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Our Kids Shared Bathroom Design Plan – A Tile Border? A Dresser As Vanity? And Just Maybe Not Enough Storage…

She’s a big post today – full of vintage dressers-turned-vanities, a tile “border” (!!), and a claw foot tub. Today we have the official kids shared bath design plan for you and now that it’s 2 months away from use (ACK) I can tell you firsthand that it’s going to be so awesome (scroll to see sneak peeks). It’s in the hall, on the second floor, shared by a 6-year-old girl and 8-year-old boy who have no idea how much their mom has sweated over this bathroom for them. They both agreed on “green” and that’s where we started…

The Original Bathroom

The upstairs bathroom had a nice layout before its latest renovation in the 80s or 90s, which we were able to work with…this is ALWAYS the goal with bathroom renovations because as soon as you start moving plumbing your budget takes a nice hit, so we were thrilled. They had redone it in the 90s and they did a tasteful job. Admittedly this bathroom could have been just updated, but once we looked closely there were some quality issues with the tile install (not a big deal, but a pet peeve of ARCIFORM) and for me I selfishly wanted it to go with the rest of the house. Once we realized that the whole house was to be gutted for all new electrical and plumbing, we felt that this room should be updated too. I’ll be honest in saying that this is not the earth-friendly decision to make, but it’s simply what we wanted to do. It just didn’t feel like it was of the same quality as the rest of the house. Hopefully, we can all agree (ha) that we made the right decision.

We kept the identical layout to A. save money and B. because we liked it.

We also felt that having a separate bath and shower is cute (and my preference) and it seemed right for two kids (even if they don’t bathe at the same time – we designed this bath when the kids were 4 and 6 so hilariously now that they are 6 and 8 we have exited the era of shared baths or showers). I love an enclosed shower room, and a freestanding tub, obviously – not only is this visually the most interesting, but it feels vintage and sweet.

We were able to salvage and donate the toilet, pedestal sink, and medicine cabinet and we are reusing the tub somewhere special that I can’t wait to tell you about (it involves a hose and cold plunging).

The Layout

Since we weren’t relocating any fixtures and plumbing we were left with focusing on the aesthetic design vs. layout design. We knew we wanted it to be a little whimsical but still simple, airy, and quiet. The kids were insistent on color so we brought in this dark green they both loved.

With our wish list in hand, ARCIFORM came back with the first round of designs. I knew I wanted to do this elongated picket from Pratt + Larson because it mimicked the diamond pattern in the original windows.

First Round Of Designs

It was a LOT of tile in that picket shape that I felt mimicked the diamond pattern of the original windows on the second floor. The windows in this room were simple and on the smaller side so we had plans to customize them to be more special.

There was a lot to love from the first round of designs but we wanted and NEEDED to change a few things. This is typical…So often something that looks FANTASTIC in your mind’s eye but doesn’t land when put to paper (or computer) so this back and forth process of plans and renders is so helpful.

The Custom Window Debate

The window on the left is not original to the house, but it’s real wood from the 1990s when they renovated (we think) and in fine condition. They might have added the one behind the tub as it’s kinda awkward from the exterior (but there weren’t really architects back in the day to help guide those decisions so maybe that was the original location from 1910). As we were designing this room I really wanted bigger better windows (this is a pattern with me) and I wanted them to match the wood of the original windows that we were keeping. Anne helped design these stunning windows in the renderings and I obviously approved them. We sent them off to be quoted by their other company Versatile, who would have executed them to match the originals. We know that super customized windows can be VERY expensive, so when they came back at $5k each we should have not been surprised. So we thought about it for a cool 10 minutes and realized that this room would be beautiful either way and that we simply didn’t have $10k in the budget to spend on windows in our CHILDREN’S bathroom. So while I was sad to see them go, and I think the room would have been more beautiful with them, we simply couldn’t do it. Also installing new windows isn’t free either – so it would have cost another $1k – $2500 in labor to reframe the wall to handle larger windows and then install them. No new windows in this room (and yes at times I regret not finding a vintage diamond picture window for behind the bathtub like I did for a couple other spaces – oh well).

A Bathtub Niche

We also brought the tile down to the height of a wood railing (about 3/4ths up the wall). We felt that this just broke it up and allowed us to have a peg rail in certain areas of the room.

YES, there is a tile border on the bottom, almost like a baseboard…but with teeth 🙂 I came up with this idea a year and a half ago – to bring the floor up into the wall a bit and give it a bit of whimsy. Sometimes I fear that some of my early ideas live in a different house now, but other times I’m so excited to have some rooms look more special with some risks. In-person we love it (head to Instagram stories to check it out).

Now that I’m looking at the niche with the curtains it does seem like it’s going to be crowded in there, hmmm, but I can always nix the curtain. I could have kept it open without the casing around the opening to create the niche but I like the idea of it being a little cozier. We’ll see 🙂 Right now that curtain looks super boring but I have plans for it to make it fun and whimsical.

Shower Room

The Vintage Vanity

We talk a lot about design rules and how sometimes you need to break them. This is because when done right, the unexpected design choice can be the one that makes the whole design feel special, feel GAH! So, that being said, we have this vintage chest, and as you can see it has gotten A LOT of love and use in our home over the years. It’s pine, with sweet little key holes and for whatever reason, I decided a year ago to make it our vanity. It’s going to be SO CUTE, if not a little impractical (not a ton of storage) but they’ll live.

Now some of you may have a hard time with what you are about to see…so prepare yourselves. We had Jamie from ARCIFORM template out a space for an undermount sink, cut a hole in the top of the dresser, and brace a sink from below. I promise it will be worth it!!! We will lose the full use of the top drawer and 1/2 of the second drawer to house the sink and plumbing, but will still have storage for the everyday items in the sides of the second and bottom drawers. I hope. How much storage do kids actually need right???

One of the many things we love about this piece is the curved corners and beveled edge and we wanted to figure out a way to keep that profile. Enter Anne with a clever and cool idea. She suggested we KEEP the original top and ADD a stone top with the same curved corners and beveled edges but inset 1/2″ creating a tiered effect/a RAD but subtle design moment. I also REALLY wanted a stone backsplash somewhere in this house because it is so classically “English Farmhouse” and this bathroom was the only one that stylistically made sense (but we have gone back and forth on this).

