Header Flower On Left

Emily Henderson

Style Play Every day
Header Flower On Right
Article Line Long1
by Emily Henderson
Mh Master Bedroom 01

We have officially decided to rent out the mountain house when we aren’t staying there. Brian booked another play so our weekends will be in LA for a while and it actually makes me sad to know that it’s JUST sitting there. And sure, of course, it could help offset the cost of the world’s most over-budget project. Last week, we had a furniture and decor company rent it out as a location to shoot their pieces and well, it was super easy and just a general win-win (plus, really fun to see how they put their pieces in our space).

So, for anyone wondering the who, what and when, here are answers to what I think might be FAQs:

Q: Who can rent it out?

A: Production companies to shoot film, TV, product advertising or editorial. This could be a one-day or 10-day shoot. We are super open to what makes sense. It can be used as a location for whatever scene needed like maybe someone needs to shoot a fancy ski weekend getaway for a film and need to show their characters in a Scandi home like this.

We are also open to vetted groups for vacation as it can sleep three families fairly comfortable. If that’s interesting to you, here are the details: there are two bedrooms with king beds and attached bathrooms, one bedroom with a king AND a queen bed (so great for a family with small kids that want to sleep near parents), and the kids’ room that also has a king bed.  We also have two roll-out twin mattresses. So there are beds for 10 and then you could easily bring a pack’n’play or sleeping bags as the carpet in the kids’ room has memory foam under it. There are a ton of toys and games, an art room in the attic, a (small) climbing wall and it’s just generally very kid-friendly. Plus, the backyard has access to hiking trails and acres of private woods.

Additionally, small companies for retreats or off-sites. The EHD team has done this but of course, this means people sharing king beds which we’re comfortable doing. Maybe a couples therapy retreat?

Q: How much is it?

A: It will vary based on lots of factors. Generally, production companies know the rates (they are in the thousands per day), but it does vary on size of crew, how many rooms they are shooting in and generally how disruptive it is to our lives and the house.

Brian has made it clear, though, that he doesn’t want college parties there because we all know what happens (because we’ve been there). So it will be vetted and with 3,500 square feet and all those luxuries you get (the pebble ice machine alone!), yes it will be a high-end rental.

Q: Are you scared of people trashing it and stealing stuff?

A: Yes… and no.

I’m generally very trusting so I’m the wrong person to ask. But Brian was, and then I had to remind him of this: 1. most people are actually good, 2. Production companies have to have insurance for real damages, 3. Our children will be with us and everything else are just “things,” 4. We designed it to be relatively family-friendly. Sure, the white carpet in our bedroom is getting dirty with traffic to the deck that I didn’t predict, and there is cream wall-to-wall in the guest room that makes me nervous, but otherwise I designed it to withstand a ton of wear and tear. Besides… 5. The little wear-and-tear that often isn’t covered by insurance could be worth the money that we’d get out of the rental of this house.

Q: Why would someone want to rent it out? Why this house?

A: First off, because it’s magical. It’s so quiet, has the best energy, amazing flow and the prettiest light. Secondly, speaking as a producer, it’s very easy to shoot here. Almost nowhere in the house does the sun blaze through and make it impossible to shoot. Even in the master where there are skylights, we can shut them and the windows still light the room beautifully. It’s not chopped up, it has such good flow and really easy access to garage and front door (hey art department, only four steps to walk up in the front and none in the back). The architecture is obviously really pretty, but simple enough to let whatever they bring into it shine.

Q: Can we remove all your furniture, bring in ours and then just put yours back?

A: Yep, that’s the point. As a stylist, I did this for years. We (art department or the styling team) put down layout board on the floor, take pictures of every room, then wrap and carefully remove each piece to store in a big truck or a room that’s not needed for the shoot. Will they accidentally bang the walls with a sofa leg? Probably, which is why it’s expensive. Then we would shoot whatever company’s furniture and accessories and after we wrap, we would have the very fun job of putting everything back. Maybe that’s secretly why I didn’t put a lot of stuff here—less to move and potentially damage (and hey producers, because there’s less “stuff,” loading in and out is fast, which saves on time).

Guys also, hanging out here is fun.

Q: Are you going to put it on one of those rental websites? Airbnb, VRBO, One Fine Stay, Peerspace?

A: Yes, likely. We are currently researching and figuring it out. Back in the day when I did production, there were location agents and really big sites that let you “shop” for locations meant for TV/film online. But I don’t know where those are or who I should talk to so if anyone knows, let me know.

