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The 2022 Bathroom Trends That Renovators Won’t Want To Miss

Hi folks and welcome to our 2022 bathroom trends predictions part II. Last week we dove headfirst into the non-renovation, renter-friendly trends so today we are focusing on all things renovation. As a renter myself, I was frankly surprised at how much these reno-based trends excited and inspired me. If nothing else, these emerging trends remind me that interior design is always shifting according to the world around us and that is a beautiful thing. I don’t think I need to remind you that a lot has happened in the past two years and a lot of the trends you are about to see are a reflection of that. So with everything happening right now, let’s escape with these 8 bathroom trends, shall we? Here we go.

Asymmetrical Sink Placement

design by hunt architecture | photo by leonid furmansky | via dwell

Functionally speaking, an off-centered sink allows for more counter space so you can display your daily skincare products and simply have more space to get ready. As someone who has a single pedestal sink with no counter, I can say that having that extra space would be a dream (you have no idea how often my products fall to the floor while I am getting ready). You can also use that space to style a tray or opt for a decorative object like a stand-alone lamp (which happens to be one of our renter-friendly trends).

design by olga ashby | photo by vigo jansons

When it comes to renovating, one of the things we try to emphasize is designing for you or your family’s needs. If you think about who will be using which rooms and for what purpose, it will help you make the best design decisions. For example, this sink placement is really great for guest bathrooms or single-person bathrooms but may not be the best if it’s a shared bathroom where two sinks would be more applicable.

As far as aesthetics go, the asymmetrical sink placement looks interesting and fresh. In these smaller bathrooms, it helps allow for more counter space on one side (so important in a small bathroom) and it creates visual interest. For example, the mirrors are placed directly above the sink, creating an off-centered look. To counterbalance this, a sconce can be used to take up that extra wall space, creating a “rule of thirds” like composition.

The 2022 Version Terrazzo Tile

design by run for the hills | photo by philip durrant | via clever

I was hesitant about this one at first, but the more I saw it show up on my feed, the more I realized it is just the tile trend we need in 2022. It’s undeniably playful, versatile, and sustainable which makes its resurgence in the design world a welcomed treat. When we are all craving color and pattern, terrazzo tile is the vessel that can work with modern, minimal styles while still adding that extra special detail.

design by lorla studio | photo by vivian johnson | via clever

What I love about this trend, and the above bathroom in particular, is how the terrazzo adds a playful element but the overall design can remain calm and relaxing. Designer Laura of Lorla Studio was inspired by minimalist Scandinavian aesthetic so she wanted to keep the bathroom neutral and calm. The soft color palette and minimal fixtures help execute this vision.

design by girodroux et delpy | photo by stephen julliard | via elle decoration uk

This mid-century luxe bathroom aesthetic pairs perfectly with the exciting terrazzo tile. The brass finishes and dark navy cabinets complement the speckled terrazzo, creating a perfect fusion of playful and sophisticated.

I actually talked about this bathroom in the previous bathroom trend post, but I think it’s worth noting that the terrazzo tile brings it to a whole other level. I mentioned this bathroom nails the monochrome look and a part of that is due to the multicolor tile. The key to making monochrome work is applying different tones of the same color. This helps break up the color so it’s not too visually heavy and the tile helps achieve this.

design by alexander & co | photo by anson smart |styled by claire driscoll delmar | via est living

To wrap up the terrazzo trend, we have this gorgeous bathroom that marries organic stone materials with a sliver of multicolor terrazzo. I love that the terrazzo backsplash breaks up the earth tones to create a playful effect.

Built-In Vanities You Can Sit And Get Ready At

design by studio johnston | photo by anson smart | via yellowtrace

I tend to sit criss-cross applesauce in front of a floor mirror when I do my makeup because I find sitting is the most conducive to get getting my face ready for the day. It’s either that or I just really love sitting. In any case, I 100% understand why bathroom vanities are emerging in bathroom designs at the moment. I think the past two years of the pandemic has helped a lot of us slow down and that includes our morning or evening routines. If space allows, including a built-in vanity is functional and luxurious.

design by jane hallworth | styled by michael reynolds | photos by sam frost | via architectural digest

I’ll never forget this home tour. It blew everyone at EHD away for good reason. Among many other frankly shocking (but SO good) design decisions, this bathroom took up a lot of our headspace and gave us all heart eyes. The vanity here is not traditional but SO good. I love that they built it off the side of the wall instead of digging into the wall to create a nook. It’s an unexpected choice among many other unexpected choices that make this home tour so unique.

photo by sarah sherman samuel | photo by nicole franzen

It’s hard for me to not talk exclusively about THAT CHAIR but I’ll use my best restraint. Sarah Sherman Samuel shared that she wanted this guest bathroom to feel like a boutique hotel this built-in vanity really drives that vision home. Oh, and we love that oversized bulb sconce something fierce.

