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Design

The AD House Tour That Took Over Our Last Zoom Meeting – Here’s What We Thought Photo By Photo

Well, it turns out love can pay the bills when you cofound an extremely popular dating site! Within a matter of hours, we were all pouring over the photos of Tinder’s co-creator, Sean Rad, and his wife, Lizzie Grover Rad’s, newly finished home designed by the wildly talented Jane Hallworth (She is also responsible for Kirsten Dunst’s home). While being a fairly neutral-toned home, the amount of out-of-this-world vintage, special details, and bold moments really suck you in. You simply can’t stop looking around, noticing all the treasures.

Naturally, we had A LOT of opinions, observations, and questions. So we thought, “Hey, this should be a blog post!” We immediately began recording our Zoom call as we chatted through each photo and I am here to spill:)

Emily’s initial response to this photo was that it was the prettiest and safest of all the rooms. She didn’t mean that it was in any way boring, but more that it’s soft and easy on the eyes. Jane and the clients took some awesome risks in most all of the other rooms which we will definitely get to but that is why she feels this one is “the safest”. She also pointed out/said how much she loved that wood door casing. It’s just a beautiful touch and in a later photo, you’ll see this really awesome detail on the top piece. Em thinks it’s decorative and I thought it might be a vent.

We all freaked out over that tree and planter. The planter is a 16th-century marble water-well head from Italy. WHAT?

Caitlin also pointed about that given the room’s sheer size, that it’s really impressive how cozy it feels in comparison. I thought it was a smart choice to not add any art about the doorway into the next room. I thought it helped to keep it airy and doesn’t take your eye too far up thus making it potentially feel less cozy.

Mal pointed out the little pendant that looks like it’s hanging from the tree (?). She loved it but some of us weren’t 100% on board. But hey, it adds some playfulness which we are always a fan of.

Lastly, the floor. Well, the actual floor is STUNNING but I want to talk about the rug. I pointed out that it’s in line with the solid rug trend I spotted at the beginning of the year. Em even said she is finding she only wants solid rugs in the farmhouse. Insider info!

The first words out of Ryann’s mouth were, “Oh, that chandelier.” And we seconded. However, it was quickly followed by Mallory asking how often do you actually like those candles, to which Em said it’s really just a piece of art. But also how cool would it look lit up?! So we aren’t sure where the main lighting comes from. There is a console with at least one table lamp but we don’t know. Secret can lights?

The next hot topic was the table and its slender width. Caitlin found it not super practical as it looks only about 24″ deep. But since Em was literally just looking at a farm table about the same size (and her and Brian sat at it), she said that’s actually the average width of a restaurant table and is totally comfortable. Of course, you run into the issue of possibly not having enough space for platters but otherwise not that impractical.

But we do have a question for you though. How do you feel about armchairs for every chair?? Do you love it or is it not your preference?

Lastly, while the look is BEAUTIFUL, we were surprised by the rug choice. A white shag is only for the most responsible adult eaters. O and the scale of the art piece was a slam dunk in all of our books. Emily made the excellent point that with every piece being a high-end vintage piece or one-of-a-kind, this room couldn’t be repeated. It’s all spectacular and supremely special. It’s also why you hire a designer like Jane:)

Here’s another little shot of the dining room. Ok see, one lamp (we loved the shape and scale) but still no sign of overhead lighting. It shall remain a mystery. The planter though is awesome. Em rightly noted that this home had “really great planter game” and pointed out the beautiful moss at the base of the tree. We also loved the screen. It’s art that doesn’t hang on the wall:)

This piano was controversial. Mal and Caitlin LOVED it while it wasn’t the rest of our favorite. But it’s nothing if not unique! Ryann also really dug the piece of art and “chalkboardness” of it. I made a dumb joke that it was the coding for the original Tinder app. We all loved the plant and bench because duh.

Em immediately pointed out how great the positioning of the two off-centered sconces was but that they probably weren’t reading lamps but instead a cool lighting feature for the wall. We then noticed the table lamp on the other side which Caitlin, Mal, and I dug.