Or maybe you are just a group of ladies who need to get away and have a girls’ weekend, and this house very much feels like a retreat. With three fireplaces, four king beds, a fire pit on the deck, a couple hammocks and a running stream, it’s so peaceful. There is also a surprisingly good spa in town and some decent antiquing. But honestly, it’s the house that you kinda don’t want to ever leave.

The kids’ room now has a king bed that they share with colorful animals on the headboard instead (we are shooting it next week and yes, I typically fall asleep in the middle while reading books).

I’m kind of excited. It’s like a new business venture that I didn’t necessarily think I’d pursue, but after renting it out once, it just seems so crazy to let it just sit there if we can’t be enjoying it. People have always asked if we are ever going to sell this house and our answer is always “no, never (well, unless we leave LA)”, but maybe this is a good way to use it as part of the business, and since I’ve been on the other side so much working in production, I actually really trust and respect how they treat location houses.

If you are interested, email caitlin@emilyhendersondesign.com for any inquiries.

Have you guys ever done this? I know there are horrific stories about weekend renters stealing or doing extensive damage, which keeps a lot of people from doing that but has anyone rented their house out as a location for film/tv or photo shoots?

Do tell … (and also help me with the rates, we are guessing over here).

***photography by Sara Ligorria-Tramp

Psst…if you think you missed one of the mountain house reveals, head HERE to see them all.

 

  1. VERY curious to hear more about putting your own house up for a production company! Would love it if you could share more details in another post about that for anyone that might be interested in doing the same and to hear your experiences doing that (for both parties involved) in the past!

  2. We put our house on Airbnb and it literally fund a trip for our family of 4 (kids ages 3 and 6) to travel around the world for a year, including a road trip from Seattle to Argentina.

    It was the most exciting adventure we’ve ever done and I do it again in a heartbeat. Although we’ve been home for a while, I still put our house online during the summer (tourist season) and it pays our tickets to wherever we want to spend our summer.

    Yes it’s a lot of work (you’ll need a local manager) and yes the house will get banged up, but it’s worth it to us, just for the travel privileges alone. We’ve had a few horror stories (One sweet grandma from California said they were in town for a ‘family reunion’. She neglected to mention that they were hosting their daughter’s wedding, including a giant rental tent in the yard, a caterer, and a poufy white dress, at our house).

    You’re on the right track with specializing: our niche is extended families with grandparents, adult children, and small grandchildren. We have a ton of toys and all the baby gear so families are especially interested in renting it. And, evidently, wedding parties. 🙂

    Best of luck! You have an amazing house and I can see it being hugely popular with small groups and a few families looking for a relaxing weekend. (Also, for Brian’s peace of mind: Definitely disallow parties and be very clear that you have cameras outside that record numbers of visitors – this tends to encourage the party folk to look elsewhere.).

    1. This is my exact life plan! We are working on building up our rental portfolio so that it covers our expenses, then every summer we want to spend it in another country while we rent out our primary house!

    2. Omg I cannot believe they used your house for a wedding!!!!

      That is fabulous how you funded your travel. And so smart about the entrance cameras to deter large groups.

      1. Also specify number of parking spaces (only as many as you are comfortable with/that the house will reasonably accommodate). This will also turn off potential party hosts.

  3. I’m just commenting because I love that leather lumbar on the master bed, and I will not rest until Target makes it available. Come on, Target! Take my money! What is the hold up!?

    1. RIGHT?! I look for it all the time. Even my husband saw the photo of the room and goes ‘I know I said no more throw pillows but you can get that sweet leather one to replace ours for the bedroom’

      1. YES. I’ve been checking the Target app every day. Kind of pathetic, I know, but I must have it. Come on, Target!!

  4. Here is a good rule of thumb for everyone deciding whether to use “who” or “whom”:
    WHO is a subject of a sentence/question, a word that is doing things. (Who will be there? Who is the author?) It does the same job that “he” or “she” does in a declarative sentence. (He will be there! She is the author!)
    WHOM is an object in a sentence, a word that receives actions, a word to which things are done. (“For Whom The Bell Tolls” “The people to whom the invitation was sent” “We are renting the house — but to whom?”) It does the same job that “him” or “them” does in a sentence. “The bell tolls for him” “The invitation was sent to them” “We are renting the house to them”
    When in doubt: remember who=he (ends in a vowel!) and whom=him (ends in an M!) Replace the who/whom in the sentence/question with he/him, and it will be clear which one to use. Is it for an object (“actor”) in the sentence? WHO it is! Is it for a subject (“recipient/target”)? Use WHOM!

    I apologize in advance to everyone who reads this and concludes I am a pedantic jerk. You’re not wrong. But also, words have meanings.