The More Affordable Way To Use Marble

design by jane hallworth | styled by michael reynolds | photos by sam frost | via architectural digest

We are used to seeing large slabs of marble used for bathroom floors but what no one tells you is how much more expensive that can be. Finding the right single slab for a space is costly and the more expensive the stone, the more expensive the installation cost is. So the large format marble tiles are a little more affordable and they slightly break up the flow of the veins which can be a more exciting choice, especially in a large suite-like bathroom like the one above.

design by studio hus

This bathroom by Studio Hus was designed 5 years ago, proving that this has been a slow-burning trend that is still going strong. I love that the flow of the marble is broken up so there are subtle nuances in every square.

design by kelly wearstler

It should come as no surprise that this bathroom is designed by Kelly Wearstler, who I personally refer to as the queen of dramatic marble. Her choice to apply large-scale marble tiles from floor to ceiling makes this bathroom suite feel like a luxury spa.

Oddly Placed Sconces

design by frederick tang architecture | photo by gieves anderson | via clever

We can’t talk about bathroom trends without mentioning lighting and y’all, this lighting trend is showing up everywhere I look. I am fascinated and delighted by the unexpected lighting placement designers are having fun with and cannot wait to see more of it this year.

I love the stacking of these mix-matched sconces because it fills that extra wall space and creates a sculptural moment. This could have been done with art but the sconces make it more functional and unexpected.

design by frederick tang architecture | photo by gieves anderson | via clever

In the same bathroom, the two asymmetrical sconces above the tub serve the same purpose by being sculptural and functional. This bathroom is from a gut restoration of a 2,700-square-foot Brooklyn brownstone—originally built in 1899. The designers were focused on historic preservation and modernization, so while this bathroom feels more modern I think some of the charm stems from their focus on honoring the architecture.

design by framework studio | photo by kasia gatkowska

This double pendant-sconce magic in this bathroom by Framework Studio is wonderful. Another micro-trend we’ve been seeing is sconces on mirrors so it’s especially fun to see both play out here.

There is so much to love about this moody powder room by Homme Boys (like the Roman Clayed walls or that petrified wood sink) but the stacked bulb sconces are hard to beat. The sconces are from Hudson Valley Lighting, a retailer that is always ahead of the curve when it comes to lighting.

design by pappa smiron | photo by brittany ambridge

Okay, I rest my case. I can’t take my eyes off those three staggered sconces. It feels so artistic because the placement is perfectly odd and again, the asymmetry creates a special sculptural element. Can we/should we also talk about the chandelier and bulb light combination here??? I am stunned and positively delighted by the choice.

Exposed Shower Pipes

design by moore house design | photo by erin mcginn and zack dezon

When Emily mentioned the exposed shower pipe trend in one of our meetings I started to see it everywhere and in the most surprising bathrooms. The above bathroom for example is incredibly minimal so the matte black pipes really stand out. With high-end spaces, the choice to opt for exposed pipes is really intriguing which is all the more reason to do it. It should also be noted that an exposed pipe is a lot cheaper than having to dig into the walls to install.

design and photo by carlay page
design by insidearch project

In this modern luxe bathroom, the shower pipes match all the brass elements so it feels less shocking and more cohesive. This brings so much more personality to the space while remaining modern and fresh.

design by sarah solis | photo by shade degges photography

I’ll wrap up this trend with the above shower that blew me away. The modern staggered tiles paired with the vintage-inspired shower piping is a great way to combine styles and eras. It gives an industrial vintage look that feels very high-end and intentional.