We didn’t notice the chrome side table at first but thought it was a fun, modern contrast to all of the other organic elements.

Then I asked how everyone felt about the bed styling. Em thought it looked super cool but not one she would actually want to sleep in. She personally likes it more plush:) Caitlin called it Monastery chic.

Also that tree game, again! Caitlin was worried about it being a little too close to the edge but I loved that choice.

That vanity!!! It’s vintage from the 50s! We all loved it so much and it was Mal and Ryann’s favorite room. The marble is crazy cool but Em said it would be a little much for her if it were her home. But WOW. Also, do you see that etched-out line border on all of the walls??? What a detail! Em was sure that the fabricator must have been stoked:)

Another thing to note is that the floor is actually large cut-out marble diamonds and not a single slab. O and the rest of the vintage is just stupid good.

Ryann: “Give me all the marble.”
Caitlin: “I would die to have a marble room.”

Caitlin: “This makes me want to die I love it so much. This could be my room in the house. They wouldn’t even know I was there”
Ryann: “I know.”

That’s how this room convo started. We all just immediately fell for that lounge. At first, Em was a little confused about how the fabricator curved the marble but then we looked closer and it seems like they cut that slab into tiles, making those curves possible. Em pointed out that this must have taken a lot of figuring out how to execute given that you can’t mess around with marble that expensive and in a bathroom where you need to consider the potential moisture issues. So impressive.

The only other main question we had was about the pendant. It looks vintage so how is it damp-rated?! Is there a way to do that to any light? Em didn’t think so. I want to know!

Mallory immediately swooned over these chairs because they are SO cool. I was a little bit concerned about the white fabric. But if you can do it/don’t mind a possible stain then you should! Would you??

My initial reaction to the whole kitchen, while I thought it was beautiful, I mean look at that marble, was that it felt a little small for how grand the rest of the house feels. Maybe it’s just the photo, IDK. Caitlin wanted to see the storage/pantry. How fun would that have been?! But we all loved that vintage table.

Em: “This room is a showstopper. Look at that marble valance! They really went for it. I also can’t believe that tub was made out of a single piece of stone.”

I couldn’t get over the secret door and Caitlin loved the hardware and noted that this bathroom would likely be pretty easy to clean. Ha. Ryann also pointed out that this home’s stool game was on point. Go look back at all the photos when you finish and you’ll see what she means.

Mal did question the heaviness of the door which is a good point. However, if I had the money I would totally do that regardless.

Em’s actual favorite part of this room was that sick plant. Yikes, it’s so special. Does anyone know what it is?

At first, we thought this was Sean’s office. While that would have totally been fine we all liked it a little more when we found out it was Lizzie’s due to the fun racy art and torso. Not saying that’s the right response but interesting how it could make us have that mental shift.

Em: “This one is by far the most controversial. It has my favorite thing in the whole house and the thing I find most challenging for me.”

Can you guess her favorite thing?? It’s definitely that giant vintage disco ball. It’s so rad. Fun fact! Lizzy hand-distressed it with espresso powder. It gives it just a cool, sexy effect. What Emily wasn’t so sure about were all the sheepskins on the floor. It just wasn’t her thing but said that she loved staring at this photo.

Ryann said she would spend all of her time in this room. She loved the books on the floor, the sofa, and the general more maximalist, eclectic vibe in here and hopes Lizzie just lays on the floor all of the time. I don’t disagree. It’s awesome.

Again, these trees.

We all loved this furniture so much but really want to know if it’s actually weatherproof. Regardless I want it all.

This office was a collective “hell ya!”. The paneling, the mix of medium and dark wood tones, those green chairs (!), and the OG Apple computer.

Em really loved how cozy and warm it felt and especially was loving those wood walls.

Mal pointed out the awesome joinery on the desk. Oof, it’s good. Another space we would love to work in:)

We loved this shot! That chair and desk art pop so perfectly in the space.

So in addition to the disco ball and the plant in the primary bathroom, Emily said she would steal this chair too. It would look awesome in the farmhouse. The patina is perfect, the color is beautiful and warm, and those arms. Hubba, Hubba!

