettle it doesn’t switch itself off.

I could never ever drink tea with water that had been boiled in a microwave. 🤢

Moo
1 month ago
Reply to  Eve

Hi. I think tea culture just isn’t as big in America. But for those families where it is, like mine, we def have electric kettles or stove top kettles. We love coffee too so have gone through a couple of coffee makers lol. I have friends who boil their water for tea & thought it was strange the first time I saw it but to each their own.

Brandi Lucas
1 month ago
Reply to  kiki

I’m American and I have a ceramic electric kettle I use everyday. The ceramic is nice and non reactive so no funky tastes.

Miranda
1 month ago

I don’t quite see the point, but I don’t feel passionately about them. If Brian cares that much and you are neutral – join team pot filler!

As for me, I do cook a lot of pasta, so it would be handy sometimes. But as you said, you still have to haul the even heavier pot (water + pasta or whatever you are cooking) back to the sink to drain. It’s not like it’s a filler and drainer – that’s called a sink! I know fillers are expected in high end kitchens, but to me they read as ornamental, mainly for show not cooking.
The point about filling larger things around the house is good, but I suspect most people who get pot fillers also have high faucets and a utility sink somewhere.

Kj
1 month ago
Reply to  Miranda

“It’s not like it’s a filler AND drainer – that’s called a sink!” Best comment ever!!!! I think pot fillers are silly, but I must be the only one that don’t think they are pretty” so that take the “looks” pro out of the equation for me.

Rachel S
1 month ago
Reply to  Kj

I don’t think they are pretty either…also don’t they get gross from all the steam/cooking splatter. I like an easy to clean surface behind the stove!

Kari
1 month ago
Reply to  Miranda

I’m on this team right here. I did not choose to install one because I didn’t want one/understand their need. If you have to carefully haul a heavy pot of boiling water to the sink to drain it should be no biggie to haul a pot of cold water to the stove. A pot filler is a solution in search of a problem. What I really need is a pot drainer so I don’t have to carry boiling water across the kitchen. Someone invent that, please!

Jenn
1 month ago
Reply to  Kari

You can buy a pasta pot. Remove strainer insert with pasta, leave pot of hot water to cool before puring out.

Sunny
1 month ago
Reply to  Jenn

But then have the dripping water from the strainer all over the counter or the floor?

Erin
1 month ago
Reply to  Sunny

They have a lip on the inside of the larger pot that the strainer nests on top of. When pasta is done turn off the heat, slowly raise the pasta strainer to drain then rest the strainer inside the larger pot at kind of an angle. You don’t have to set on the counter, no spills it just drips right back into the pot. Mine also came with a shallow steamer bucket so you can steam veggies or buns at the same time you boil your pasta.

DeniseGK
1 month ago
Reply to  Erin

This is what I do as well. Plus, once you take off the lid, the insert, and the pasta it contains your bottom pot is at least a couple pounds lighter (well, where I am anyway, most pasta comes in 16oz packages and the lid and strainer insert are pretty solid). My mother-in-law can’t carry the whole pasta pot set up from the sink to the stove (so I do it) but she can carry the cooled pot of water back to the sink (and she insists on doing it).

emma
1 month ago
Reply to  Jenn

My issue with this is that it’s already hard enough to keep my apartment cool in summer that I want to pour out the hot water right away! In winter I definitely leave it out until it reaches room temp though. Thankfully my apartment is tiny enough that i don’t have to walk at all to pour it out, just turn around behind me!

Sheila
1 month ago
Reply to  Miranda

I’m with these peeps. I’d happily spend good money for a pot-draining gadget by the stove. Filling only? Nope. I don’t think they are pretty and one would look silly in my MCM kitchen. A few times a year, when I’m canning, it could absolutely be handy but most of the time it would be something to get greasy and need constant cleaning. If my husband wanted one, I’d make him agree to clean and polish it regularly.

Tracy May
1 month ago
Reply to  Sheila

I have always wondered about the grease factor! While I do boil a whole cut up chicken quite often, I also fry A LOT of bacon 🙂

Valentina
1 month ago
Reply to  Sheila

My first thought was – one more thing to clean. As if it is not enough of a chore to clean the backsplash behind the hobs.

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Miranda

This is why a prep sink near the range is so much more useful. It can be the pot filler and the drain!

Kate
1 month ago
Reply to  Miranda

I agree that it seems superfluous because you have to take it over to the sink anyway!
What I find *really, really* helpful is having a sink faucet that you can pull out – this way when I am filling a large pot of water (or a watering can, or anything large) I put the pot on the counter next to the sink, pull the faucet out and turn it on to fill it up. That way I’m not lifting or moving anything until it’s filled up, nor am I bending over into the sink to pull something out. Win-win.