Curved Backsplashes

design by beata heuman

We don’t see a ton of traditional backsplashes nowadays but when we do they are often curved, scalloped, or arched. This scalloped number by Beata Hueman is undeniably fun which is a common theme among her designs. We love the scallop trend and predict it’ll stick around because we all are craving fun elements in our homes right now.

design by julie rose for velinda hellen design | styled by emily bowser | photo by sara ligorria-tramp | from: julie’s first lead design with vhd – a primary bath reveal + tips on how to easily blend classic & contemporary styles

We love Julie’s application of the curved backslash in this modern traditional bathroom makeover. Julie said this about the choice: “The other vanity dilemma was how to make the wider, middle section feel purposeful since it overlapped with the two flanking windows. The solution was to create a beautiful two-tiered, curved backsplash moment using the Sereno Bianco from Vadara. This quartz stone is not only very user-friendly, it also has the most beautiful veining pattern in person making it one of our go-to quartz for our clients.” We’re obsessed.

design by beata heuman

Here’s another backsplash by our gal Beata Heuman. We love how the curve of this backsplash flows over the window, bringing in an added layer of movement. The stone slab also breaks up the colorful decor elements, which adds a level of sophistication to this otherwise playful bathroom.

Corner Sinks

image via hotel villa maroc

If you are renovating a small bathroom and are wondering where the sink will go, this trend is tailor-made for you. Corner sinks are not only space-saving, they add a certain vintage charm. It’s definitely ideal for a powder bathroom that doesn’t require a ton of storage, and man is it pretty.

design by beata heuman

Beata Heuman flips the script by opting for this corner sink placement in a bathroom suite that (spoiler alert) has a whole other sink on the opposite side! I am never not in awe of her designs but this one left me speechless. So if you need permission to install a corner sink in a larger bathroom, this is undoubtedly it.

design by sarah sherman samuel | photo by nicole franzen

I leave you with this custom floating vanity by Sarah Sherman Samuel. It really is the perfect fit for this corner space and brings in a modern flair to this otherwise retro-inspired bathroom.

Okay my friends, this concludes our 2022 bathroom trends. I hope you enjoyed and let us know which trend (or trends) you love most down below. xx

Opener Image Credit: Design by Alexander & Co | Photo by Anson Smart | Styled by Claire Driscoll Delmar | Via Est Living

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Erin Dae
3 months ago

I’m in the midst of planning my en suite bathroom renovation (20 years in the making), so this is such a timely post to make me think creatively!

Lynn B
3 months ago

I always ooh and ahh whenever I see terrazzo, it’s just so fun and happy. I wanted it for our basement bar when we were renovating a few years ago, but I had a hard time sourcing it. The few places I could find it were expensive and the wait times were very long (and this was pre-COVID). I would love to see an EHD post all about terrazzo!

Leah
3 months ago
Reply to  Lynn B
Susan
3 months ago

Terrazzo and curved back splashes and anything Beatta Heuman does are my favs

Kelly
3 months ago

Love the curved backsplashes and the corner sinks. Since I’m the one who cleans my bathroom, the exposed pipes look like a lot of extra work for me :).

Rachael
3 months ago

Thinking of replacing the double sink vanity for a single offset one for more counter space and less business/sink to clean BUT will I miss having two? We aren’t in the house yet and we’ve never had two sinks before. Do couples really use both sinks at the same time often enough for this to be an issue?

Suzanne
3 months ago
Reply to  Rachael

Double sinks are a preference. They aren’t necessary. We have them and love them. My husband thinks they are essential. But I also don’t like too much counter space, because I don’t want the temptation to leave things out. If everything is in a basket, it’s easy to take out the “get ready” basket, and put it back. The hardest part is all the things that need charging, so look at putting in a drawer with outlets for chargers and hairdryers and such. I did my bathroom 13 years ago and didn’t anticipate that need.

Karen
3 months ago
Reply to  Suzanne

We have double sinks in our primary bathroom and LOVE them- would not want to share. I love having my own side. I am uber neat and DH- not so much- so it works very well for us! In my boys’ bathroom, we did an offset sink to give them more counter space and that too works very well. It’s much more useful than a center set sink with limited counter space on each side. YMMV.

Lori
3 months ago
Reply to  Rachael

I’m team 1 sink! If you never had two sinks you probably won’t miss it. We remodeled our bathroom 2 years ago and included one sink after having the same conversation. Are you really going to need to brush your teeth while your partner washes their hands? You are also losing countertop space and storage below because of the plumbing. Also, the cost of the faucet and sink would double. Lastly, I would rather look at my beautiful quartz countertop!

Alexandra
3 months ago
Reply to  Rachael

We never use our sinks at the same time. However … my partner’s sink always has a bit of dried shave cream and facial hair trimmings in the mix. I like doing my fancy pants skincare at night in my pristine sink basin on the right. He can have his beard scraps to the left. And then the whole outfit gets a very good scrub on Saturday mornings. I say give it a try before you decide either way — your mileage may vary! You could love your private sink island, or decide a second sink is a waste of good countertop vanity space.