Mal couldn’t get enough of the pendant and how they hung it. They just made a simple choice that made the room so much cooler. Caitlin noted that this could have been a fun design agony solution if someone had angled walls with junction boxes in not normal places.

Em also really liked the color of the room because it’s calm but cozy. O and look at how sweet those short curtains are??

Ryann really wants this sculpture! I mean it’s beautiful!!

I also loved this shot because I felt like it married all the elements that are consistent throughout the house – the wood paneling, plaster walls, very old vintage, and modern vintage with the playful yellow and white scones!

It’s just so pretty.

Here you can see the doorway detail I talked about earlier! What do you think it is?? Decorative, a vent, a speaker??

As for the design of the room, what’s not to love? It’s beautifully curated vintage furniture.

Last but not least, the stairway landing.

Emily obviously loved the fact that the railing poles went directly into the wood.

Ryann was super curious about those pendants. We felt that with the owner’s tech background that they really vibed with that side of him.

Well, that’s all folks! It was so fun going through these photos together and hearing everyone’s thoughts. This home is incredible and needless to say Jane Hallworth is beyond talented and such a thoughtful designer.

But what do you think?! Let’s chat.

Love you, mean it.

Credits: Design by Jane Hallworth | Styled by Michael Reynolds | Photos by Sam Frost | via Architectural Digest

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Femke
1 year ago

Such a beautifully designed house! I’m pretty sure the pendants on the stairway landing are Shylights by Studio Drift.

Kimberly
1 year ago
Reply to  Femke

YES! I was thinking that I saw them in Paris but you’re right, they were in Amsterdam at the. Rijks Museum.

i was obsessed with this house when i saw it the other day on AD. i have SO many thoughts. but i have to run, so i will come back later to deep dive into every one. but my biggest thought is that i’ve bought and sold so many unique vintage pieces of furniture over the year and now i’m totally kicking myself and wish i had hoarded them because my favorite thing about this house is how unique and special every single thing is! gah! sellers remorse.
i love this post idea. i’m noticing so many more things this time around.
okay, brb much later.

Peby
1 year ago

Those pendants over the stairs aren’t lights — or only lights: they’re an art installation by Dutch artists Studio Drift, called Shylight. I was able to see a bunch of them in action at the Stedelijk Museum a few years back. They are mesmerizing, but noisy when they move. (https://www.studiodrift.com/work#/work/shylight/)

HH
1 year ago
Reply to  Peby

Thank you for sharing! Those are crazy beautiful and I’d love to see them in person. (At the museum, not this house, lol.)

Kj
1 year ago
Reply to  HH

Wow, what amazing craftsmanship and engineering.

Tumtum
1 year ago
Reply to  Peby

Thank you for sharing the info on the Shylight. I am completely in awe.

Caitlin
1 year ago

The plant in the bathroom is a Fan Aloe. The botanical name is Kumara plicatilis (if you want to get really geeky, it used to be Aloe plicatilis). It’s super common in gardens in Southern California.

Cassie
1 year ago

Loved this post style! More please!
I love sheep skins, but the many small ones is tough. Also on team “Monastery Chic” bed styling – low fuss, high comfort. Obviously the plants and vintage wood furniture pieces steal the show, but all of the upholstered chairs are insane gorgeous too. I’m going to take a pass on the excessive marble. Just too ostentatious for me.

Reply to  Cassie

love this tour and all the art, plants, furniture, but totally agree on the marble. makes me sad to picture all of that being dug/mined out of the ground.