Cris S.
1 month ago

When we did our kitchen gut reno 3 years ago my husband was surprised that I didn’t put in a pot filler over the stove. My thoughts were I didn’t want another water line that could potentially freeze on a wall that had no other water lines on it (Chicago weather), and that I was putting in a solid expanse of quartz and didn’t want to break up the lines of that, but MOSTLY that I thought it should match the kitchen faucet and since that was Beautiful (with yes, a capital B) but EXPENSIVE (in ALL caps) that I couldn’t justify more money on it (and to be fair, I didn’t know how expensive that faucet was but it was my number one dream for the kitchen and my husband went and bought it for me for my birthday at the very beginning of the reno when we actually had money for it). The rest of my house is furnished from FBMP. There was no way there was going to be a matching pot-filler: https://waterstoneco.com/gantry-pulldown-faucet-4410-18/ (I do really really really love the damn thing and for me it was worth giving up the hallway wallpaper for) BUT, like Brian,… Read more »

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Cris S.

You don’t want another waterline that can freeze, which makes so much sense. Along the same lines, I don’t want extra water lines that can leak (one too many water related accidents).

Anon
1 month ago
Reply to  Cris S.

And don’t forget that in Chicago, most of the water pipes are lead and you have to run the tap to flush any water that’s been sitting in the pipes over night or since last use collecting lead!

It would mean running the water into your pot, carrying it over to the sink (or houseplants) to dump it, then taking it back to the stove to fill. D’oh! What a hassle!

Even now, I always let the water run when first turning on the tap to make sure the pipes are flushed with fresh water before drinking it.

Becca Goodwin
1 month ago

Oh my goodness… I have always thought pot fillers were silly and pretentious UNTIL reading this post! Now I realize how many uses I actually have for one- filling the dog water buckets, filling big containers for brine or sou vide, watering the big plant that never quite fits in the sink, the list goes on! I have just added “add a pot filler” to my mental list of requirements for my future kitchen reno! Thanks Brian!

Kate
1 month ago
Reply to  Becca Goodwin

FYI a super easy alternative is to have a sink faucet that pulls out. Whenever I need to fill a big pot I just put it down on the counter next to the sink, pull the faucet out and fill it up. Super easy!

Sarah
1 month ago
Reply to  Becca Goodwin

Also the flow rate is a lot higher than a normal faucet, so it makes filling large containers much quicker.

1 month ago

As someone said above, I believe a pot filler is a solution looking for a problem, and is totally unecessary. But it is not my kitchen, and Brian’s feelings are equally important in the selection of this particular kitchen’s details. So I say, do it but don’t match the sink faucet – since it is an old farm and the pot filler will not be directly next to the sink, I would go with an iron look or aged copper look for the pot filler. Matchy-matchy screams more “new build” than the pot filler does. Have some older, matte elements that look like could have been on an old farm. Like an old water pump.

1 month ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

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Like this one – although I am sure with a lot of research there are even more interesting ones out there that can be a focal point and also “farmhouse” – maybe a porcelain one?
Elizabeth

DeniseGK
1 month ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

Yeah, I think it would be better for it to coordinate with the range and hood, maybe the cabinet pulls that will be all around it?

Annie
1 month ago

It’s so nice that you listen to and respect each other. That’s the best thing that comes over in your posts about this process.
Pot fillers are ugly, though. Urggh, hideous. Aesthetics will always win hands down over function in my book, stupid me. And I’m with you, who wants their house to look like a developer’s had their way, pushing it towards a ‘high-end’ price bracket?

Alice
1 month ago
Reply to  Annie

Since you said it, I’ll agree: pot fillers are ugly. For a long time I didn’t know what they were and when I would see them in kitchen photos I would wonder what on earth that ugly thing was. I couldn’t even guess. Once I found out that it’s so people don’t have to carry water from the sink to the stove I was surprised. As someone who doesn’t even own a dishwasher I am entertained by all these luxuries.

Alin
1 month ago
Reply to  Annie

Agree. In the images above, I prefer the simplicity of the kitchens that don’t have a big piece of hardware above the stove and I’d rather not have another thing to clean. Go for it, if you like the look and think you’ll use it, but I don’t agree this is what all buyers like and will automatically increase resale value.

Heather Ensley
1 month ago
Reply to  Annie

I completely agree! Like Alice, for the longest time I didn’t even know what they were for. When I found out I thought, seriously? Unless you’re working in an industrial kitchen, pot fillers look like you’ve installed the plumbing from under your bathroom sink over your beautiful backsplash!

Sorry, Brian!