Since the top is so special we felt the backsplash should be too, initially the design had it going the length of the vanity with a small curved shelf ledge at the top like this …

It didn’t feel quite right, so then Brian had a great idea during one of our design meetings that everyone agreed worked…so this is the final backsplash design…special, unique, and works so much better with the lines of the room. We had a momentary red flag this week that we’d need to nix the stone backsplash as it might push the wall-mounted faucet out too far but Jamie re-measured and we are all good. We could absolutely have had the faucet come straight out of the tile but this way it looks more like a basin, like a found piece.

The stone for the top and backsplash is a beautiful calm Carrarra Marble from BEDROSIAN. We went back and forth on what type of material to use and ultimately decided although it is a natural material that will require some care and maintenance, marble would really look the best. I do want to warn you that there is VERY little counter space. We’re going to add some vintage wall mount cup holders for toothbrushes/toothpaste and Elliot might need a vanity in her room when she gets older. Likely going to get a train rack for above the toilet to add storage, too.

Medicine Cabinet/Mirror

The way they framed behind the vanity wall only allowed for a 14″ wide medicine cabinet and we didn’t want to have to reframe and re-drywall (and there are so few medicine cabinets that wide) so we nixed it and will find a mirror. Stay tuned on that.

Kids Design Plan Product Board

1. Fairview Two-Light Wall Sconce | 2. Eastmoreland 4″ Fitter Semi-Flush Fixture | 3. Kohler Kathryn Toilet | 4. Tolson Wall Mount Faucet | 5. Tolson Toilet Paper Holder | 6. Tolson Single Hook | 7. Lewis Push-Button Switchplate | 8. Double-Ended Clawfoot Tub | 9. Tolson Single Towel Bar | 10. Large Picket Tile

The lighting and plumbing are all from Rejuvenation and I love how playful this Tolson line is (while still being solid). The tub is not silver – it’s brass. We have a herringbone on the floor of the bath, a hex on the floor of the shower, and an elongated picket throughout (in green and white). All from Pratt and Larson.

I’m loving how it’s coming together and I have a few surprise design elements.

That border in person is a real surprising yet subtle moment that I’m so glad we did. I almost nixed it a few months ago, worried that this bathroom would be really different than the others, but the tile and the plumbing all work together, so doing an element like this is just extra fun for a kids bath.

I feel like I’ve shown you too much but don’t worry – again, we have a few surprise elements. Besides I’m sure that many of you are going to be very curious if this whole tile border thing will actually work IRL. Here’s to taking some design risks and hoping they pay off!

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JM
19 days ago

Did you consider eliminating the tub and adding a second vanity?

Dawn Neditch
19 days ago
Reply to  JM

Yes! That is exactly my thought when I saw the plans.

Julie
19 days ago
Reply to  Dawn Neditch

As someone who shared a bathroom with 2 siblings growing up I am confused by this layout. I agree with JM and Dawn. Seems like a shower with double vanity and plenty of space as the kiddos grow would be my #1 priority. There’s no counter space?! For a kids bathroom, I find this confusing.

Lane
18 days ago
Reply to  Julie

Perhaps it’s less to argue about, but also a lost opportunity to learn how to problem solve and compromise. Most families have one bathroom. Having three is great. The bedrooms are also big to hold or all their stuff. You don’t want to make their lives too great because they might struggle finding a first place to live on their entry level salary

Karen
16 days ago
Reply to  Julie

No storage is a big mistake. I would get rid of the tub and put in a big vanity with lots of usable drawers. I personally find the tile too busy. I would experiment in a powder room but not a kid’s bath. This is high use room- just wait until they’re teens.

Lillie
19 days ago
Reply to  JM

ime, 90% of morning and bedtime arguments are eliminated by 2 sinks. Source: Mom of teens temporarily living with single vanity bathroom after a decade of double vanities.

Jackie
19 days ago
Reply to  Lillie

This discussion is so interesting because we are remodeling our house and every single builder we’ve interviewed (many with kids of their own) has recommended against double sinks — but I guess none of them were designers!

Kate
16 days ago
Reply to  Jackie

I would truly love to hear their reasoning why!

Sherrie
18 days ago
Reply to  Lillie

well said. 1000% agree. Emily – you need to design for TEENAGERS. Starts around age 10 or 11.

michaela
19 days ago
Reply to  JM

Don’t forget, there’s also a guest bathroom on this floor. As they get older, they could each have their own bathroom (until there’s actually a guest visiting.)

Deborah
17 days ago
Reply to  michaela

There’s going to be a guest house on the property as well, right? So, eventually, when the kiddos want bathroom privacy, they’ll be able to rearrange the upstairs so one has an en-suite and the other has this bathroom. There’s even room for a shared play space! My kids are just a little older than Emily’s, and it’s so nice to have an out-of-the-way spot for them to work on big LEGO/circuit/art creations over a several-day period. This property gives them that option down the road.

jamie
18 days ago
Reply to  JM

Ninety percent of the items that are filling my bathroom drawers and cabinets could be eliminated and would cause me so much less grief while looking for the one item I want. I think with kids a bath is really nice to have, otherwise they would be in Emily’s bath like at the mountain house. . A dressing table in the bedroom can house hair product and hair dryers etc….less time in the bathroom, less arguing. Also, there is a guest bath upstairs too. Not a big deal. I raised 4 kids and they shared a single sink. They made it work. Also, I love the repurposed vanity/dresser. That bathroom is going to be beautiful.

Kerri
19 days ago

LOVE the tile border!!!

Vera
19 days ago

I love everything Emily! I actually like the simpler windows – they still look special because of the trim, and the open glass provides a resting place for the eye.
It’s all perfect. Especially the final vanity and backsplash design. (Way to go Brian!)

Evee
19 days ago

What is a train rack that would give above a toilet?

Karen Patton
19 days ago
Reply to  Evee

Mine is a chrome wall mounted shelf with a towel rack hanging from the bottom, much like a luggage rack in an old fashioned train. I can store two sets of towels on the shelves & hang towels from the rack.

Aly
17 days ago
Reply to  Karen Patton

Google ‘toilet plume’ and have a look at the videos of how far those poop and pee particles fly. 😕

Rebecca Lemon
19 days ago
Reply to  Evee

I had to google it! It’s kind of a shelf made of spaced bars?

Ellie
18 days ago
Reply to  Evee

I always think storage above a toilet seems a little bit risky…. especially in a kids’ bathroom….

Eleanor
19 days ago

Everything is beautiful, of course. My observations are on function alone. There does not seem to be much storage. When the kids get bigger, they will have a lot more products. Do the kids take baths? If not, why not a bigger shower/more counter space? And can the shower be all glass on 2 walls — it seems a bit claustrophobic now.