Susan
1 year ago

This house is lovely. Every shot and angle perfectly composed. Its seriously beautiful. What I had a hard time envisioning was LIVING in these spaces. If you add normal human things like a box of tissue, wrappers from your snack, a can of lacroix or your lap top or shoes or a messy dog, or you move the perfectly placed stools so you can prop your feet up, all of the sudden it feels like a museum that was messed up by humans using it. Just me? Also, I’m guessing you would have to hire someone just to tend the plants. The plants are all so unique and perfectly suited to their containers, can you imagine accidentally killing one? It would ruin the whole room. Am I just too pragmatic? Loved this format of all of you chiming in with each image. Well done

Eliot
1 year ago
Reply to  Susan

I totally agree! Initially I found myself thinking of the havoc my kids and pets would wreak on the place, but reading your comment makes me realize that I would probably wreak my own share of havoc, just by being a fallible person with a body. I wouldn’t be able to walk into that office without kicking a few of the sheepskins out of place, and I’d never read any of the artfully stacked books for fear of disrupting the visual harmony. It’s all such a joy to contemplate from a safe distance though.

Rachel
1 year ago
Reply to  Susan

Same. Love each individual piece. Love the art. Love love love love love the plants and the planters and the gorgeous windows. Wouldn’t do all marble for me but I’m so blown away by the craftsmanship and effect that I’ll endorse. But it’s so perfectly curated that it lacks a certain….humanity. All I can think of is the time my tween binged Christmas cookies and then vomited SPECTACULARLY all over our dining room, kitchen, and living room. Like as he tried to get to the bathroom he’d bump into things and then just barf again. It was so impressive and so not suited to this house. My vintage Turkish rugs could handle it, but not the many sheep clouds. I have no idea if they have kids or dogs but if they do there will be a) a spectacular vomit shesh and b) a just impressive diarrhea-y dog situation.

But gorgeous. Downright art.

Susan
1 year ago
Reply to  Rachel

This made me laugh so hard. Dog and 3 males teen/20 kids here. They aren’t slobs at all but they do live and your story made me feel bad and snort coffee at the same time!

Eliot
1 year ago
Reply to  Rachel

It is so distressing to hear that even tweens wander around vomiting. Mine are under five, and I had sort of hoped that the effluvia would slow down some time in the next decade and we’d be able to have nice things again.

sg5785
1 year ago
Reply to  Susan

This is so surprising – I didn’t get that vibe from this house at all. Yes, the sheepskins will be messy, but the rest? Soft surfaces, a lot of places to leave things around. I think people have an irrational fear of how kids destroy spaces, but in fact the more put-together a space is, the harder it is to destroy its harmony, kids or no kids. I did my kids’ playroom all in white fabrics – sofas, rugs, bookcases, sheepskins on the floor (!) everything – and everyone thought I was crazy. But 7 years later, we have realized it is easy to clean, full of light, and never looks messy regardless of how you move things around. The same, I feel, with this house. The color palette is so overpowering, I feel that it would absorb most “mess” easily. These spaces are so huge, you would need to unload truckloads of toys to mess them up. No, kids are not my problem; paying for the mortgage for this house is another matter…

Susan
1 year ago
Reply to  sg5785

Its not so much the mess for me, it’s that adding humanity to the room would spoil the museum quality of it and feel incongruous with the high end design. I’ll bet your all white room is lovely and a joy for you and the kids. And it sounds like you designed it to be heavily used, which is the point of a kids play room. This house looks more like it was designed to be admired and looked at. I thought of my dumpy middle aged body trying to sprawl on that marble lounger and totally spoiling the effect of how pretty it is and then having difficulty getting up because my abs are shot. 🙂

Soliterra
1 year ago
Reply to  Susan

Agreed! Especially the distance between seating and end/coffee tables. Who wants to get up to put a drink down? The proximity is off to me. But so much great, unique, and interesting stuff here!

Kathryn
1 year ago

This is so fun! Please do other “transcript” posts of the team talking thru amazing house tours!

Eliot
1 year ago
Reply to  Kathryn

Yes, this would make a great regular feature! I usually just race through the pictures of Arch Digest tours, and I love the way this forced me to slow down and really immerse myself in this space and absorb the design.

1 year ago
Reply to  Kathryn

Yes, I loved reading this! Sharing your thoughts on what you are seeing is really great, it makes me slow down and consider what I am looking at. A suggestion on a format for doing this, would be a slide show of the photos with you talking about what you are seeing in the photo showing. You could even add close up of the photos to show the details you were specifically talking about.