Susan
1 month ago

Whenever my partner and I have a big fight about a specific thing, its almost NEVER about the actual specific thing-even if we both think it is. My guess, the pot filler argument isn’t about a pot filler at all. It could have been about any decision. You hit the nail on the head when you said something like, “Brian felt like I ripped the rug out from under him because I just made the decision and didn’t include him”. The real issue is his legitimate need to have a say in the build of this house, and the reason the argument was resolved and he “won” is because he felt heard and felt that his thoughts carried equal weight to yours. We once had a GIANT fight about a creeping plant in the garden. I wanted a wild carpet of creeping plants my SO preferred a tidy manicured look. We fought about the plant to the point of shouting, but we later realized it wasn’t about the Creeping Jenny at all, but about how we make decisions and who has a say in the outcome. NOW when we have a fight one of us will say, “this is not… Read more »

Margaret
1 month ago

This one is above my pay grade for sure, but: if I had both the money and the want I would spend it on an additional sink within a foot or so of the stove; a sink with a high faucet, and just big enough to drain a pan without splashing on the countertop.
Handling a large pan of boiling water has never been one of my favorite hobbies, and, right now, when I’m using a walker post-surgery, it’s dangerous.

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Margaret

Yes, prep sink close to the stove, as a pot filler and drain.

Susan
1 month ago

Regarding the pot filler specifically, I never just turn on the faucet and use the water that’s been sitting in the pipes overnight, new plumbing or not, unless I’m washing my hands. I know for a fact that for cooking and food I would want to let the faucet run for a few seconds and dump that funky tasting first cup of water. Which I would need a sink for. Which would negate the need. Maybe if the pot filler had a filter I wouldn’t?

Jean
1 month ago
Reply to  Susan

This is one of the main reasons why I didn’t put a pot filler in our (almost completed) new home. We would not use it daily, and I don’t want to use water that has been sitting in those pipes for days (weeks?). I felt like I’d end up flushing the line into the pasta pot just to carry it to the sink and dump it out. No point for us.

Lane
1 month ago
Reply to  Susan

I never let the faucet run as I don’t have the time or patience, but I did install the reverse osmosis filter. We actually removed a garbage disposal in our sink, to make the space needed for a reverse osmosis filter. We installed a small faucet where the button was. So we only use that to fill pots, kettles, while we use regular water to water plants, clean, rinse food that can be wiped before eating. We split the line to connect the filtered water to our fridge so that we could get cold water and ice as needed. It would not be possible to connect a pot filler to that. It would have to be a different solution. I would also not use filteted water to water plants or clean. The filter uses a lot of water and filters are an added cost too. We do have a lead service line, which isn’t a big problem but we wanted to be sure our water is good. Aside from the fact that my kitchen is too small for that, it would be an extra challenge to make sure water is safe. That’s something to think about in some areas.

Dena
1 month ago
Reply to  Lane

We have a reverse osmosis water line as well so I use that to fill any pot and our electric tea kettle (ha I’m American and hubby is Canadian which is why we have electric). I would not use tap water for cooking!

Jessica
1 month ago
Reply to  Susan

This has been my thinking all along on these fixtures. Unless you have fancy plumbing or filters, you shouldn’t just run and immediately collect the water.

katy
1 month ago

Why not just let him have the pot filler? I fail to see why this is a big enough deal to warrant an entire blog post. In marriage, not every battle is worth fighting. Especially one that isn’t a major design element in your renovation. Just….let it go and get the dang pot filler. Check, done, fight avoided.

Anna
1 month ago
Reply to  katy

It’s an opportunity to talk about a particular kitchen feature and factors that influence these kinds of decisions. Just as worthy of a blog post as anything else, I think. 🤷🏼‍♀️

Lea
1 month ago

Great read Em! Not having put in a pot filler in our new build (sub-below winters can equal freezing water lines in some cases) I always felt left out of the pot filler group. The more I thought about it, the more I thought sure, filling a pot would be “nice” but I still have to haul that sucker over to the sink to drain it, so did it really save my arms and back anyway? On the flip side, I agree, love the aesthetic of them.

Viktoria
1 month ago

If you have your regular sink or even a prep sink within two steps from the stove, don’t get a pot filler. Even if you are using a crab/lobster pot that’s really heavy, you can manage a step or two. If the stove is more than two big or three steps away from the water source, get a pot filler. it’s all about function.

Deena
1 month ago

I never used the one that came with the house we purchased. It would occasionally leak after it had been used. Worse, the brushed nickel finish collected a film of grease residue from the stove-top cooking. It became a redundancy for us.

cathy
1 month ago
Reply to  Deena

There was pot-filler in a house we moved into several years ago. The previous owner used a designer and installed a very-high end kitchen with handmade tile. Keeping the pot filler grease free was difficult and time consuming. When it leaked, there was a nightmare situation that involved removing hand made tile and opening up an outside wall. If you put in a pot-filler, I highly recommend planning how to handle any future repairs. When we moved and renovated a damaged kitchen, I did not install a pot-filler. I did select two very high arching faucets for the sink. The sink is deep and wide. The gas-stove grates, 14 inch skillets and large pasta pots fit easily.

