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Design

Our New Driveway – A Gravel/Concrete/Asphalt/Regrind Debate

Ready to nerd out over driveways?? Believe me, I didn’t want to either six months ago, but I learned SO MUCH and y’all are asking. I obviously want to remind you all that I am NOT a driveway expert and this is just based on my first-time experience doing it with the advice from the contractors that we consulted in Portland (i.e. there might be other options or very different pricing elsewhere). This is not a story that I ever wanted to tell because I never wanted to redo the driveway in the first place, but now that it’s behind us I feel very grateful that we were able to do it as it’s just so much better. We have the world’s longest driveway so this wasn’t a fun affordable “weekend project”. No, No, NO. You’ll see…

our first trip with the kids

When we first visited the property, IN 2019, we LOVED the long driveway, using words like “magical” and “enchanted”. It instantly transported you into the country (we live in the suburbs) and you rocked back and forth a bit on the broken pieces while in your car. It’s lined with trees that bend over and meet in the middle but most importantly it had this grass patch in the middle giving it an old two-track vibe. Branches would slap your windshield on the way down the road and you had to pay attention to where the road was to not accidentally get stuck in a ditch. These were all things I loved about it and reminded me of where I grew up (rural Oregon), but quite literally no one agreed with us (besides Cali, our landscape designer who got our vibe). Brian wanted it wider but loved the vibe.

photo by suraya barbee

Sure, maybe the concrete around the rest of the house was “very, totally, irreparably broken,” but it didn’t really bother me. They had patched some of the super broken areas with gravel and when it was dry most people wouldn’t notice (edit: literally every man with a wide truck would comment on it, but none of my girlfriends even noticed and I didn’t give a crap). I have so many other fish to fry, knowing that this home renovation/restoration was going to bleed us dry already. We agreed early on that we’d focus our budget on the house, namely the rooms that were to be heavily documented on the blog for my job, with projects that were tied to partnerships. There are some parts of the construction we can write off, and can actually build future business. I’m not a “driveway influencer” so when we were prioritizing construction costs we really, really didn’t want to have to redo the driveway. It was fine!!! (ish)

Aesthetically I didn’t want to touch it at all because I loved the two-track country vibe. But over the course of the construction with so many big trucks and machinery coming in and out daily + two years of heavy rain, it became more and more busted to the point of not being able to drive down it at all without fearing that you’ll pop your tire. The charm was pretty ruined and not just because it was cracked and in back shape, but because it was so narrow and surrounded by mud. No one could really turn around and every time anyone tried they would get stuck in the mud. It was starting to become very clear that we would have to redo the driveway and she is LONG. So let’s talk through the exact challenges/situation:

  1. It’s a long driveway to just get to the property, then a roundabout with a grove of fruit trees in the middle, and a massive utility space that could park like 10 cars. She BIG.
  2. It seems to be a mix of mostly broken concrete with some poured asphalt mixed in and lots of patches of gravel.
  3. Everything needed to be widened so 2023 cars could navigate without getting stuck in the mud. It was that narrow. I liked the narrowness and found it charming, but explaining that to guys that are stuck in the mud was feeling increasingly silly/annoying.
  4. And then there was MUD. Just so much mud that I think permanently scarred us. We HAD to fix this problem and before next winter.

What Are The Driveway Options

We didn’t really have a dedicated contractor on this part of the job – ARCIFORM would weigh in as would our landscape contractor who had done many driveways, but it was on Brian and I do to all the research and to book the work. So again, this might not all be accurate for your situation but it’s what we were told, based on our research.