    1. Glad I didn’t have to be the one to say it. 🙂

    2. Oh man. I can’t wait until society determines grammar is a social construct that is just another mechanism for showing off and highlighting privilege and prevents the sharing of ideas of people from all backgrounds regardless of their understanding or awareness of grammar. Am I the only one who is more interested in what people have to say rather than shamming them for sentence structure?

      1. Sentence structure affects what people are saying and the meaning which may be attached to it by readers. It is important. For example, correct language would have identified that you felt people were being shamed, rather than shammed.

        1. Brilliant

      2. But did it hurt to learn something? Of course nobody likes a know it all, however, it’s just 2 cents.

      3. I get your point. But yes, words have meanings. As this is a very public space, and grammar checks are very easily available, it seems reasonable to expect good grammar and spelling here. We have to start somewhere.

        Emily is a content producer; she does it for a living. I would think that grammar is part of good content — a boring part for some, sure, but essential in getting the right message across.

        No “shamming” [sic] here.

        1. HA. I actually thought that we were supposed to use ‘whom’ instead of ‘who’ here but when I didn’t get corrected/edited I decided to NOT google it and NOT ask my mother in law (who is DYING right now because she hates when I use poor grammar) because ‘well, who’s got that kind of time’ and instead just post it. I have my own pet peeves so i GET it, but sadly grammar is not one of them. xx

      4. Disagree. But I was taught by the nuns who pounded this knowledge into my brain. For me, incorrect usage (particularly the misuse of apostrophes and complement/compliment) feels like fingernails on a blackboard.
        In the post about the staff, lots of the employees mentioned a writing background. As the site has become more and more professional, I wish one of them would take on the job of proofreading.
        Love you!

      5. No, you are definitely not the only one who is more interested in what people have to say, than how they say it. You hit the nail on the head with your comment and I agree 100%.
        I would like to add that “Grammar Fan” should consider that we live in the United States – a veritable “melting pot” for sure. Take, for example, my husband of 35 years. He is a smart and accomplished Neurologist who has practiced in a large, well known, hospital for over 40 years. He has many publications and is well respected in his field. However, he came to the USA in his mid twenties from overseas. He is fluent in English of course, but does he always use exactly the correct grammar when speaking ? No he does not. Should we call him out on this ? No, we should not. Correct grammar is important to be sure, but is it more important than who is speaking, or what they have to say ? I will let you all answer that….

        1. No offense, but are you really intimating that this country’s issues w/ grammar are because its a melting pot? You’re effectively blaming immigrants. I’m from a developing nation where English isn’t the first language for the majority of the population and I’m fairly certain the average person I grew up around (I went to an English medium school) has far better grammar and spelling in English, than the average American. The ability to be cavalier with grammar/sentence construction is an innate privilege. As a brown woman, I really can’t get away with being sloppy with how I communicate because there are already so many preconceived notions about me. I tend to go out of my way to check and re-check everything I write at work for this reason, even though I work in a numbers centric profession. Just something to consider.

    3. Finally. Thx!

    4. Thank you, Grammar Fan! This is a super helpful trick that I am very upset I never learned in school.

    5. So now you all feel better for having corrected Emily’s post and shown us all how proud and educated you are. In reality you’ve shown the majority of us that you truly are a jerk and your groupies aren’t far behind. Don’t bother correcting me- as an ESL writer, I am allowed just about anything, dear jerky!

      1. Hi Betty,

        I understand where you’re coming from, but I want to point out that, as a teacher, correcting is a daily part of helping kids (middle-schoolers) learn. It’s certainly possible to correct without showing superiority. I tell my kids that I may make a spelling mistake or two when writing on the board and that they should certainly correct me. They do, I acknowledge and correct, and we move on. Grammar Fan didn’t pounce and shame, in my opinion. She or He just offered a helpful way to remember something that so many of us trip over.

    6. That made me crazy too but I assumed it was just me. I’m a total word nerd. It doesnt take away from the post though… great as always!

    7. As a non-native English speaker who has to write for her job, I appreciate this. You are not a pedantic jerk, your post was a great example of constructive criticism. Betty’s response on the other hand reeks of insecurity that goes on the attack. But I guess, the president of the United States is setting a prime example of that.

      1. I had the exact same reaction! I too found the reminder very helpful because I frequently hesitate over who/whom. I didn’t find it pedantic in the least. Betty’s response though, yikes!

    8. I live in Europe; English is not my mother tongue, but even I knew this. When it comes to grammar rules like these, English is really not that difficult. When writing is part of your job, you can’t disregard grammar. Sorry, but it’s true.