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Deena

This is why I wouldn’t want one. Leaks are no fun! I don’t even want a water line to the refrigerator or freezer. Too many water problems.

Ellie
1 month ago

I agree that since Brian felt so strongly, it made sense to get one–but only for that reason! Pot fillers don’t do anything for me aesthetically. But mainly I’ve never understood the point. Yes, it’s easier to fill the pot, but you still have to empty it in the sink (likely when it’s filled with boiling water), so although you’re only doing 50% of the heavy lifting, it’s the hard 50%! And, like others, I don’t think it’s a good idea to use water for cooking after it’s been sitting in the pipes for a while, so that would create the need to fill a little, dump, then return to the stove–largely negating the whole purpose. I also can’t help but think about how hard it would be to get access to the pipes if there were a problem. I admit I had never thought about other uses (like filling watering cans or buckets)–but if I were starting my kitchen from scratch, I’d make sure I had a sink that could accommodate those items, if I used them regularly.

Gwoman
1 month ago

For me, adding a pot filler would just another thing I’d have to clean. Every time I’d use the stove, there would grease in the air attaching itself to the pot filler. And since I do a lot of Asian style cooking, I can imagine, over time, the pot filler would get that oily, greasy film like under the hood vent, no matter how much you cleaned it. So, no matter how convenient it might seem, it would be a hard no for me.

A.B.
1 month ago

Use mine every day, numerous times, for tea pot and coffee machine.

Sally
1 month ago

I have never seen one in real life either – they do not seem to be a thing in Australia. Someone told me they are not allowed under our building regs as considered dangerous because of risk of overfilling pots which become too heavy to carry and having scalding accident but I really don’t know if that’s true. I think they spoil the look of a nice splashback though.

Awfulknitter
1 month ago
Reply to  Sally

I’d never heard of a pot filler until Emily mentioned them. They aren’t a thing in the UK either we seem to manage fine without!

MoMo
1 month ago

I vote silly.

I suppose if there were a way to also drain the pot right at the stove, I might see the point. But no matter what you are cooking in that vast pot, you need to haul it back to the sink — this time with boiling water in it — so at best, the pot filler is only half usable.

I have had friends who have had them installed and in the process, the plumber over-tightened the connection and cracked all that expensive Italian marble RIGHT in the middle of the stove backsplash. Before one pot was filled!!! They also need to be cleaned, obviously, (the faucets, not the plumbers) and I can’t understand adding one more thing to your kitchen that will get grimy. And as already mentioned, any part of it can break or flood. Seriously, can this be worth the hassle?

Install an all purpose tall kitchen sink faucet and it will meet all of the needs a pot filler can; buckets, dog bowls, flower arranging. Simplify, simplify, simplify. Cheers, all.

1 month ago

I recently remodeled my kitchen and the pot-filler was the element that I was most excited about. Well that and the farmhouse sink. For me, it’s evocative of the days my mom cooked big pots of pasta and sauce on the stovetop. The addition of the pot-filler makes it easy to fill the pot, add in splashes of water to cooking, fill the kettle, and they just look so good.
This is also the element that gets a lot of questions and comments when people stop by the house. It’s a fun one and something that isn’t too expensive. I would highly recommend and align with Brian’s daily use and passion for the pot-filler! LOL!

Cris S.
1 month ago

Why does almost everyone who is anti-pot filler (and I don’t care if you have one or not – go for what makes you happy) seem to think that a pot of water MUST be emptied WHILE still boiling? Why can’t they wait until it’s cooled and then empty it????
Especially when Emily has said they are more ‘leave the dishes in the sink for a while’ people and not ‘so uptight this pot of boiling water must be emptied immediately regardless of danger/kids walking around/still in the middle of cooking/don’t really care to empty it until I’m ready to wash things issues??????

Cris S.
1 month ago
Reply to  Cris S.

Talk about a tempest in a literal teapot! 🙂

Gwoman
1 month ago
Reply to  Cris S.

What about when you cook pasta? I’ve never liked just scooping the pasta out of the pot…leaves too much water, especially when you’re cooking shells, macaroni, etc. So for me, I would be moving that hot pot of boiling water full of pasta across the kitchen so I could dump it in a colander.