Concrete

Everyone seems to love concrete and I agree that new concrete looks better than new asphalt. I don’t know THAT much about this except that concrete seems to be very expensive – and shot up in the last couple of years. Based on our square footage needed it would be $75-100k. It requires a complete demo, grading, gravel base, steel rods, pouring, curing, pouring, curing, and no traffic for weeks afterward. It is what everyone thought we should do with this older home. But y’all, not to take down the concrete world right now, but all the concrete pours I see are always super cracked. Can it really hold up to the rain and heavy cars? Between the price, the length of time (3 weeks), and our doubt that it would really last long term this was a very easy NO. We thought about just doing it around the house, but then we are booking two different contractors and where would it start/stop, etc. It would be clunky and disjointed.

Chip Seal

Many of you reached out to mention chip seal and I had never heard of it. Thank you! So we finally got a chip seal contractor to come quote (which held up the whole process for weeks since he was really busy and there are only a couple of guys in town but we seriously thought it would be worth it). He gave it a solid “no way” because our driveway was on a hill. He said with the rain in the PNW that he would be back in 3 years to redo it. And that’s literally coming from a chip seal contractor. It’s basically glued gravel over a base coat of gravel (I’m sure there is more to it than that, but that’s how he explained it to me). We loved the look of it online but we didn’t experience it anywhere in person but that was a moot point – when the salesperson is saying “no way, this is a bad product for you,” you don’t keep exploring or push back.

Permeable Pavers

At the last minute, ARCIFORM suggested these pavers which honestly I think is a GREAT idea. We did preliminary research which showed that it was going to be very, very expensive but could be very pretty if thoughtfully designed. Think small stone or brick pavers that have space for grass growing in between – creating a pattern. When we brought it up to our landscape contractor he talked us through the process and y’all it sounded even more expensive than all the other options. I will say that it is a great option for the planet as it allows plants/grass to grow through and rainwater to drain directly through it, but we simply couldn’t afford it (and didn’t have time to research partnership opportunities). Now if we ever have a small driveway (literally where you can only park two cars) I would love to explore this, but for our scale of driveway, it just didn’t feel like a viable option that we could afford.

Gravel

We love gravel, y’all. We love the sound of the tires when they drive over, the crunch under our feet as we walk, and the look that feels so casual for this old property. I’m not saying it’s right for everywhere (it’s not), but the vibe was what we wanted. But we had added gravel in the winter of 2022 in a bunch of places in order for trucks to navigate the property without getting stuck in the mud and it all just turned into a mud pit – all of it (granted we didn’t have it properly prepped or done). Also for gravel, we were going to have to demo out all the concrete, grade everything, line and prep and then put a gravel base, compact it, and then add a final top coat. All fine and good but it would take weeks, cost $60K+, and then we were still very, very, very worried that it would wash away in a few winters anyway!! We also just worried that it would collect mud and again, we had felt held hostage by mud for a year. We weren’t going to redo our driveway and have that be a risk. Our asphalt contractor said it for sure would wash away (but obviously he is selling a different product). Which brings me to…

Asphalt

Y’all. This was where Brian and I felt like we were going nuts because everyone seemed so bummed when we said we were highly considering asphalt. There was a “please don’t do this to this beautiful property” look and while I kinda agreed, we were like, “so are YOU going bankroll our concrete cost?” We got three quotes, all around $38k which after concrete and gravel seemed like our best option. We really liked one of the companies – their knowledge, customer service, and response time were excellent, so we set it up. Some of the pros of asphalt are that since it’s liquid tar mixed with rock (I think) it can be poured over cracked concrete and even old gravel – so less demo and prep time (and time is money). There is some prep work, but far less. It also meant that the kids could rollerblade on the driveway and bike easier than they could in gravel – which at the time seemed like a great perk. But it’s black and definitely says, “new construction”. I guess it stinks for a while and can bring black marks on shoes into the house. But it takes only a few days, cost literally 1/2 of concrete (if not even less) and the guy, John, said they could do it literally any time – like the next week.