Jenn
3 months ago
Reply to  Rachael

I think one sink is better as well, but i have to say, when we sold our house last year, even though the main bath was completely remodeled and BEAUTIFUL, one of biggest complaints from buyers was only one sink. so even though in our current house, i would have preferred one sink and more counterspace, we went w/ the future attractiveness to buyers (not a good strategy i know, but i have owned 8 houses in 10 years, so chances are this will not be the last), and put in double sinks with our remodel.

SS
3 months ago
Reply to  Rachael

Once my husband switched to shaving in the shower I stopped wanting a second sink. We haven’t totally decided yet but I’m leaning toward just one. I’m putting two wall mounted faucets on a single trough sink in the hall bath, though. We have a lot of hands to wash around here.

bobbi
3 months ago
Reply to  Rachael

When we remodeled our bathroom we went from two sinks to one. I thought we would love double sinks but even when we had two we both used the same one, even when we brushed our teeth at the same time. Totally a personal preference, but I love the additional counter space (which has a bar of soap and a plant, totally instagram worthy) and additional storage, over double sinks.

Sheila
3 months ago

If I could afford to renovate my bathroom, I’d be all over terrazzo. Much more appropriate to my MCM house than the granite installed by the previous owner. From the original plans, I can see that there was a single sink with a sit-down vanity, now replaced with double sinks. I’d love to restore that vanity and using sconces as art in a bathroom is a great idea!

kiki
3 months ago

Really surprised that you didn’t have a category for the “textured” walls! SO MANY examples in the swipes you pulled of that ‘limewash’ / ‘roman clay’ / ‘imperfect plaster’ types of finishes. This is such a huge trend, maybe it’s on the docket for an upcoming round up?? or maybe i missed it and you did already share it 🙂

Suzanne
3 months ago
Reply to  kiki

I wonder if the wall treatments are an overall trend as opposed to a bathroom trend. I feel like they did talk about it in posts last year.

Suzanne
3 months ago

I love everything by Beata Heuman. I keep trying to find the right application for a curved backsplash. Oh Joy’s bathroom, in the monochromatic pinks with terrazzo floors, is my inspiration for redoing a mid century beach apartment bathroom, but that’s a luxury I’ll have to wait on. And I have an off center sink in that bathroom, so I’m already on trend. In my primary bathroom suite, I have two larger pedestal sinks by choice. I actually like minimal counter space in the bathroom, because I don’t want an excuse to leave a bunch of stuff out. The only small regret to the pedestal sinks is the lack of storage.

Bea
3 months ago
Reply to  Suzanne

I totally agree! I love Beate’s style and have just bought her book. So much eye candy in there.

Also recently discovered Soho House bathrooms and love the ones in Berlin.

Josh
3 months ago

These are great! I especially love the marble and offset sinks, but I have seen so many design trends for 2022 mentioned in multiple sources. Instead of trends, what has staying power? What is timeless? I would rather see timeless design versus something that will be dated in a few years. Some elements never go out: polished nickel, marble, etc. What else is there?

Jennifer
3 months ago
Reply to  Josh

I agree! Currently renovating our primary bathroom and I cannot decide on which metals to use. Is gold a passing trend?? It’s SO pretty in bathrooms! And, say what you will about subway tiles, but they have earned their spot on the classics list. There are so many fun variations now.

Aquagirl809
3 months ago
Reply to  Jennifer

Brass fixtures are timeless and have been used for centuries.

3 months ago
Reply to  Josh

I also love the trend posts, but would love posts about timeless elements! What never goes out of style?

Elaine
3 months ago
Reply to  Josh

Couldn’t agree more! I just love these posts and Ryann has come through with some more stunning imagery this week. But while I love terrazzo and marble, the title image (the one with the fabric skirted under-sink) just confirms in my mind how much I hate this skirted trend. I truly hate it and I’m not afraid to say it!! Even if Beata Heuman and Matilda Goad are mad for it, I think it will date very quickly. So, a ‘timeless’ post would be a nice counterbalance to a ‘trend’ post, and even more so in the context of increased construction prices, supply chain issues and the need to consider the longer-term investment that more permanent fixtures and fittings represent.