BW
1 month ago
Reply to  Gwoman

I have a stock pot with a steamer/pasta insert so I can drain the pasta immediately without having to move the pot of boiling water. This is the one I have. We make a lot of pasta, stock, potatoes, corn, etc., so it’s really been invaluable! https://www.surlatable.com/all-clad-8qt-multi-cooker/2574689.html

Lane
1 month ago
Reply to  BW

When I cook pasta, I drain and put the strainer back in the pot and cover with a lid. That way it doesn’t dry too much before I finish cooking sauce. When I cook soups, I measure the liquid ingredients before filling the pot. Often times I use stock so no need to use regular water. When I cook potatoes, I drain them first and then back on the stove to do mash potatoes or to evaporate some remaining water out of them. Soup, stock and pasta require most water in my cooking. Almost everything else I steam or cook in smaller amount of water so it’s easier to carry as needed. It seems everyone develops their own cooking methods. I don’t have a big enough kitchen to need a pot filler so I can’t envision one needing it anyway.

priscilla
1 month ago
Reply to  Gwoman

We drain our pasta in the sink, in a colander that is inside the Nambe bowl in which we are going to serve said pasta. The just-boiling water heats the Nambe and our pasta never gets cold at the table

Lill
1 month ago
Reply to  Cris S.

Ummm…… so you can get the pasta (or whatever) out of the pot while the food is hot.

Rachel S
1 month ago
Reply to  Lill

Yup. You literally have to drain pasta (or gnocchi or any other food that is cooked but not served in liquid) when it’s hot or its not pasta, it’s pasta salad…

Carol
1 month ago

Count me as part of Team Silly Vanity. If your kitchen is large enough that you need to cut down your trips from sink to stove that much, you probably have bigger problems with your design. Add to that the cleaning hassle as well as the need to run the water so you’re not using water that’s been sitting in the pipes for however long, the potential for plumbing shenanigans and their repair behind a potentially expensive backsplash, and pot fillers just seem to be a bit of a waste all around.

Fiona
1 month ago

I LOVE our pot filler. My husband is a plumber, and told me “nobody really uses them much” but because he was doing the labour for our renovation, and we could get a discount on the fixture, we went for it. And both of us are surprised by how much we use it! Our kitchen is small, so not a long walk to the sink, but with both of us working in there, it’s nice to not have to walk past eachother. We use it every morning in the winter to make our oatmeal, and use it every time we make rice, quinoa, pasta. Is it a luxury? Yes. But for what ended up being another $400, totally worth it. To me, I would rather spend money on something I use every day instead of some new clothes or shoes. I probably wouldn’t have been able to justify the cost if husband wasn’t a plumber though…

Roberta Davis
1 month ago

I think it started as a fad when luxury was cool. Not to say they aren’t useful, but like you- I figure I still have to haul the full pot back to the sink. One more place where a leak or accident can happen and “accidents” inside the house with water are never good.

Eve
1 month ago

I have never known anyone who had a pot filler, or even heard if one outside this blog, and they seem totally unnecessary to me, but I just recently was told that not all Americans gave electric tea kettles (if I wanted to top up a pot on the stove I would likely pour water from the kettle) so maybe they are popular in the states for this reason. Adding plumbing for filling an espresso machine would be more my priority 😁 . But regardless if this, my thought is that generally when one partner is likely choosing 99% of the kitchen and the other indicates they really want a certain feature, just say yes. Even if he never uses it, he’s likely giving you autonomy in almost everything else.

Eve
1 month ago
Reply to  Eve

Also, in terms of looking “new build”, you’re going for induction hobs anyway aren’t you? So it’s not like your stovetop is going to look 100 years old.

Jessica
1 month ago

1) Doesn’t the fixture require constant cleaning since it is in the backsplash realm (we do a lot of stir frying and sautéing)? 2) Aren’t you supposed to run the tap for a few seconds before you start collecting the water? Can’t do that over the stove. Dunno, this would be a “no” for our reno, but to each their own!

Rusty
1 month ago

You said “filling flower buckets and vases, mop buckets, and watering cans for plants”… you’ve gotta be joking!?!
You have exactly that in your mud room sink! Seriously.
Brian doesn’t ask for much though, so (even though they scream ‘new build’ and opulence, plus superfluous ), he shpuld get a few things he likes/wants in the greater scheme of things.

pj evans
1 month ago
Reply to  Rusty

Not everyone has a mudroom, much less a mudroom with a sink. I would love to have a mudroom with a sink. No one I know has one. Don’t assume things. Also, pot fillers aren’t opulent. Maybe some consider them fancy but opulent is a stretch.

Julie S
1 month ago

I do think it’s an “off” element for the home & kitchen style you’re going for… definitely not something in my mental picture of homey authentic farmhouse. But then again, I never noticed them in the DeVol kitchens and they DO fit my image of what style kitchen you’re going for!

Rusty
1 month ago
Reply to  Julie S

Yes. Definitely not Shaker simplicity.