We were so unbelievably over the mud surrounding our house, at times during the rain feeling like we had to quarantine inside because it would be that bad just walking to the car. I wore Bogs almost exclusively and had to provide rain/mud boots for guests should they want to visit. I ruined countless pairs of shoes – all fine and good, but it informs our decision making which is why I’m bringing it up. So we probably weren’t in the headspace to make this decision because we were reacting to the mud and couldn’t be objective. But we talked about it for months, really trying to see it from a $30k foot view, and asked ourselves if this is what we’d want in 10 years for this property. Were we just doing the cheapest option that we would regret??

After so much debate we decided that asphalt was good enough for us. The house is so pretty that you won’t really even notice. You’ll see the pretty windows, the plants, the pretty architecture – only certain old-house purists would think we took the cheap way out. And we started seeing asphalt everywhere and it looked fine to us!! We know that it always grays out over time, is easy/cheap/fast to redo in 15 years (just one layer and one day’s work, no demo) and ultimately it’s just not where we could spend the money. It was a decision based strictly on time and money and we were quickly running out of both, honestly.

Regrind (A.K.A. Recycled Asphalt)

So our asphalt company was prepping, about to start when we lamented that we really wanted the look/feel/sound of gravel. He suggested quickly, “What about recycled concrete” – a product he also did. I was busy in meetings so Brian tried to relay the information as best he could which was essentially this: regrind is recycled asphalt that is broken up into gravel bits but since it still has the tar in it so it can compact to be harder and with less movement than gravel. He said that the prep would be more (an additional $10k) because they would have to demo out more of the larger broken concrete chunks but the product (regrind) is cheaper than asphalt by around $8k. They still compact it so it’s much harder than gravel, but it’s a bit loose on top and not this new asphalt look/feel. It’s a $2k difference, but when you are talking about $38k-$40k then you really just decide what you think you’ll want more long term, not trying to save $2k.

What Did We Decide????

We made the decision – REGRIND IT IS, with a huge thanks to a few of you who DM’d me and gave me confidence that it was the right thing to do. They began demo’ing out some of the concrete and widening the driveway with prep work when they…

The Hiccup – Too Much Rainwater, Bad Drainage

It had rained heavily the weekend before, which I think was in between the prep work. As they were prepping the long driveway and widening it, the water from our hillside property was flooding the gravel and it was impossible to move the trucks around or to compact it. Cool. So I pulled up my “bad news script” and asked, “ok, what are our options and how much will they cost?”

Option #1: Wait til it dries out, extending the construction by a couple of weeks (depending on weather). But they all advised that without proper drainage it wouldn’t matter WHAT surface we had decided on – this driveway was going to get flooded and would be compromised again within a few years. This is because we had deeply disturbed the hillside by grading it for construction trucks and “disturbed soil” doesn’t retain/drain water like “established soil”. This was proving to be true everywhere there was disturbed soil. He also said that this is why the driveway seemed so patched in the first place – that there was attempt after attempt to fix this problem for decades, but without proper drainage, we would be in that same boat (haha) in a few years. Essentially if we don’t deal with this now we might be drowning in mud again soon.

Option #2: Put in a long perforated tube that would essentially line the entire length of the driveway on the hillside side and act as a French drain, taking the water away before it hits the driveway. This would extend the job by two days and cost $13k. This was obviously the recommendation, but it wasn’t $13 dollars, $130 dollars, or $1300. It was $13k gone just like that. Did we technically have it? Yes, in our savings from the sale of our LA house, which we are grateful for. But oof.

I begged him to get it under $10k and if so I’d just do it, rip the bandaid off in hopes of never having to deal with it again. He agreed and they finished it. They walked the property with us and showed us how much water there was. It’s just insidious and unless we dealt with it now we’d have a bigger problem later.

We had ZERO experience with this and didn’t have time to take a driving cruise around Portland and try to find some regrind. I put it on social and had enough of you say that you thought it was a good idea. So with the information we had at the time we went for regrind.