Lane
18 days ago
Reply to  Eleanor

I think it’s easier to bathe kids than to shower. Also a bath is not a true full bathroom without a tub.

emily jane
19 days ago

loving absolutely everything!

Karen Patton
19 days ago

I’m curious where the cluttery stuff of bathroom use will be stored. The shampoo & conditioner bottles, body wash, hair ties, bandaids, hair dryers, combs, brushes, sunscreen, and as the teen years hit, skin care products, hair styling products, body spray, shoot those weird blue light face masks will go.

I adore the cute vanity, but I have to reserve it for the powder or guest room. In kid’s bathrooms I want lots of storage and I want it out of sight. (Love medicine cabinets!)

Shannon
19 days ago

Ahhhh, love it all. And I savored every second of reading this post! It’s fascinating to learn how you arrived at each design choice. That vanity is so perfect! And the tile border, so simple and sweet yet impactful. It reminds me a bit of grass, which I love for a kids’ bath. You DID NOT share too much!!!

Erin Dae
19 days ago

I love the tile border, but I am hoping that the pickets line up better than they do in the rendering. If it is not the exact same tile just in a different colorway, it might end up looking janky if they don’t line up nicely. But the idea of it is amazing and so “quietly innovative” that I can’t wait to see it IRL. Also love the final design for the backsplash. Elegant yet simple.

Gretchen
19 days ago

The tile work is really amazing! I love the 3/4 height and little border with the teeth. Not sure about the curtain, but you’ll see how it feels once it’s hanging up, cozy vs claustrophobic.

Roberta Davis
19 days ago

It has a really nice, cozy, farm-housey feel! And the kids got to have some say in the design with the colors!

sally
19 days ago

Love it, so beautiful and purposeful. I do like the old tile and am sad it’s leaving and hope you can recycle but the new bathroom is so special and gorgeous and feels super appropriate with the house.

Erin
19 days ago

Your vanity is going to be so incredible, I can’t wait to see it installed, love where you landed. The tile border is a great idea! We did this in our walk-in shower and it makes the shower look bigger because it’s like a continuation of the floor-good for smaller spaces. Lucky kids, they will figure out the storage situation.

🥰 Rusty
19 days ago

I love the ‘teeth’ border on the tile! It makes it unique. 🦷 I love that you turned the chest of drawers into a wash stand with the marble top, too! I wonder if you might have found a marble top wash stand in an antique store though, for heaps less work?? They’re a ‘thing’ and they’re out there. But yours is, again, unique and made specially for your two middle-sized kids. (HOW are they growing up so fast!?!?) I especially like the handles on the faucet. I’d have those in a heartbeat. ❣ Ha! I noticed that your guest full bath is exactly my bathroom layout (tiny!) Except mind has the shower over tgd0 bath (I don’t love that part). And that’s my only bathroom in my little 2 bedroom cottage! There’s a separate guest room outside and the original outdoor loo (toilet) as we Aussies call them, back from nearly 100 yrs ago (in pristine flushing condition!). I painted the door a wild, turquoise-y colour, with a white off-centre ‘moon’. Then I screwed on a handmade leadlight spider in a web (like Chatlotte’s Web) just over the one side of the moon. It’s pretty cool!😁 I think the… Read more »

Jae
19 days ago

Couldn’t your carpenter build you a medicine cabinet with the right dimensions? They are pretty simple and you could have a mirror cut with beveled glass to fit the door, and also add a vintage knob. Our carpenter did this in our new bathroom which I designed with his & hers medicine cabinets that are SUPER useful. It’s a great place to stash little odds & ends and clutter like toothbrushes for quick access.

19 days ago

I think this is beautiful but I do think you will want to consider more storage, especially if you’re not giving them a medicine cabinet. Your kids are young now but I can promise you that they’ll need more as they reach teenage years!

Cris S.
19 days ago
Reply to  Daria

Ultimately, the “kid’s bathroom” in our house became my daughter’s room and her younger brother ended up with his stuff in our bathroom. She’s going to college this fall and I look forward to evicting him back to ‘her’ bathroom.

L
19 days ago

Personally, I think all of the new tile & enclosed spaces make the room feel smaller & a bit claustrophobic, not to mention it allows no room for growth- of your kids or their stuff. Respectfully, if this is indeed your forever home (or even home for the next 10 years) you aren’t designing the room for a 6 & 8 year old- you’re designing it for future tweens & teens. If you weren’t designing to preserve any of the original fixtures or elements, I would’ve thought storage & room to spread out a little would’ve been top priority in the new space. In all your discussions, did you ever consider losing the tub? You could’ve enlarged the shower, put in a double vanity where the tub sits and built in a small closet where the floor already steps back at the pedestal sink (next to the toilet).

Gwoman
19 days ago
Reply to  L

Exactly what I was thinking. Where does all the stuff go? Within a couple of years, the children will have much different needs within the bathroom. There doesn’t seem to be any thought given to that. Even though it is a small bathroom, it can be both beautiful and functional. Growing up, we had one bathroom for our entire family of six. Although it was much smaller than this one, we still had plenty of storage for towels, personal items for each of us, cleaning supplies, etc. Full size cabinet under the sink for laundry basket and cleaning supplies, extra large medicine cabinet for dad’s /razors, mom’s beauty supplies, etc. Large to the ceiling cabinet over the toilet for kids’ stuff, extra soap, and towels. Two towel racks in easy reach of the tub/shower. And my mom made it look great with tile wainscoting, paint, custom shower curtain. The bathroom was small but very functional and beautiful. It can be done with attention first to the function followed by attention to the looks. This, along with some other decisions, make me think this house will never be Emily’s forever home. There are just too many things done for looks and… Read more »

mouseface
19 days ago
Reply to  L

Yeah I really agree about the tile closing the place in. And I see the lack of storage as a a big issue. I am currently a single person with a similar amount of storage in a bathroom and no medicine cabinet and it’s NOT good. In this rendering there are not even rods to hold wet towels or niches for shampoos in the shower. I think of your motto that systems prevent chaos… This bathroom really does not seem suited to accommodate the kids as they age . If this is going to be a workhorse bathroom for two siblings , IMHOP it needs way more storage and serious attention to function. A combined shower and bath would let you build a double vanity with his and hers sinks, power outlets, a large medicine cabinet, and a linen cabinet recessed into the wall. In the blink of an eye they will need storage for first aid stuff, skin care, period stuff, extra towels, hairdryers, lotions, beauty and cleaning supplies. If you don’t have storage for them it is a setup for either always have a highly messy and chaotic bathroom or for one of them to usurp the guest… Read more »