Jordan G
1 month ago

We recently did a budget renovation of our kitchen. We live in a relatively nice area where higher end touches are expected and since weren’t doing a full gut job or adding more space to the kitchen, I wanted to make some improvements that would make the kitchen feel more “high end” for resale. In addition to aesthetic things like new cabinet fronts and backsplash, we added a pot filler and vented our stove outside instead of the recirculating vent it had. I tried to channel someone who really enjoys cooking (not me) and I felt like these little details could be selling features. Ours was only $80 from Homary.com and the plumbing cost was really minimal. I try to use it whenever I can. I have no regrets, but of course we would have been totally fine without it.

Jordan G
1 month ago
Reply to  Jordan G

It was on sale when we bought it, but here’s the one we got. I was trying to channel the classic, timeless aspect of the beautiful servant kitchen I saw in the Breakers mansion. https://www.homary.com/item/wall-mounted-retractable-twin-lever-handle-cold-only-tap-with-dual-swing-joints-10289.html

Celia
1 month ago

I added a pot filler when I remodeled my kitchen five years ago. I have several large pots for making stock and broth and thought it would be nice to fill them up on the stove. I added a water filtration system to the pot filler so the cost was increased a bit, but still not a budget breaker.
What I love about it is the higher water pressure. My other new plumbing fixtures are all low-flow, good for water conservation, but really slow when filling up large containers. So I enjoy the pot filler for how quick it is. And it has never been an issue to let the pot cool then drain in the sink. I have really enjoyed mine. And while I see the rationale for trying to evoke the look of an older farmhouse, it doesn’t make sense NOT to install something just because it is “modern.” They had water pumps back in the day and nobody expects you to install one of those…

Asuncion
1 month ago

I have never seen any pot filler in my country (Spain) I think it is more convenient to have a deep sink not far from the stove.
I think it could be very incovenient when you manipulate big and heavy pots on the stove.
If you let some water fall on the stove it could be very messy.
But, again, kitchens here as small compared to the US, and the sink is rarely far from the stove.

Eleanor
1 month ago

I’ve never had a pot filler so I don’t know if I will actually like it in practice. When we did our kitchen reno, I did not think I need it (or want it) especially my sink is just a couple of steps away from the stove. Personally, I think it is unnecessary (because a good kitchen design should not have sink and stove a long distance away from each other and to Emily’s point it only solves the sink to stove part, not the stove to sink part) and I don’t think it makes the kitchen prettier or look more upscale either. In the end, however, a reno must please all parties who will be using the space so it’s good that Brian will have his pot filler.

Joyce Garrity
1 month ago

Tho I’d like it, I would not get a pot filler. To me needless luxury and something else to maintain/break/clean. At 67 I also prioritize keeping my body strong (and after 50 muscle mass depletes 50% in a week!) In my house I do do I want it or do I need it. .. and I don’t need it. Sorry Brian.

Heather Ensley
1 month ago
Reply to  Joyce Garrity

I love your perspective, Joyce! I’m 35, but I’ve read that the conveniencing of home and garden gadgets over time has led to premature aging in our society, contributing to weakening the muskuloskeletal system. So I’ve been trying to do much more by hand or manually, including kneading dough, etc.

Rusty
1 month ago
Reply to  Heather Ensley

Heather, yes! This is interesting, because my friends go to the gym and complain about the cost, time, gear required…. they have cleaners and gardeners.
I clean my own house and garden and am fit as a result.
It’s a no-brainer.

Mariele
1 month ago
Reply to  Heather Ensley

I thought I was the only one! I had that epiphany a long time ago and have purposefully avoided extra convenience when planning because of that. Keeping my body in good shape means actually using my body, and there’s no better way to do that than to just incorporate it into my lifestyle. It’s also one of many reasons why I prefer to walk to the grocery store, rather than drive. Other people think I’m nuts, though. 🙁

Kara
1 month ago
Reply to  Mariele

I live in NYC and I sometimes feel like a pack mule carrying home groceries, or a new plant or something heavy and awkward, but I also look at my errands as a form of exercise. If I didn’t have to walk everywhere like I do, I’d likely be 30 pounds heavier too!

Debra
1 month ago

Potfillers in a home, rather than a restaurant, feel pretentious and “lifestyles of the rich and famous” to me. How can we be so afraid of a little heavy lifting? Cancel the expensive gym membership and start lifting at home! (Sorry Brian).

Victoria
1 month ago

I agree that most kitchens do not need a pot filler but it was very important to me in ours. We do not have a tight work triangle or a triangle at all, we ended up with a long kitchen and the sink on one end while the stove and island are almost on the other end of the house, the pot filler eliminates a serious annoying inconvenience and makes that lay out work for us. We use it frequently.