    9. I get that grammar policing can hit a raw nerve with some people, and it often does with me. But when you go to learn a language other than English it’s fantastically helpful to know the difference between the subject and the object of a sentence. I’m Irish and due to a quirk of the Irish educational system, what little grammar I know is in Irish (things may have changed since I was at school, I can only hope). When I went to learn German it was impossible to construct even a simple sentence without knowing the difference between subject and object (because there is a different “the” for each one . Seriously Germans, what were you thinking!)

    10. Grammar matters!

      Classic example: Let’s eat Grandma. (cannibalism) Let’s eat, Grandma. (Saying to grandma that it’s time to eat.)

    11. Yessssss…I read the post title and twitched! LOL

      1. Whom gives a f*ck ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

        Thank you to “another pendantic of jerk”

    12. Agree, I cringed when I saw the post title. I know you want to be a brand; if you want to be considered up there with the big designers you need a copy editor stat. xo

    13. I love that you never know what you’re going to find in these comments. Personally, I find tips like these to be helpful – add it to your arsenal, and use it when necessary. Do I have to have perfect grammar in text messages or in comments on a blog post? No, I don’t really care about that. Would I prefer that I have perfect grammar in something I am sharing that is meant to represent me as a professional? Yes, absolutely. This grammar lesson was presented without any value judgement made on Emily or anyone else who doesn’t know when to use who vs whom; neither was it stated that we couldn’t figure out the meaning that Emily was trying to convey because of this mistake. There are, however, grammar mistakes that DO affect our ability to communicate effectively though, so grammar is not just for showing off. There was something I was reading recently (I think it was instructions for a new game), and I had to read one sentence at least 5 times because it made no sense. Then I realized there was a comma missing, and suddenly I understood. I myself will remember this lesson, so thanks, you pedantic jerk 😀

      1. From another pedantic jerk, could you please go ahead and change the title? Still like nails on a chalkboard over here. The rest of the post is fascinating!

    14. Thank you. I found that grammar tip very helpful for me personally. I perceived your comment as friendly and informative not degrading or shaming. I have to LOL at the comments on here sometimes. Bigger picture people.

    15. Thanks for saying it Grammar Fan. It bothered me too.

      Emily, we feel the same way about our mountain house sitting idle. It just feels wrong. I would be interested in learning how you connect with production companies.

  5. Just some info : Acme House Co. in Palm Springs is an exclusive property management company for luxury rentals. The company was featured on a Netflix show called Stay Here featuring designer, Genevieve Gorder. The show is about turning short term rentals into big moneymakers through design and marketing techniques. (Not that you need help there! Ha!) Anyway, the episode where this company is featured is called The Palm Springs Time Machine. The home is filled with amazing vintage furniture and art. It’s worth the 30-minute watch just to see all the effort, talent, and creativity that went into this house.
    Side note: I also live in Lake Arrowhead and we have several Airbnb’s nearby. Truthfully, we do not like it. More often than not guests are noisy and rude and leave trash on the street – when it snows, they sled down our hill and crash into the side of our house. I’m still surprised every time it happens.
    But I”m sure you and Brian will make a thoughtful decision. No doubt. Just thought I’d share.

    1. Yah. we know its a huge risk. We will have to vet and i’m honestly WAY more interested in doing location rental for production – insurance, nobody sleeps/parties, 3 times the price (at least). So we’ll see ….

  6. Emily: Leslie Saeta of “My 100 year old home” (blog and Instagram) rents her home out to production companies for movies and commercials. I’m sure she could steer you in the right direction!

  7. I have our home listed on Home Studio. It was free.

  8. Yes, 100% agree production companies are the way to go. They are so professional.
    We rented out our NYC apt to the show homeland for a few days.
    Very worthwhile, the only surprises where how well they looked after everything, even things we said don’t worry about, we are talking very careful blanket wrapping of everything, plus the fees they pay. Would do it again in a heart beat.
    Plus they allowed us on the shoot which was fun to watch as a series I was watching.

    1. How did they find you?

      1. The location company approached our co op board and asked if any of the park facing apts where interested, our board sent a memo to all.
        The building has rented out our park view roof top to location company’s in the past, the fees definitely helped the buildings budget for hardly any inconvenience.

  9. A friend if mine owns an architecturally significant mid-mod home and has rented it out for location shoots. She, (or, I suppose, the house), actually has a location agent representing them. They occasionally just get a call asking if a location scout can come and check it out and then the agent handles the deal.