Shannon
19 days ago
Reply to  L

One of the kids can always take over the guest bath if it becomes an issue

Liz
18 days ago
Reply to  Shannon

I agree – that one of the kids can do that and probably will but on the other hand what a luxury to have your own bathroom! Like many other commenters I grew up in a 1 bathroom household for 4 people and it worked fine. However upon saying that I have 1 teenage son who has his own bathroom and I must say he has his ‘everyday products’ (and there are a few including aftershave etc) on the vanity in baskets – why? As he is so lazy/absent-minded that he wouldn’t use the stuff that he needs regularly, especially as he has oily skin and should use cleansers etc, if in drawers.
I think that you have created a gorgeous space and your kids are lucky to have their own bathroom! I personally would prefer more storage but you know your family and what works for you! So enjoy that space you have created – love love the vanity.

Amber
18 days ago
Reply to  L

I believe Emily said she was keeping the plumbing the same for budget reasons, hence the same locations for the shower and tub.

L
18 days ago
Reply to  Amber

My suggestion to put the sink/vanity where the tub currently sits would’ve utilized the current plumbing with minimal change.

L
18 days ago
Reply to  Amber

My suggestion to move the sink/vanity to where the tub currently sits would’ve utilized the existing plumbing with minimal change.

Kate
19 days ago

I am very, very wary of how little storage there is in the bathroom. Both kids will need personal care products, one or both of them will probably want a hair dryer (and/or other styling tools), teen boys will be shaving and need space for those items…and it looks like all of that is going to get shoved down into 1.5 small drawers?

I know you said you’re nixing a medicine cabinet, but a cabinet that has outlets inside and storage for personal care products really seems necessary here. These kids are going to need a place to put their stuff and I think it’s going to end up piled all over the small counter of the sink when it comes to day to day living in that space.

Trixie
19 days ago
Reply to  Kate

Agree with this — I had to share a small bathroom with my two girls and when they were teenagers it was always a disaster — and we had way more storage than this. Teenagers (even boys) have lots of stuff. IDK, maybe it can be like a college dorm where you cart your stuff back and forth from your room in a shower caddy 😉 I love Emily’s ideas, but sometimes I think the cool “moments” trump the functionality. Like those short closet doors in the kid’s rooms. She literally said “Oh, it’s so cute and they’re kids, so it doesn’t matter.” Um, those kids are gonna grow faster than you think. How is a potentially 6′ teenage boy gonna feel about those teeny doors? Not practical. And even if it isn’t their “forever” home, who is to say that those rooms will always be kid’s rooms?

Shannon
18 days ago
Reply to  Trixie

The kids’ closet doors aren’t THAT short, they’re 6’! It’s not a walk-in closet. What’s the big deal?

Sarah
19 days ago
Reply to  Kate

In a few years, I bet Emily’s daughter will end up taking over the guest bedroom and bath, while this bathroom becomes her son’s bath (and guest bath). Which would work just fine assuming they have guests infrequently!

This bathroom is stunning, but with little storage and one sink, it will be a difficult space to share daily between 2 tweens or teens.

Alex
19 days ago

A Dresser as Vanity? PLEASE NO! Or, give the kids a clean, water-safe, functional, vanity and put the old dresser in your bathroom. Your daugter will soon need LOTS of vanity space 🙂

Karen
19 days ago

Lots of comments on storage! Family of four here. We share a teenie tiny bathroom in a 1930’s house. It’s our ONLY bathroom and all 4 of us make it work just fine. The only stage that was annoying to me was when we had toddler bath toys. Looks like a good space to me, Emily

19 days ago
Reply to  Karen

Yes! More storage = more stuff. Less storage = less stuff (and more eco-friendly). It’s all lovely and perfect, Emily!

Amber
18 days ago
Reply to  Karen

I agree with this. Geez, how much stuff do people have? Emily also mentioned possibly getting a vanity for Birdie’s room, which would not only add storage, but allow her to get ready without hogging the bathroom. Seems like a great solution to me.

Angela
17 days ago
Reply to  Amber

OMG seriously! We had one very small bathroom for 6 people and storage was not a problem. We all just used the same shampoo, body wash, etc and as we got older, kept toiletries in our own bedrooms (also shared, also fine). I had a little stash of makeup in a Caboodle in my room, and kept deodorant and hairspray and curling irons on my dresser. I always feel a little sick reading these comments…like…have we (and our KIDS) all become THAT entitled? Plenty of people live 6 to a one room HUT and are fine. If your kids aren’t able to share a sink, the sink might not be the problem here.

L
17 days ago
Reply to  Angela

As someone who spoke up for more storage in the newly designed space, I gotta say the “entitlement” suggestion is very ironic. Emily’s kid’s are going to have their own washer & dryer, so I don’t exactly think the debate about lack of toilet paper storage is rooted in luxury/excess…but, quite the opposite, practicality. No one here is suggesting her kids can’t share this space…I grew up sharing a bathroom with my 2 sisters & my 3 kids share one smaller than this now. You make do with what you have & hopefully consider yourself very fortunate for whatever that is. The point is Emily is a designer (stylist) by trade…she didn’t have to “make do” with the existing bathroom & instead chose to gut it and do a total redesign. She is the one pointing out the lack of storage, before they even move in. I think many of these comments are in response to her “how much storage do kids actually need right???” & are simply pointing out that the need will only get greater as they age, not lessen. But I also think some are questioning the purpose of replacing every inch of a (already beautiful) room… Read more »

LouAnn
17 days ago
Reply to  Karen

Spot on. My family of four shared ONE tiny bathroom with zero counter space and storage and we managed to survive. OH THE HORROR OF IT ALL! 😉

People are so odd thinking that their need for vast amount of counters and cabinets is such a life or death matter for everyone.

Julie
19 days ago

I love the new but old vanity and marble combo! That’s going to be a really nice element and blend of new and old. 🙂 But as a mom myself, I’m also worried about the storage! I love hiding things quickly when guests come (ha ha) and drawers and cabinets are the perfect place to sweep things in. Totally agree with some sort of shelving above the toilet. And I’m not sure if your renderings are “exact”, but I would caution on putting the hand towel drying area (not pictured yet I think), over where the toilet paper holder will be. NO one wants to use wet TP. 😉

19 days ago

Just came here to say: it is really time to update that banner ad for the book on your first page!