Sarah
1 month ago

This is definitely an interesting discussion. I had a farmhouse, in the actual country, for about 25 years. I would have loved a pot filler for all the processing of garden fruits and veggies. Whether you can or freeze, you are constantly filling big pots to boil water. Since we never did a gut reno, it wasn’t worth the cost, but I would definitely add it if I were. I also cooked and froze gallons of soups and stews and that never gets carried back to the sink to dump. Finally, I think a pot filler may not be as luxurious as fully tiled walls/ceilings, although I am pro using all the tile you want!

Liz M
1 month ago

I don’t have one and we live in a new build that I designed. I have never once in my life thought about using or needing one. I like the look of a piece of art behind the stove to break up the back splash. Now – if someone could invent a contraption that sucked out all the hot water so I don’t have to dump that at the sink – well that would be another story and much more convenient in my opinion 🙂

Erin
1 month ago

So many good points to ponder. Make sure you have good access in case of a leak, you do not want to rip up your beautiful hand crafted tiles so make sure you have access on the back side, I think that would be in your family/tv room because patching drywall is much easier. Consider a whole house water filter which you can get for removing particles, bacteria etc. for any water you use for drinking or cooking so you don’t have to clear your pipes before using the water. We plumbed our pot filler with hot water because we have a utility sink in the mudroom adjacent for other uses and it can cut down on time/energy consumption to boil that water if it’s hot. My want for pot filler comes from my small frame, about Emily’s size, hoisting a big pot of hot water out of the sink and hauling over to the stove is not super easy esp when you have health issues that could make it even more difficult (arthritis, MS, carpal tunnel, post-surgery etc). We are building our house to grow old(er) in so we wanted to make sure this is something that will help… Read more »

emily jane
1 month ago

Hhhmmm, “perceived luxury” seems like the slipperiest of slopes to design from..? I find my old ‘people-pleaser’ self is triggered by the phrase while my newer, post-therapy self is shouting “Wait! Stop! You can’t please everyone!” and “You’ll hurt yourself trying!”. I’m glad in the end Brian will get his utilitarian pot filler and you, your extra piece of jewelry : )

Jennifer
1 month ago

I’m wondering if a lot of commenters are solo cooks, or don’t cook much. Yes, you still have to empty the pot in the sink later. But, it’s still a huge convenience to have a separate faucet when prepping a meal. Often, my husband and teen daughter and I are cooking/prepping dinner together. The sink gets a lot of use- washing hands, filling the dog bowl, washing produce, washing dishes as we cook. We don’t have a pot filler or prep sink, but either one would be welcome- frequently there are times when one of us is waiting for the other to finish with the sink. It’s not about carrying the heavy pot over at all- that’s no big deal. But I would love another water source. If I had to choose, I would pick prep sink over pot filler because it would have more uses– and it wouldn’t get grimy from stove grease. But I totally get the practicality of adding a pot filler faucet.

Victoria
1 month ago

A little tangent: my uncle recently bought a luxury SoCal home from people who are from Italy. There is a built-in pot in the counter next to the sink with a faucet AND a drain in the bottom. It’s for cooking pasta!

Elise
1 month ago
Reply to  Victoria

A friend did a kitchen reno in the early 2000s, he put in a pot filler and also the built-in pasta pot in the counter. I loved the built-in pasta pot but didn’t really care for the pot filler. But if Brian wants one, then I say go for it. Personally I don’t like the look, nor having to deal with cleaning it above a stove. And I agree with others that you should always let the water run for a few seconds before using it to cook.

Andrea
1 month ago
Reply to  Victoria

Ok we need a photo of this!

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Victoria

This sounds similar to a product Gaggenau used to make. There’s was a steamer with a drain that you’d add a faucet to. I steam vegetables a lot, so it seamed perfect and multiuser. I wanted it for my prep sink when I finally redo my kitchen, but sadly they don’t make it anymore. They still have the product page here:
https://www.gaggenau.com/us/products-list/VK414610
I’d love yo hear about similar products.

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Victoria

I just found out that Wolf makes one. Super pricey, of course!
https://www.subzero-wolf.com/wolf/cooktop/15-inch-steamer#

Angelica Garcia
1 month ago

Meh. I’m meh on a pot faucet. Good points on the “liking” vs “everyday functional” topic. Im also glad you mention this against a consumption driven world. Wish more of us thought of the environmental impact of our “rightful and afforded” choices more often. I’m a simple gal with a family in a small kitchen and limited water credits. I’m also living in an “affluent” neighborhood that expects these luxuries in a home. It’s an easy NO. I’d rather have a prep sink, it has more function than a pot filler. A bidet?! An outdoor shower may have more function.