Or perhaps as a recorded zoom meeting which would show you each talking AND you could edit out what you decide not to include or even add to in the editing process.

This was really cool and interesting – thank you!

margaret
1 year ago

Good morning – contrarian here. This is a beautiful museum, not a home. So many lovely-looking details that would be annoying (or worse) to live with. Who wants to sit on that chair by the vanity? And that marble lounge chair? And what about that gorgeous hubba hubba chair? It looks like it would make you lean back, but then what is your head supposed to do? Just flop around awkwardly? That bed looks about as comfy as the marble slab. All that white in places where it’s virtually guaranteed to be spoiled . . . just rolling my eyes. And it looks like they’d be living in near-darkness in some of these rooms after the sun sets (which I guess would hide the stains on all the white carpets and chairs). Truly great design marries beauty and practicality. This gets only half that equation right.

shauna
1 year ago
Reply to  margaret

I would agree…. are you supposed to sit on that hay bale chair?!

Samantha
1 year ago
Reply to  shauna

I grew up in the country and have sat on hale bales as a kid, so as an adult I say : 1/5 would not recommend.

Eleanor
1 year ago

Just want to say this blog post was on my Apple News feed today – so cool! Anyway, really cool house — love all the plants/planters and the finishes. Some features may not be practical for everyday living but if you can afford a house like this, I’m pretty sure they can afford round the clock servants to clean, light up the candles, etc. And they may have a “dirty kitchen” too where the real cooking happens – hence the smaller “just-for-show” kitchen.

Kj
1 year ago
Reply to  Eleanor

I didn’t have this one, but I did have a link to Orlando’s holiday decorated cabin: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/inside-orlando-sorias-holiday-decorated-cabin

Briana
1 year ago

Beautiful! I’d love to know more about how to source and style a narrow dining table

Nancy
1 year ago

Dropping in to encourage more posts like this, please! I love looking at beautiful homes – that’s why we’re all here, right? – but hearing the different perspectives from the team really added to this home tour for me (even though I live with two big dogs and a messy husband so much of this wouldn’t work for us). Loved it!

Amanda
1 year ago

UUUUUUUUUUUUGH SO GOOD – love something DIFFERENT! the chair in that last photo THO is BEYOND

Nora
1 year ago

Just popping in to say that I love this kind of post! Eye candy and your commentary – and I love that disco ball too 🙂

Megan
1 year ago

I love seeing this, but how are you getting around the copyright issue here and directly publishing these photos? Don’t the photos belong to AD? AD’s website specifically prohibits use without written permission? Did AD give Emily Henderson design permission to use their photos?

AzureSongLA
1 year ago
Reply to  Megan

I’m sure they would argue that it is an editorial use that constitutes fair use.

Victoria
1 year ago

Eh, not for me. Specific pieces are beautiful and some of the architecture (and yeah okay, the plants and planters are A+) but most of those shots don’t even make it to a beautiful room for me, let alone somewhere I would want to live. No thank you.

priscilla
1 year ago

I’m dead, it’s so sick,

Christina
1 year ago

A lot of this house is beautiful though impractical but WHAT THE ACTUAL F is that haystack of a chair (I’m guessing)?

Lauren
1 year ago
Reply to  Christina

I know! I was looking for commentary explaining that one!

Samantha
1 year ago

This house is absolutely dreamy! It is beautifully curated and just about design perfect. But I don’t see living it it, at least not for me and my family. It is a perfect house to use as inspiration I think.

Jared M
1 year ago

More of these kinds of posts please!!

Mariele
1 year ago

In the slang of the times…
“Thanks, I hate it”.

Jessica
1 year ago

We have the affordable knock-off version of those dining room chairs. They’re amazing and so comfortable to go from dinner to drinks to games without anyone needing to shift to another space.

RuthAnn
1 year ago
Reply to  Jessica

What are they called? Thanks

Kj
1 year ago
Reply to  RuthAnn

They are Hans Wegner Kennedy chairs. Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/Wegner-Replica-Kennedy-Italian-Leather/dp/B077MZWKML/

Julie S
1 year ago

This was surprisingly interested to look/read through. I’m so happy to find out that you guys do ask questions like if they really ever light the chandelier candles, and that marble door has to be extraordinarily heavy/require a feat of engineering to function!