Rebecca
19 days ago

I guess I’m a little confused why you didn’t do a double vanity? I still have PTSD flashbacks of growing up in a household of six people and having one (!) bathroom. The double vanity probably saved us from killing each other lol. Everything that you do is beautiful, but I feel like the spirit of the old bathroom was closer to the English countryside bathroom that you envisioned. I can’t quite see the end result yet, but excited to see the final version!

🥰 Rusty
18 days ago
Reply to  Rebecca

With respect, for someone with actual PTSD, it’s most unlikely that you have PTSD from sharing a bathroom.
Just sayin’. Please be careful in flippantly using serious terms.

And yes, EHD Team…go ahead and moderate my comment.
It’s ridiculous, but my truthful and not offensive comments have clearly dented someone’s ego.🤐
I feel like I’m wearing one of those mouth clenchers from Handmaid’s Tale, for fear of having an opinion that might question someone else’s perspective.

Debate is healthy. Censorship is not, unless there’s abuse, which is not the case with my comments.

Kara
18 days ago
Reply to  🥰 Rusty

I agree that we should be careful with terms like PTSD.

Rusty, if your comments are getting moderated out, I imagine it’s related to EHD’s relatively new comment policy this year found in this post:
https://stylebyemilyhenderson.com/blog/my-fresh-2022-outlook
Tone is hard to convey in text. It’s not about people’s egos getting hurt.

Admin
18 days ago
Reply to  Kara

no hurt egos – our spam filter is broken and we have to manually approve everything right now! we’re working on it – just takes us a minute to get through all of them 🙂

🥰 Rusty
17 days ago

Thank crikey goodness!

Canadian book editor
18 days ago
Reply to  🥰 Rusty

Rusty, I am forever appreciative of your comments! What I love most is your ability to gently encourage other perspectives without trodding down the ones presented; I always come away thinking “hmm,” and whether my mind is changed or not, I think there’s so much power in that consideration. Anyway, I don’t know that this helps here, but I want you to know that as a book editor this is something we’re really keen to tackle these days—unintentionally flippant uses of terms/phrases that have proven to perpetuate perspectives that aren’t useful anymore (or, worse, damaging). Sometimes it’s about words, other times it’s about characters’ behaviours. So your efforts are seen and heard and helpful here! Take care!

🥰 Rusty
17 days ago

Thank you🙂

Sophie
19 days ago

Don’t worry about the storage. People hoard so much more stuff than they need or use. I have one bathroom in my home which I share with my husband and baby, and the sole storage in that bathroom is a vanity unit very similar to yours, with two shelves in it (one of which has a pipe protruding into it). I manage to keep in there what feels to me like a vast number of beauty products, toilet paper, cleaning stuff, etc. We have a freestanding bath with a shower over the top of it and a nice metal rack lives on the bath with our daily bathing products in it. We keep spare towels with our linen.
America’s addiction to more is a problem! The fact that your children will have a bathroom to themselves is already a huge luxury.

L
19 days ago
Reply to  Sophie

I don’t think any of the comments suggesting the need for more storage are coming from a place of overconsumption or hoarding, but from friendly experience. It’s just a fact that the number of personal care products grows with your child… deodorant, styling products, feminine products, hair dryer/flat iron, etc. I think it’s great to keep the number of bath linens to a minimum but the other “stuff”will accumulate and unless you have a designated spot for it, it will take over every surface.

Lane
18 days ago
Reply to  L

Things like a hair dryer or flat iron shouldn’t go in the bathroom. Makeup can also be applied in the bedroom.

Ingrid
19 days ago
Reply to  Sophie

I agree, Sophie – it’s actually very helpful to have a space dictate how much room you have for personal items, and then adjust accordingly. I think of it as a natural curb on my “collecting” habits. Unlimited bathroom storage will just lead to unlimited amounts of stuff.

Kara
18 days ago
Reply to  Sophie

I’m with you, Sophie. “The fact that your children will have a bathroom to themselves is already a huge luxury.” Louder for the people in back!!!

These storage posts always make it clear who has had to live in a small place before in their life vs. who hasn’t. Is ample storage wonderful to have? Absolutely. Is it necessary? No. Will it be character building for these two kids to have to figure out how to make this space work and share it with another person? Yes, and based on what Emily has mentioned as her free range parenting philosophy, I have a feeling she won’t be so bothered by any fights the kids may have with each other over it.

L
18 days ago
Reply to  Kara

“These storage posts always make it clear who has had to live in a small space before in their life vs. who hasn’t.” That made me laugh! It’s quite an assumption & a huge misjudgment. I have 3 kids (including 2 teen girls) who share a bathroom even smaller than Emily’s. Maybe every commenter isn’t coming from a place of luxury or excess, but perhaps have tips or thoughts to share based on their small living experiences. The irony here is that nothing about this house design is “small space living” (even this bathroom) so I think cans of hairspray on the sink area will build more frustration than character.
I agree, a bathroom to themselves is a huge luxury in itself & maybe that’s why I personally couldn’t justify doing a whole gut job on a bathroom like this where you actually end up losing space- storage or other. Emily mentioned the lack of storage in the post title so it’s not just coming from the comments, it’s an issue she clearly acknowledges too. Unfortunately, the need for it will only get bigger as the kids do.

Kara
18 days ago
Reply to  L

Fair point re: those living in small spaces, L, and apologies for the broad assumption I made. I think it’s my perspective as someone who has shared very small bathrooms in a small spaces for most of my life to see how massive this house is, with 4 bathrooms and each kid having their own bedroom, that I don’t see the big issue with one of the bathrooms not having tons of storage. The house seems so adaptable to me as needs change, like storage does not have to be permanent. And you’re right, Emily said it lacks storage AND she said they’re doing all this because of aesthetics–everyone could see how nice the original bathroom was. I wouldn’t reno it either, like you, but my livelihood doesn’t depend on content creation. So when I read these comments after she made that very clear, I read them as “oh here are ways to make your kids’ lives as frictionless as possible,” which is 100% my personal perspective and thus why I brought up character building. But if you’re a reader coming from a perspective of practicality and making the most of all your spaces and “if I was paying all… Read more »