Our First Reaction

When I came home after it was done I have to admit I was like, “ok. sure?” Since it’s looser it isn’t this super clean concrete or asphalt smooth look. There are areas that are super compact and solid and other areas that we wondered if it was too loose. But as we’ve settled in (it’s been about two months) Brian and I both agree that we actually LOVE it. It is that perfect combination between gravel and asphalt. It feels casual and farm-like, but truly seems to be more compacted and has more longevity than gravel with the hillside + rain combination. I obviously can’t say anything about that for years, so please know this isn’t a review (yet).

So What Does Regrind Look/Feel/Sound Like?

It’s super dark, but not black like asphalt. It looks like dark small gravel rocks glued/compacted together with a layer of semi-loose to loose gravel on top (but very angular, so not that loose and settles in easily to the lower layer). It is about 6″ in total depth (it seems like it anyway). I walk on it in my bare feet but I have working troll feet that can handle much more than others – so I suppose that most people would say it’s like walking on gravel and not advisable with bare feet. But when I’m walking the dogs or driving up the driveway has that grave crunch that I love!

I just checked in with Brian about it – because two months ago we were both like “well, we hope we made the right decision”. And now, he said the same thing – that he has come to love it, too. We are so happy. The whole thing ended up being in the low $40k range (paid over time in payments which always helps) and it’s behind us. But again, I want to stress that the product itself isn’t that expensive, we just have an exceptionally long driveway so if you have a shorter one, all of these quotes would be far less.

If you guys have more insight/experience leave it in the comments. I truly hope that we made the right decision but only time will tell. We love the look and feel like it doesn’t compromise the overall vibe of the house, while hopefully giving us the long-term function, durability, and “NO MUD” that we so desired.

Thank you for listening to my driveway ted talk. I truly hope to not have to ever do this again 😉

*After Install Photos by Kaitlin Green

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Miriam
11 months ago

Sounds like macadam
Very historical and period appropriate!

Melinda
11 months ago

I think it looks great!!! I hadn’t heard of a few of these options before either, and as someone that’s also looking down the barrel of being forced to redo their long hillside driveway soon, VERY MUCH appreciate the dialogue on this. I was wondering, would it be possible to share how many sqft your driveway is? Even a range would be helpful. Also, did y’all noticed any smell or asphalt on shoes since installing?? Thanks!!

🥰 Rusty
11 months ago
Reply to  Melinda

FYI: The brown gravel asphalt doesn’t smell much.

Mandy
11 months ago

This looks perfect. It actually feels more appropriate for the house than concrete or asphalt. Dare I say, natural.

Heather
11 months ago

You had me at bike riding and roller blading. My kids have always played more in our driveway, sidewalk, and street than in our yard. From balance bikes to big kid bikes and skating up and down, I’m grateful we’ve always had a long flat driveway. I never thought about this pre-kids, but it is a total blessing!

Jane
11 months ago

This looks fabulous, Emily and Brian! Love your choice and the saga. I can so relate! We too have a long country driveway with a circular section in Ontario, Canada, and get a lot of snow! We did a recycled asphalt driveway late last summer after SO MUCH RESEARCH! We absolutely LOVE the look. We weren’t thrilled with the tiny stones that we occasionally tracked into the house and onto the porch and patio, but that has decreased dramatically, and the surface itself seems to be getting firmer over time. My husband especially loves that he doesn’t have to spend a day raking gravel off the lawn every spring that gets deposited there by snow removal over the winter 😉

Lu
11 months ago
Reply to  Jane

can you speak to what the snow removal is like with a recycled driveway? can it be plowed? snowblowed?

Jane
11 months ago
Reply to  Lu

We have our driveway blown by a local farmer with a very large tractor. We let him know that our driveway had been resurfaced with recycled asphalt and he came by to look before the first snow of the season. He made sure to keep the blower a few inches above the driveway surface to allow some hard pack snow to form and press down into the driveway. We had LOTS of snow this winter, and the driveway wasn’t damaged at all. If anything it has just become firmer as time has passed.