Marisa
1 year ago

Great post. Combines two of my fave things.

1 year ago

Years ago, I found and fell in love with a set of eight vintage Louis XVI oval back dining chairs, but they were all armchairs. I bought them anyway and had them refinished and reupholstered, and to this day they make my heart sing! Just like another reader commented, our guests really linger after dinner because the armchairs are so comfortable, and there’s no need to move to another room. Big fan of all armchairs at the dining table forevermore!
By the way, loved this post – so much fun hearing all your thoughts and I also loved reading everyone’s comments. I agree Jane Hallworth is amazingly talented, but also can’t imagine living in this home.

Christina Schroeder
1 year ago

Beautiful and inspiring curation with so many beautiful moments, but I personally can’t see daily life here.
I am puzzled by the lighting. Very few lamps and no ceiling lights. It looks like there might be lighting above the drapes? But where are the main light sources?
Also, as a tech titan I imagine he entertains a lot. I just can’t see it in this space.
The marble bathroom is too much for me. Starts to feel like a tomb.

Kimberly
1 year ago

im fairly positive that those pendants are from an art installation at a museum in Paris. They open and close and look like floating jellyfish. Super cool.

Kate
1 year ago

That was fun! You can do more of this, I was riveted. Like gossip, but the best kind 🙂

1 year ago

Yes, I loved reading this! Sharing your thoughts on what you are seeing is really great, it makes me slow down and consider what I am looking at. A suggestion on a format for doing this, would be a slide show of the photos with you talking about what you are seeing in the photo showing. You could even add close up of the photos to show the details you were specifically talking about.

Or perhaps as a recorded zoom meeting which would show you each talking AND you could edit out what you decide not to include or even add to in the editing process.

I would love to see this as a regular feature, this was really cool and interesting – thank you!

Christa
1 year ago

This post is fun! I like the plants/planters, vintage wood pieces and use of scale. I think the all-marble bathroom is over the top but that tub is stunning. The marble bench niche thing is just vulgar and seems uncomfortable. I do love a lot of this design but it’s hard to see people spending that kind of $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ on bathroom walls when most people who use their app can barely pay rent.

Ashlea
1 year ago

I swooned when I saw the kitchen. I like to imagine that there is a hidden skylit walk-in pantry that extends behind the range (I believe there is a door to the left of it). Then they can hide all the daily use machines that normally clutter kitchen countertops. Re: the dining room lighting, I think it is uber romantic when the candles on the chandelier are lit. Especially if they have a pretty mirror on the opposite wall that wasn’t shown (with the cool screen and table lamp). The soft light and reflection could be enough to create a really cool vibe. My only concern is wax dripping on heads, food, etc. Such a cool house.

E E Deere
1 year ago

The screen in the dining room made my heart go pitter pat. I covet it. The crazy chandelier/art above the table is great. The plants and their pots, to me, add to a sort of Pacific Rim vibe I like.
What I don’t like is when arty interiors demand that humans conform to the design. The shearling clouds-on-the-floor is a concept, but: how does one move one’s chair toward the desk? How does anyone with a balance problem navigate the floor lumps? (But then I thought, tech giants shape our behavior all the time, maybe it’s appropriate.)
The first reaction I had to the marble bathroom was how much of a nonrenewable resource was put into a room that is bound to be dated pretty fast. But maybe that’s because it wasn’t to my taste.
I enjoyed hearing the Henderson team conversation, for sure.

Katy
1 year ago

Wowwwww. I’m dead. This is the best house….I’ve ever seen. It’s just on a whole other level. Incredible. If I won the lottery, I know who I’d be calling to design my new dream home…

Bev
1 year ago

This house would not make me happy! I’d probably be running around misting the plants all day. Was fun going
through it with all of you, however!

Shannon
1 year ago

I LOVED this deep dive commentary post! Definitely do this again!!

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