L
18 days ago
Reply to  Kara

Kara, no apologies necessary…I appreciate your thoughtful response.
I, too, have shared small bathrooms most of my life, though I didn’t really notice (or care much about) the functionality/organization of such spaces until I had my own home… & my own kids. Obviously all of us that come to this space either love Emily or love design (or both!) and realize that creating beautiful content is her job. As a firm believer that form & function can coexist, I have to admit I’m taken aback with posts like this where there is an obvious disclaimer of lack of functionality before the space is even finished. While I agree that there’s probably more than enough house to make up for the shortcomings in this shared bath, I also find myself asking “what’s the point then?” It just seems kind of silly to have a tiled fortress…yet nowhere to store the toilet paper.
Maybe it’s because of my small space living, but I love the Meta Coleman quote, “There’s a lot of creativity in limitations.”
I think there can be a lot of beauty, too. 🙂

Kara
18 days ago
Reply to  L

I absolutely agree with what you’re saying, L! It’s funny how our life perspectives color our reading of this post. I have 3 (young) kids and SO appreciate function even more now with all the stuff that comes with them. (Does the organizing ever end??) That being said, the house we lived in before we moved to our current one had only one bathroom, and it was the size of Emily Bowser’s. (No exaggeration, it was the exact same as hers except Jack and Jill style so we didn’t even have an third wall like she did. No surprise we wanted out of there ASAP.) Last year we moved into a house with two bathrooms and more storage than we know what to do with–we still have empty drawers in each. We feel like kings! But if I had a choice to make my kids share our new large-to-us hall bathroom or our old tiny bathroom, I would make them share the smaller one, even when they’re older and have more stuff. (Momster over here! I was also Team Don’t Add a Second Bathroom when Emily posted about the first iteration of the second floor of this house.) And it… Read more »

Professor
19 days ago

I love the design elements – I do. But as with everything in this blog these days, all designs loose their appeal for me if they are not functional and practical. I know that there are huge issues with moderation because I have seen many comments disappear and I very very rarely comment these days. So if Emily wants to kick me off this site that’s fine.. I will still write this comment. I have to ask Emily – what is the purpose behind your design? Is it to look good on instagram? Because it seems to me that this house is being designed a collection of vignettes that will photograph well.. and perhaps won’t be as livable? There is no coherence to what you are throwing into this house and honestly, I don’t understand your decisions. Both in terms of functionality or in terms of design. Are we shaker or Victorian? are we farmhouse or something else? No mudroom.. one impractical choice after another. This bathroom exemplifies the entire process behind the design of this house of Emily’s. My mind hurts from coming here – sorry 🙁 Most of us who come here are quite cerebral people, who like… Read more »

Ingrid
19 days ago
Reply to  Professor

To respond to your concerns about coherence, l think that dogmatic adherence to a single style is never a goal. The house doesn’t need to earn a label (100% Shaker, 100% Victorian, etc.). In fact, that kind of historic duplication would be even less convincing and frankly boring. Coherence comes from the elevated attention to detail that can be seen in every room here, and l love it!

Kate
18 days ago
Reply to  Ingrid

To chime in here, I really appreciate what an open book Emily makes of her design process, but the Portland house feels like too many cooks in the kitchen to me, too. The rate of expenditure in Emily and Brian’s renovations feels driven by their collaboration with Arcform, where there seems to be no limit to change orders in the budget and no surface is likely to go untouched. It is feeling really chaotic. There are aspects of this blog that are down to earth, inspiring, and relatable… that’s what keeps me loyal, but I do think that a collective breath might be taken on the Portland house. I’d really like to see Emily and Brian and the kids able to move in.

Kara
18 days ago
Reply to  Professor

Isn’t there a mudroom with like a dog shower? Also Emily is her own client, I definitely get the sense she’s designing to enhance her own life. She’s also said before how she has to make choices that are somewhat cutting edge or design forward because of her job, a big part of which is to trend on social media….and honestly I don’t think she has a problem with that. As readers I think we all should remember what her job is for this exact reason. Also it’s not up to us to determine if her choices are “an unappealing way to live,” it’s up to her and her family and they seem pretty happy to me.

Leah
18 days ago
Reply to  Professor

It’s so easy to read something, not like it, and move on! Seriously, why trash someone and their efforts publicly……oh wait, you haven’t left your name.

Sona
18 days ago
Reply to  Leah

Leah, very well put. I was thinking if she’s so put off by Emily’s blog these days she doesn’t have to read it.

🥰 Rusty
18 days ago
Reply to  Leah

Questioning, debating perspectives and even challenging a viewpoint or even ignorance, is not “trashing” someone.

Leah
17 days ago
Reply to  🥰 Rusty

Just re-read the comment and I propose we agree to disagree 🙂
Probably a great example of how the written word can be received so differently by different people.

Deborah
19 days ago

I love the deep green pickets coming up the wall as a boarder, they make me think of an evergreen tree line on a hill, perfect for the PNW! 🙂 I’m glad the tile does not go entirely up the wall, too much tile is cold, hard and echoes, the room has a LOT of hard surfaces so a bit of painted wall will be a relief and the tub curtains are a nice softening element too.
Like others above, concerned over the lack of storage, that seems to be a challenge that will be even more demanding as the kids become teens.
Using the kids old, pine chest as a vanity is a lovely use for that piece and topping it with marble and the other design elements is gorgeous!!
It’s going to be a wonderful bathroom!!

monica
19 days ago

Just chiming in with more dismay about the lack of storage for a space that is/was down to the studs.. Where will towels be hung to dry? That single hook next to the shower just won’t cut it! Also, I have two boys, now 19 and 22 – they used FAR MORE hair product and other things than I ever have, so don’t discount a boy needing space for his stuff as much as a girl. Agree that a shower is probably more useful than the tub, but a basic tub shower combo is tried-and-true space saver. Would be crazy not to add a medicine cabinet, no matter how shallow. Hope it all works out.

Kate
19 days ago

I love following along with your reno plans, but I think you can save a lot of money by scratching this update. As the person who scrubs the grout in our house, I really recommend pumping the brakes… this is A LOT of grout to scrub! Bathrooms are steamy and mildew will grow on those walls… you think it’s not going to be a big deal, but it is a really headache if you plan to stay in this house for a long time.