Alby
11 months ago

I love this look! We are about to redo our driveway and I’m going to check out if this product can handle our harsh Midwest winters and snow. Thanks, Emily!

Lori
11 months ago

Never heard of it, but I love it! Driveway money is not a fun expense period. We are in a similar boat and have gravel. It is very messy on dark colored vehicles and washes away easily. Any idea on the longevity of regrind? We had a friend that did chip seal and it washed away within months. She ended up doing asphalt instead. I like the grayer tone in this.

Alexandre
11 months ago

You absolutely made the right decision!!! It looks great! My parents have had the same type of asphalt for 30 years!

Gretchen
11 months ago

This looks awesome! And I appreciate you sharing all the ins and outs of the decision making. We’re going through a (much smaller) reno now, and NOTHING is simple.

Christina
11 months ago

My brother did the same product on his driveway…. 15 years ago and still in fantastic shape. My brothers driveway is in the PNW, tons of snow/melt, up a mountain, heavy vehicles on it and lots of traffic as he has many drivers in his family, he also owns a boat, and they share the driveway with a neighbor who is a contractor, thus big trucks. You made the right financial decision if concrete or stone is out, and honestly, the look is so charming. Great job!

Christina
11 months ago

I forgot to add that my brother’s driveway is 700 yards long! You will be so happy with this long term.

Jrsinflorida
11 months ago

I feel you on spending money on the driveway. Our fixer-upper had no driveway, the previous owner had driven on the grass for decades to get to the carport. One of the first things my husband wanted to do after we purchased was pour a driveway. I did NOT want to spend that kind of money on concrete. I wanted to redo the kitchen and floors and all the pretty stuff! But eventually we hired a concrete guy who had done work for us in our backyard, pouring a boat ramp and and had done a good job. Well, on the day of the driveway concrete pour, he had a medical emergency (passed out, probably due to dehydration and sun exposure) right after the concrete truck left and we ended up with a huge pile of hardened concrete that dried quickly in the Florida sun. We felt TERRIBLE for him that he had a medical emergency, but what a literal mess the situation was. So we ended up having to pay for concrete TWICE plus someone to demo the the hardened mound of concrete at the end of our driveway. I would have much rather spent that extra money elsewhere.… Read more »

🥰 Rusty
11 months ago
Reply to  Jrsinflorida

I don’t understand why YOU had to pay for tge concrete issue.
A contractor should have appropriate insurance to cover issues like that??🤔

Jrsinflorida
11 months ago
Reply to  🥰 Rusty

There was a whole situation with the contractor that we didn’t realize was going on. He had done good work for us previously, but a few years had passed. After the medical emergency that occurred during the job, we found out he was going through a really bad divorce which led to substance abuse issues and he didn’t have the money to fix the issue. We decided to cut our losses and just pay to get it done correctly. He was out of money, had let his insurance lapse, got arrested for DUI in the middle of all this… it was a mess. Plus we couldn’t get into our driveway with the huge pile of hardened concrete in the middle of it. It was definitely a lesson learned for us, and I’m glad it’s behind us.

🥰 Rusty
11 months ago
Reply to  Jrsinflorida

Yikes!

Shannon
11 months ago

Love it. It has a “dirt road” vibe which is obviously perfect for your country farmhouse. It’s such a win when the less expensive option is also the best, savor it!

KD
11 months ago

Nice! Way to push thru the icky (and expensive!) side of projects. It seems like the perfect solution.

Hazel
11 months ago

Wow- sounds great. Can kids bike & roller skate? Seems like biking would be doable at least.

Julie
11 months ago

Looks like a good solution to a hard problem with the information that you had at hand. It looks really nice with the brick and your farmhouse.