Suzanne
1 month ago

Prep sink and bidet! Way to prioritize! I’m with you.

Rusty
1 month ago

Me too!

Emilie
1 month ago

I don’t think using an item is necessarily a justification for getting an item; rethinking our relationship with the planet might mean sometimes going without something that we might use if we had it. I think a pot-filler is a pretty easy thing to cut from the list of upgrades, whether your family might use it or not. Having said that, I don’t think it puts a big dent in the overall impact of your renovation.

LN
1 month ago

This fits into the “lazy Susan” category for me… a little added convenience if you’re into it. But I don’t think the argument of it being a feature of a new build is a convincing reason not to get it. It seems like there are plenty of other elements you are incorporating that aren’t historically accurate. No shade intended, I would want to put in
what I want if I were building a place as well. 😂

Deadairgirl
1 month ago

I am a “pot”-filler convert. I never liked the look above the stove and could certainly never figure out why they were always mounted so high. Doesn’t it splash with the water having to travel such a distance and get greasy/grimy? Anyway, during our kitchen remodel we ran a cold water line to the beverage/coffee/espresso/hot chocolate station for an undercounter ice maker and I had the thought it would be nice to tap into to fill up the coffee/espresso machines and our Yetis we all use for drinking water instead of having to go all the way across the kitchen to the sink. Since the “backsplash” in our kitchen is counter-to-ceiling windows, we opted for a counter-mount. Best decision ever. We use it every single day, multiple times a day. It’s also near the baking area so having it handy for recipes, filling the watering can for plants and a dozen other uses is magnificent. We are a family of six and, especially with all of us working/schooling full-time from home the last 16 months, this has greatly added to the enjoyment of our kitchen. As we all know, access to the sink is prime location in the kitchen so… Read more »

Kj
1 month ago
Reply to  Deadairgirl

Use quarter sheet pans instead of full or half sheet! They are so much easier to maneuver, use and clean. They fit anywhere.

Cici Haus
1 month ago

They seem silly to me. You still have to carry the heavy pot full of water to dump it out, and at that point it’s usually hot and more dangerous (my mom almost died when I was a kid because she was dumping out a big pot of spaghetti and it hit the counter ledge and flipped back on her, giving her 3rd degree burns).

I’d rather have a small faucet (or “pot filler”) above my dog’s water bowl!

monica
1 month ago

Ummm- I don’t think you need any more input about the pot filler. Had to come here to say that you should NOT have to add a lot of water to a pot for corn! Best and easiest way is to put just a few inches of water in a pot, bring to a boil, add corn, put on lid for 3-5 min. Done. No need for tons of water.

Sally
1 month ago
Reply to  monica

Monica, that is a complete revelation to me. I didn’t know that at all and find it such a drag boiling enough water to cover the corn, even if I’ve boiled some in the kettle to speed up the process. Love that useful tip. Thank you.

Hana
1 month ago

I know I’m probably in the minority but I don’t like the way pot fillers look. They make the area look to busy IMHO. They also make that area harder to clean and it’s hard enough already. We have our prep sink across from the stove with a high faucet and made it a quick fill by drilling out the aerator. It works great and it’s only like two steps from the stove. That being said, I think compromise is important and if it was something my husband really wanted as he does most of the cooking, I’d be fine with having one. Thankfully, he doesn’t care for them either.

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Hana

Hana, we plan to put our prep sink across from the stove, too. It sounds like you like it. I keep wondering if it would be better on the same run of counters. But a turn and a step is really close, too.

Hana
1 month ago
Reply to  Suzanne

I love it across from the stove. We have an L shaped kitchen. The short side of the L has a sink next to the dishwasher. That sink has one large basin for dirty dishes and a pull down sprayer. The other sink is on the long side of the L with a double basin and the tall faucet. It is a deep two bowl sing for prep and pot filling. Directly ac!ross from it is the island with the stove. We have three areas for prep. Next to the stove, next to the prep sink and another area on the long side of the L for pastry and bread making. We use every inch and I wouldn’t change a thing to this layout. I especially enjoy the cleaning area away from all food prep as I find that the over spray is kinda gross around food.

Suzanne
1 month ago
Reply to  Hana

Thanks, Hana. My husband really wants no corners in the kitchen, which is doable in our kitchen footprint. Our design plan has a run of cabinets on each side, one with the main sink and dishwasher, the other with the range and refrigerator. There’s just enough space for a narrow island with a prep sink, which creates a tight work triangle with the stove and fridge. I’m pretty excited about it, but the process is taking awhile. I’m so glad to hear you like your set up with the prep sink across from the stove.

Patricia
1 month ago

I knew it was the pot filler fight! I’ve never had one or wanted one, but each to their own.

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