🥰 Rusty
18 days ago
Reply to  Kate

I don’t think they’re going to be scrubbing their own grout.

jamie
18 days ago
Reply to  Kate

I lived in a 50’s house with mint green tile everywhere!!! It wasn’t terrible and I grew to love it. Anyway, there was never a problem with the white grout, as long as it’s properly sealed. The shower was a little tougher and need more elbow grease but vinegar and water and a brush did the trick.

jasmine
18 days ago

these colors are gorgeous! I hope it works for the kids.
do people install a light inside the shower stall? I have used a shower like that before, and it felt cramped and dark 🙁 and i was sad about enclosing that claw foot tub in that cozy space, the thought of having to wiggle around to clean around the edges – ugh. i kind of hate those standing tubs for that reason. We had a tiled-to-the-ceiling bathroom when I was a kid, and I didn’t like the acoustics of it. But I am not sure if it was the tiles, or some other thing about that bathroom. sorry to be so negative. The space looks gorgeous and the stone top on the wooden vanity will be a stunner. as always the materials chosen are inspiring.

18 days ago

I recently refinished a small bathroom using an old pine cabinet, with image transfers (I work with them in my business). I will always prefer old, solid pieces of furniture over mass-produced pieces any day. Having something completely unique to a room helps brings a new level of interest to it. It’s worth the time and effort finding pieces that will be functional as well as serving as a focal point.

287159817_10159711979980519_4090192687457656568_n.jpg
Sona
18 days ago
Reply to  Diane

Diane, I love your repurposed cabinet.

18 days ago
Reply to  Sona

Thank you, Sona!

Lindsay
18 days ago

Adore the sink! Love the high tile! Agree with the train rack over the toilet for towel storage, and also to consider strategic hooks for hanging towels when showering that one can reach easily, etc. —I will say that once puberty hits, for sure one of the kids will move into the guest bath. They will want all their stuff in one place, and not want to fight with their sib, nor, heavens!, accidentally walk in on the other one naked (!!!) They do have a very heightened awareness of privacy at that age–so adorably awkward–and if they can get away from each other to primp, they definitely will. Ditto the comments about modern boys using just as much product as girls–That was the first sign our son had a girlfriend–sudden use of conditioner and blow drying every day! Plus consistent deodorant use! So adorable, these teens. But yeah, more storage in both baths, or maybe a pretty vintage vanity in the bedroom if your daughter really gets into makeup.

Sarah
18 days ago

Oh man. Echoing the comments on storage. My daughters have a vanity with two sinks, a few tiny drawers, and two cabinets below the sink. It’s also marble on top with minimal counter space. I already know it is 1000% not going to cut it for teens. Whenever I am ready to do a project, it is going to go. Quartzite countertop (I can’t even imagine natural stone with all future makeup and sprays getting everywhere). Probably a reversion to one sink to make enough counter space. I’d put in a cabinetry storage tower if I can figure out a way. This is definitely asking for Birdie to move into the guest bath by the time she’s 12 at the latest.

I would have made a shower/bath combo on the same wall both are now; put the toilet over there too, and extended (a practical) vanity and maybe a cabinet tower across the wall where the future useless vanity is now. Maybe the ruined dresser setup can be moved to a powder room or guest bath.

Shannon
18 days ago
Reply to  Sarah

Useless vanity? Ruined dresser? Harsh! Quartzite is a natural stone.

Beth
18 days ago

Oops, I totally thought the first batch of pics were the updated bath on my phone. And I kept thinking “but I thought she said green!” Personally I really love the old bathroom,but look forward to seeing your ideas come to life. Renderings never do justice to beautiful materials and space. Good luck!!!

Heather
18 days ago
Reply to  Beth

I must say I think the old bathroom looked pretty perfect. 🙁

Victoria
18 days ago

It’s funny, when I read Emily’s posts about the farmhouse (which I really look forward to!) I wonder why she’s so defensive, why does she say multiple times how awesome it will be and how much she likes it, seems kind of unnecessary or trying too hard. And then I read the comments and oh… that’s why she’s defensive. Guys, they’re two months from move in, nothing is changing, except possibly the medicine cabinet I guess. And Emily has actual experience living in several prior homes so she’s likely pretty familiar as to what human beings need in a bathroom. She also knows her own kids. Also for the record I never had the gazilian products as a tween that commentators seem sure every tween has. Finally, each kid has their own bedroom with a mirror I’m sure and frankly I assume any hair styling they might or might not be into in 5-10 years will be happening there.
What I found most interesting about this post is that despite the gazillion professional eyes on this project someone missed that the framing should have accommodated a bigger medicine cabinet. Isn’t that kind of stuff nuts?! Drives me nuts.

Penny
18 days ago

Interesting discussion. I recently stayed at a holiday property that had definitely been designed to look beautiful in photographs – which it does. The reality of existing in that space – even for just 2 days was painful. My husband was begging to leave after one night. It was just so frustrating and uncomfortable to be there. Function is so important and while I love a stylish room, I honestly believe that function needs to be considered first. Surely that’s an exciting design challenge – to create something that’s both beautiful and functional?

Rachel
18 days ago
Reply to  Penny

So curious to know the things that were impractical, would you mind sharing? Things that you need more as a guest than someone living there or both?

Lia
18 days ago

My favourite part is the bathtub nook with curtains – a sweet little touch that softens the whole space. Love it.

hickenack
18 days ago

Love the design of this room.

Might want to reconsider wall cups for toothbrushes. They are best kept tucked away to minimize e Coli exposure. The best place is in a medicine cab… Oh wait. Bottom drawer of the dresser vanity.

Re: separate handles for hot and cold… I remember as a kid visiting my grandmother having to always turn on the cold first then add hot slowly. So annoying. I’m happy for modern mixer faucets. Separate looks pretty but one lever is more practical and lessens chances off little hands getting burned.

Lane
18 days ago
Reply to  hickenack

Actually, there’s a plumbing code that requires a maximum temperature in bath faucets and showers. It’s unlikely anyone would get burned if they set the water heater to that temperature.

Rae
18 days ago

Lovely mix of materials and colors. I especially like the color of the vanity wood with the green tile and brass hardware – classic and warm. The lack of storage will certainly equal a cluttered bathroom with two kids. Perhaps that isn’t something that bothers you and your kids? Mine hate a messy room (as do I). Why not hang a cabinet over the toilet? Plenty of space for the toothpaste, hair brushes, bandaids etc. Lots more options than the train shelf will provide. Will there be shelves tiled into the shower nook? You could install shelves on either side of the tub in the nook for shampoo, soap, perhaps even small baskets for other items.