Shsy
11 months ago

More options for anyone looking to do/redo driveways and walkways:

  1. you can seal asphalt in almost any color — it can look very much like concrete
  2. you can stamp asphalt to make it look like brick, slate, concrete or stone

we have a stamped and sealed asphalt driveway & walkway that looks like brick. We’ve had it resealed 1x in 20 years and it still looks great! It is more expensive than just asphalt because it requires more labor and not all asphalt contractors can do it — make sure to get someone experienced and look at previous work in person to make sure it is right for you!

Anne Sweeney
11 months ago
Reply to  Shsy

Never knew you could have asphalt in different colors and stamping as well. I did it w concrete on my patio and walkway.
but on my drive I was never offered a color when we did asphalt! Prob have to find a company that does that and prob few and far between unless it popular in the are one lives in. And it’s not here in central MD. . But now I’m going to check! Thx!

Shannon
11 months ago
Reply to  Shsy

Please share some pics!! Thank you!!

🥰 Rusty
11 months ago
Reply to  Shsy

I’ve seen stamped asphalt l-o-n-g driveways wear off the stamp in two years, so maybe a standard driveway is okay?

Layli Conway
11 months ago

Love this look. Can little kids still easily ride bikes/scooters on this regrind?

Roberta Davis
11 months ago

Interesting! Thank goodness, our driveway isn’t even the length of our car so we won’t have any huge expenses. Even so, it has lots of cracks and gets dirty from dirt washing over it in rainy weather (hills all around). I wonder how long it will be before you have to add more material to it?

janelle
11 months ago

I do like that you focus on all aspects of homeowner ship and technical things, not just paint color and materials. We also need to redo our drive way and this is an amazing resource!

Anne Sweeney
11 months ago

I am glad you didn’t go w concrete. I like asphalt better myself. We did our gravel in that but I didn’t know about regrind! I wish I did bc when you wrote about the crunch that had me! I miss the crunch down the drive to our barn. Also my neighbor had her 1/4 mile drive -that’s adjacent to our lot – done in asphalt and the delivery people now fly down it way too fast. Gone are the days of free ranging my chickens! A little crunch may have slowed them down and on my drive too as we get some traffic to our barn and I’ve put up signs now.
I think the contrast of the product you got against your house will make it look even better. It won’t be fighting w a light driveway. I love to watch your thought processes as you make choices.
I love the driveway and love how you dealt w each hiccup along the way so well – even as the $$ went up!

🥰 Rusty
11 months ago

I was very intrigued and enjoyed your “Driveway TED Talk”🤗
It looks great! I like the crunchy gravel-ish sound and it is ‘farm-y’.
I think I’d have probably gone with brown asphalt. It’s generally used around my southern hemisphere neck of the woods, for lower-traffic (as opposed to, like, real roads and carparks) in heritage areas.
It looks like compacted gravel, wears almost as well as standard asphalt. Instead of aggregate (the grey stones in regular asphalt), it has gravel pebbles.
I learned a whole heap about all types of road building and materials (wrote lessons for schools about it, including man-made filtering wetlands – sooo interesting!), doing a job for the State Main Roads Dept as a consultant! Too funny. Couldn’t have imagined I’d ever do that!
I like the look of your new, practical and not crazy-expensive driveway.
I like that it has recycled aspects and love that you took the experts’ advice on drainage.
Your future-self will thank you.😉

Sheryl
11 months ago
Reply to  🥰 Rusty

Interesting Rusty! I’ve never heard of brown asphalt here (Ontario, Canada). A lot of our dirt/gravel roads in the countryside are compacted and oiled.

Katy
11 months ago

I think this looks absolutely LOVELY—at least, as much as a driveway can look without crossing over into the outrageous! The material might not be the most “period-appropriate” in actuality, but I think in spirit it absolutely fits your home—after all, what farm owner doesn’t hold practicality at the center of their decisions? And it still keeps that same charm you loved originally, especially in the photo with the alley of trees on either side.