  10. We do this all the time with our house in LA – Molekule, Emtek, simple human, etc. have all rented it and it has gone perfectly. Happy to share the agencies we use. Sara, you know how to find me if you guys want them 😉

    1. Please share!

    2. would love to know how to list my place for shoots. x

  11. The only thing I would even consider stealing is the leather lumbar!! Not really, just so impatiently waiting for it to be in stock ❤️✨!

  12. FYI, you should get some legal advice regarding putting the rental house in an LLC, separate from a family trust or your individual names on the title.

    1. Yessss!
      I agree. There are many financial (tax) implications.

  13. Wouldn’t it be fun to see a feature film set in your beautiful home?

  14. This is 100% not what this post is about, but where can I get those boots in the first pic??

  15. Congrats to Brian!

    Look forward to hearing about how these rental plans develop.

  16. Really looking forward to spotting this house in some yet-to-be-made Netflix Christmas movie!

  17. Curious what happened with the I Design/You Decide vacation stay giveaway, or did I miss the announcement?

  18. I fully expect to see this house in a rom com one of these days, it’s so beautiful!

  19. We bought a second home (condo on the beach in San Diego) and rent it out when we aren’t using it which is the only way we can swing it financially. I agree that a property manager is essential so that you have a line of defense in terms of interfacing with renters and the inevitable problems that will arise during a rental (eg, dishwasher is leaking, etc). Let me also go ahead and introduce you to your new best friend: the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser. Like with your house, our walls are all white and by taking the time to use the Magic Eraser to clean up scuffs and marks on the walls after every rental we have been able to go about 3 years between paint jobs which feels like a victory. Yes, we’ve had minor annoyances and problems arise but honestly nothing terrible and people love our place and the care with which we’ve furnished and decorated (which I find personally satisfying). I also try to have your mindset about things being replaceable. One other tip is to find (either you or via your property manager) a really, really good cleaning service. The #1 issue renters complain about (not with our condo, happily) is the cleanliness of a place (or lack thereof) and having a highly detailed and thorough house cleaner is your best insurance on that front. Plus, they can go in after renters leave and, in the case of damage, take pictures and send to you which can be very helpful if you end up having to pursue a claim through the renter’s insurance company. If people are paying for a high end rental, they will expect it to be immaculate. My two cents…

  20. You can always deem one room as an owners closet for the irreplaceable or personal items you want access to while there. I have found that knowing we rent our house occasionally helps curb collecting habits. Everything precious must fit in the owners closet and everything else is stuff I’m willing to see damaged or missing.

  21. This was timely! I live in Milwaukee and the Democratic National Convention is coming here next summer. We spent a lot of time and $$$ renovating our house and it’s beautiful now!
    I know a couple people renting out their homes for the convention, but I’m wondering the same things: will people take my stuff? do I have to pack up everything and lock it away while they’re here? And if so, is it worth it? Sigh.

    I hope you have luck finding great people for your home!

  22. Did I miss the walk in closet reveal?

  23. Wasn’t my place but a house up the street got used as a location. They repainted the entire front of the house and planted a new garden. The house got returned to the original colour but they got to keep the plants!

  24. Yes, have rented my home to production companies for film shoots. Get a certificate of insurance naming you & the residence address as insured. Have them sign an agreement about how you want payment for missing items / damage to occur (i.e are you waiting for the insurance to pay or is the production company paying, etc.). For the most part, very respectful, a good chunk of money for their time and rarely had issues.

    Also – people on the grammar train. Let it go, enjoy the post, enjoy your life & love the people who fill your time regardless of how they type a word / sentence.

    Peace ✌️ ☮️

  25. True story, I was newly divorced and invited to go on an expensive trip for 2 weeks down the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. I wanted to go very much, but it was not in my budget. I offered it up to the universe and that night came home to a card from the production company for “Touched By an Angel”, a television series that filmed here in Salt Lake City for 9 seasons. Their offer was equivalent to the cost of the trip. Needless to say I said yes.
    They generously invited me to visit the set with my special education students, hosted a BBQ for the neighborhood as another nearby house was used to film that show too, and the celebrities did a drive by in a Cadillac used in the show. A few damages to the property but worth it. It was the best trip!

  26. Nice tips! I have been seeking for things like that for a while currently. Thanks!

  27. Awesome blog! I like it a lot! Thanks and keep up the great work!

  28. “The EHD team has done this but of course, this means people sharing king beds which we’re comfortable doing.” I’m sorry…WHAT??? Your employees share BEDS on team retreats???!!! I can’t even read the rest of the post because I’m so stuck on this revelation!

  29. My house is on giggster and splacer for photo shoots and films. A friend in the industry recommended those to me.

Comments are closed.

Go To Top
[3041]
[3041]
[3041]
[3041]
[3041]
[3041]