Annie
18 days ago

I don’t know; I think the storage concerns here are a tempest in a teapot. My brother and I shared a bathroom smaller than this (shower/tub combined), and storage was literally never an issue, nor did one of us feel tempted to decamp to another bathroom when we got older. That was our bathroom, and it was all fine. My brother (older than I am) told me once when I was about 11 that when he left the bathroom, he left it looking like no one had ever been there (he put his stuff away, he made sure the floor/vanity wasn’t sopping wet), and he expected me to do the same. Done and done.

Angela
17 days ago
Reply to  Annie

That’s so mature of him and such a good lesson to learn!

Kat
18 days ago

Just chiming in to say, I grew up in a smaller bathroom and less storage than this with 2 brothers that we shared. And ya girl is high maintenance. The bathroom storage was kept as cleaning and everyday products (toothbrush, shampoo, basic hygiene). I usually did my hair and makeup in my room where I kept everything on a vanity table. We did that for 20 years til my brothers and I grew up and moved out of the house. I dig the tile and the look and just wish it was my bathroom!!

Gwoman
18 days ago
Reply to  Kat

Like you, I grew up in a house where we all shared one bathroom. However, my mom made sure there was enough space to store the everyday items you used in the bathroom. I posted about it on another comment below. For me, the biggest issue with this bathroom is the lack of planning for storage of the basic everyday items used in a bathroom even if Emily is planning for the kids to do things like hair drying in their rooms. No place for extra towels and wash cloths. No place for extra soap, shampoo, etc. Not enough counter space for toothbrushes/paste, mouth rinse, floss, waterpik (for when the kids get braces), face wash, hand soap, etc. No place for feminine hygiene products. No place for extra toilet rolls. No place to hang wet towels or a robe while showering. No place for cleaning supplies. She spent a lot of time thinking about and planning for storage needs in the kitchen, pantry and mud room, then designing custom cabinets to meet those needs. Yet, here she seemed to be fixated on using that average looking ‘vintage’ dresser for show with little thought for the function of the room.

Kj
18 days ago

I just hope we get to see the rest of the farmhouse before Emily deletes her blog and becomes a life/design coach to the stars for hire only. 😂

Ellie
18 days ago

I’m learning so much about tile from these farmhouse posts. It’s all really beautiful.

I can only think of one house with a double vanity here so it doesn’t stand out as being a big deal to me. Will teenagers actually want to use a bathroom at the same time anyway? I would quite like more storage too but it looks like there is plenty of space to add more over time. Not everything needs to be ready for teens right now… as long as there is space to add and nothing that will have to be undone.

Sherrie
18 days ago

“How much STORAGE do 2 kids need anyway?” JUST WAIT UNTIL THEY ARE TEENAGERS. There will be plastic containers on the floor from Ikea or The Container Store if you don’t plan for more storage…..yikes.

Nicolettte
17 days ago

I am scared for the lack of storage in this bathroom. Especially two kids that will soon be teenagers. A medicine cabinet will help so much! I know you are in the mind set to just move in, but these are not things that will be easy to change in the future after tile is done! Kids stuff is ugly, teenager stuff is even uglier, unless you are putting a closed cabinet above the toilet I really thing you will regret not having more closed storage in here.

Zoe
17 days ago

Gosh. This post has me feeling some sorta way. I think a lot of it is probably rooted in jealousy as the before is so much more beautiful than my current bathroom, or any bathroom I’ve ever had. Some of it is that I like the previous bathroom better than the new bathroom, which is of course irrelevant. I don’t live there so my individual tastes don’t matter. Some of it is that it does feel wasteful and out of character with the version of Emily I’ve constructed in my head. There’s something gross about gutting something that could so easily have been made special with wallpaper and switching out some hardware. (But would I have had the same feeling if I’d LOVED the new design after gutting it? Meeeh, probably not and that really takes away the moral high ground lol.) Mostly, it made me want to see what Emily ten years ago (or with a ten years ago budget) would have done in this space.

Christina
17 days ago

I almost never comment but I’ve been reading this blog for years and I have to say that I’m pretty much done. This “farmhouse” (calling it a farmhouse seems almost a joke at this point as it is basically a mini-mansion for 4 humans) is so extravagant and unnecessarily wasteful. In this particular historical moment, considering climate change and inflation and, just, EVERYTHING – it really seems in poor taste and not really true to the “make it work” Emily Henderson style that originally made me a fan. I cannot even imagine how much this gut renovation of such a large property must be costing (in the millions?) – even a bathroom redo with that much tile must be tens of thousands – when the original bathroom, as many commenters have pointed out, was fine. I would have loved to see her make the old bathroom a little more charming and cute by using what was there. It really just feels out of control and not really fun to witness anymore. I know I can obviously just stop reading at any point and I think I will. It’s just too much.

16 days ago

I think the majority of us (me included) grew up in a bathroom that had little storage and probably wasn’t as big as Emily’s; and yes, we survived and ‘made do’. I think the disconnect with the blog post is Why would you force yourself into a corner with a ‘make do’ situation, when you’re gutting the place to begin with? Obviously, Emily has the designer/contractor/finances etc in place to really design a room where all of the negatives could quite easily be addressed; so I’m not quite sure why she’s decided not to tackle them head on. With her mad skills I’m sure she could have come up with a beautiful design that is more functional. Obviously, the easiest solution (I’m not a designer) would be to do away with the bath and place a bigger vanity/storage unit there. I know for resale, it helps to have a bathtub in the home (but I’m sure there will be one in her bathroom). I’d much rather have a bigger shower than have a bathtub (that takes up so much room, and probably isn’t going to be used on a daily basis). I wonder if it’s because of product placement? Perhaps… Read more »

A.B.
16 days ago

How do the windows fit in with the rest of the house?

Joyce Garrity
15 days ago

Stunning! love the border, black floor will show every piece dirt tho’. I did the same with a dresser, and the drawer sides are usable. I agree on building a medicine cabinet.. possibly surrounded by his and hers built in niche shelves. Or a large niche cupboard above toilet with partial doors? I do agree the shower feels claustrophobic.. a window in it perhaps.. which would also function as a niche? I personally am not a fan of the railroad racks, always look messy, esp. w kids. As for extra storage, isn’t that why god invented baskets? ( esp. for towels?)
ps. they will be likely leaving home for college where they will have no storage, just tell them you are preparing them for life!

Joyce Garrity
15 days ago

… and as a person with a similar era tile/wainscotting bath, glass shelves a perfect later additions. and the towels need to be reachable in shower to prevent “walking puddles”.

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