Laura
11 months ago

My (also very long driveway) is the same and I love it! It’s very common where I am (rural upstate NY) and it has a nice dirt road/gravel feel but is much more flat and compact than gravel. Casual and rural but it holds up pretty well. Every few years we’ll get some trenches and wash out after a very hard rain, but $5k to fix it and it’s brand new again and lasts for another 5-10 years.

Marilyn
10 months ago
Reply to  Laura

Do you get heavy snow where you live? If so, how does that material hold up to multiple plowIngs yearly?

A
11 months ago

Feels like it just disappears and all you see are the trees and the house—love it!

yousaff
11 months ago

good work enjoyed reading it.

Rachel
11 months ago

I think it’s absolutely gorgeous and so appropriate to the farmhouse vibe. I’ve worked at lots of horse barns that had similar roadways for similar mud-elimination reasons. Congratulations on your lovely crunch!

BW
11 months ago

This post was (surprisingly) interesting and informative – thanks for sharing it!

Robin in NoCo
11 months ago

It looks great and keeps the vibe of the original! We, too, have regrind and love it. No smell at all and relatively easy to top it up if anything sinks or is damaged in the process of snow removal.

Julie S
11 months ago

We moved last year to country acreage and probably have over a mile of gravel drives around the property, some of which we added recently. I’m with you on loving the two track look! Some stretches of ours have that <3 We’re near a limestone quarry in a limestone-rich area, so everyone around here gets their gravel locally and inexpensively. Even so there are some differences in products – the first gravel guy we used chose more of the same inch-wide pieces to top off what sank into mud after spring rains. But the guy who dug an additional length of drive for us finished with a fine mix of sandy grit they call “base” which compacts much harder and doesn’t wear away easily. It’s like a hard dirt road more than gravel – dustier in summer, but less annual upkeep or replacement. I guess we’ll see what we think after this winter!

Jill
11 months ago

Thank you! Now, I’m going to have to find a driveway so I can see what it looks like.

11 months ago

Thank you so much for sharing this! All this info about something normally boring is fascinating–it blows my mind how $$ this basic stuff is, but it also kinda makes sense in terms of people/labor/time/materials. It also looks great, I hope it stands up to the weather and time and stays looking great!

Serine
11 months ago

I think it looks really good but can it be plowed if/when it snows? I live in the northeast and this is a concern.

Kristen
10 months ago

Not totally my place, but have you considered adding a rain garden for that little island of trees? I’m not sure if it’s feasible, but it would help to manage runoff.

Sarah L
10 months ago

I too have learned a lot about driveways and drainage recently and am on-board with your approach- it was super smart to actually address the problem- you found a good contractor. I have a long driveway on a rural forested property and I hate the manufactured look of the asphalt driveways I see around the region, and am so happy to learn about this product! You could also look into building swales and rain gardens into your hillside to slow down the water runoff- it will help retain water in your landscape thereby keeping things greener during your dry summers.

Mary
10 months ago

Oh I feel the pain. In our old house we had about a quarter mile driveway that was gravel when we moved in. Can I say dust? Everywhere all the time. We finally put in asphalt and immediately my house was cleaner and the HOURS of fun my kids had riding down that driveway (I actually had to stop looking because it scared the hell out of me). Our new house I wanted the two track driveway up to the apron of the garage where I wanted it to be pavers but by the time we got to that the $$$ was drying up. So we went with concrete (and two tracks, which we have since filled the center with pavers since many friends “worried” they were driving off the pavement). In addition when we had the landscape contractors for the back patio they ALL exclaimed about the next door parking lot that would drain into our yard–hence thousands into French drains on both sides of the house and way more concrete than I wanted to “funnel” the water to the drains. So after 2 mondo rain years here in Northern California, no flooding in my basement or my backyard/patio.… Read more »

Hazel
10 months ago

Can you (i.e. kids) bike on it? Roller skate? Or are the loose pieces too loose?

Nora
10 months ago

working troll feet <3
Looks great!