Suzanne
3 months ago
Reply to  Elaine

Elaine – I actually love the skirted sinks, and keep considering it for my kitchen remodel, but like you, I think it will date. I think that’d be another good post, “Looks you will love but tire of quickly.” This is the hardest thing to imagine. Having lived through various trends in over thirty years of adulthood (hard to believe), I know how my taste has changed. There are some things that have stayed constant, but how would I have predict what those preferences would be?

Sona
3 months ago

I grew up in a MCM split level house built new for our family in 1960. The entire main floor was poured terrazzo, not individual tiles. It was my favorite element in that house. My mother lived there for 52 years before selling it and moving to a retirement community. I would love to incorporate terrazzo in my current home.

Christa
3 months ago

I really feel like these are all very unique and fun to see but not at all practical. Anything fabric or hard to dust/wipe down, or scrub and disinfect is a no for me. Sinks need counter space, and light fixtures need to be functionally bright and correctly placed to use the mirrors. Giant slabs of marble and other stones are fabulous for extremely wealthy people, but not if you need to get ready to go to work every day. I do like an offset sink though.

janice
3 months ago
Reply to  Christa

I agree. Just had a simple renovation–practical, nice and good quality of what was actually affordable, but basic. Out of neccesity, the floor, tub, vanity, toilet, walls, plumbing (older home) all had to be replaced–and what with the contractors, plumbers, etc. the cost was well over 20,000. This was just the one bathroom. And just basic materials and labor. The materials in these examples are beautiful and, while some ideas can be tweeked and adapted, most are entirely out of reach without huge budgets and income.

Bea
3 months ago
Reply to  janice

I’m in exactly the same position! I’ve just committed to approximate the same amount and the vast majority of that is on labour. However, I did go for the more pricy range of fittings (not basic but not mega lux either) since percentage wise they were significantly cheaper than the cost of installing it all. The same applied to the tiles.

janice
3 months ago
Reply to  Bea

It was especially difficult because, even though we were consulted, we live in a rental. Did go for marble and double sink footed vanity with mid-range fixtures, but floors are still lino. Non-slip and pricier lino than most, but still. Safer for landperson since they really never know who is going to rent next, even in higher end areas. Total makeover took 9 months, what with shortages and the pandemic. How to follow the trends in a rental? I loved the post on non-reno BR ideas! Maybe more of these posts for all areas of the home (I know there are some, but I’d like to see more). I’d love to see more ideas on how to incorporate trends in a rental, but are practical for both the owners and the renters (no stick on tiles, no painting, no large holes for anything). And for all generaltions (safety?…I’m a boomer and slick floors are just not practical in our case). They may be on the site but I’m new to it.

Bea
3 months ago

I signed off on plans for my tiny bathroom (2m x 1.5m) yesterday and find this post so much fun.

Not because I plan on going crazy with marble and heavily veined tiles (I’ve chosen narrow white subway tiles – to be laid in a horizontal stacked formation – and “chalk limestone” ceramic floor tiles) but because I’m going to try and incorporate some of these trends in my accessories.

Perhaps a terrazzo style toothbrush holder and soap dish will be fun. I want a curvaceous vintage mirror (above my floating, pipes exposed and no storage sink) in the spirit of Beata Heuman’s mantra of “always incorporate curves” and perhaps a vintage style carpet / rug on the floor as a bath mat.

The expensive , installed stuff that will take another 15-20 years before it is replaced I want to be timeless (hence white tiles). For the easily replaced stuff I’m very happy to follow trends.

As for storage, I will have a large alcove above the floating toilet with lots of shelves where I plan on having interesting / vintage boxes to store stuff.

Bea
3 months ago

Some people have been commenting that perhaps the exposed pipework is a lot of extra work to clean, I have had to wash down loads of these kinds of showers in my life and they really aren’t a lot of extra work at all!

They are almost ubiquitous in the UK (and other parts of Europe I’ve visited) as the pipes are difficult to hide inside brick / stone walls. In fact, they are invariably cleaned every time someone has a shower thanks to the natural effect of water spilling on them and once a week they get a sprits down with some anti-limescale bathroom cleaner (along with the glass shower door).

As for pipework exposed under the sink – I agree that can be a bit of a pain to wipe down as it means bending over and hanging upside down but it’s really a simple 5 second wipe over to get rid of dust more than anything else.

Heidi
3 months ago

I’d love to see a post on great standard 5’x8′ bathrooms so many of us have, IN ADDITION to this one. I love seeing these posts, too. 🙂

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