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Design

Tour This House Flip In The Hills (By Emily’s Friend of ASOM HOME) That’s Full Of Design “Risks” That Really Paid Off

“I almost didn’t want to sell it,” Annie Segal tells me about this gorgeous house she and her business partner Marieke Ochtman flipped and recently sold here in Los Angeles. It’s located in a beautiful, tree-lined neighborhood on a 1/4 acre plot of land that backs up into Griffith Park. Once you see all of the details in this stunning California casual home they designed with their company ASOM HOME, you’ll understand why it was hard to put on the market and let go.

But first to get your renovation juices flowing, here are some fast facts:

  1. The full gut renovation took 10 months to complete
  2. The home is 2,654 sq. feet
  3. It originally had 3 bedrooms and 2 baths, and after the renovation now has 4 bedrooms and 3.25 baths

Now that you are armed with the stats, it’s time for some before photos to set the scene:

It was a little rough around the edges but Annie and Marieke clearly saw a ton of potential and charm in this 1960s single story 3-bedroom (turned 4 bedroom) home.

If you’ve ever wondered, “where do you even begin when taking on a full gut renovation?” you are in the right place (and frankly, reading the right blog). Even though I know every reno is different, this was one of my burning questions for Annie. Her response was one I have heard before and it makes a lot of sense. She starts by going to Pinterest and pinning inspiration like mad. Sound familiar?? It’s also exactly what Emily does before any project. When you have a massive project looming before you, it helps to find all the inspiration you can to nail down what style/vibe/feeling you are going for. When you have to start ordering things like cabinets as soon as possible due to incredibly long lead times, it helps to be confident in the style you want VERY early on. For Annie and Marieke, after a lot of pinning and collaboration, they knew they wanted to create a calm, inviting home that feels like a vacation but still has a lived-in, eclectic feel.

With a full gut renovation like this, Annie shared that the hardest part was waiting for permits, enduring the shipping delays, and accepting extra long lead times. I am sure many of you can relate to that. But one thing Annie and Marieke had going for them is they work well together, they listen to and feed off of each other’s creativity, and they have fun doing it. Annie’s biggest tip for flipping homes if you are a beginner?? Find someone like Marieke who has been renovating houses and hotels in the US and in Holland for 10 years. That experience plus their undeniable working chemistry made the project so special (something I found palpable and so endearing while talking to Annie).

But that’s enough background. Let’s get into the reveal:

When you enter the home, you step into the entryway that leads to the open concept dining area, centered between the living room and kitchen. Even though I have only virtually toured the home just like you are about to, it’s easy to sense how calming and inviting it is right off the bat. Everything from the light wood floors, to the awesome floor-to-ceiling sliding glass doors, to the warm finishes, gives off a sense of calm and tranquility. It’s like you are entering vacation mode as soon as you walk in.

When I interviewed Annie over the phone, it was clear how passionate she is about renovating homes and in particular, how much love and care she and Marieke put into this one. There is so much thoughtful intention and attention to detail because they design homes as if they are designing for themselves. They always think about what they would desire in a home and apply those elements thoughtfully. And because they are both lovers of pattern, color, and bold designs there is no shortage of design risks here. So with that said, let’s head into the design risks and nitty-gritty details.

Design Risk #1: Task Lights Instead Of Canned Lights

There is so much about this living room that I want to highlight, but I’ll start with the ceiling lighting. One of my first questions for Annie was how they came up with the ceiling lighting plan because the task lights are unexpected and so cool. The way they are lined up in rows almost as if on a track really got my attention. A safe choice would have been to opt for canned ceiling lighting, but as you’ll see throughout this home tour, “playing it safe” is not their forte. Clearly, the options for ceiling lighting were limited due to the exposed ceiling beams (more on those below!) but the task lights are still a unique choice here. She informed me that they got these custom wall sconces from Rara Forma and just loved how they looked on the ceiling so they installed them across the living and dining room all the way to the kitchen. SO cool. They give off similar light as canned lighting would, but the exposed cylinder shape and brass finish are visually much more interesting.

Okay, now I can finally talk about the exposed beams. The truth is, they are my favorite design element and they are the first thing I asked Annie about. Are they original? Structural? Solely for aesthetics? I had to find out.

Turns out the beams were found during the renovation under the popcorn ceiling so of course they kept and restored them. I think with all the ups and downs that come with renovating, one major win has to be when you start removing a ceiling and find awesome beams that could bring in so much architectural interest. They refinished them, filled some holes, and stained them so they look modern and intentional. I am so happy they chose to keep them because can’t imagine this home without them.

Before we move on to the next room I think the fireplace deserves some recognition. It’s a beautiful, minimal focal point of the room so I had to know if a fireplace existed there before the renovation, or if it was an addition later on. Annie informed me a fireplace was there but they restored and redesigned it to match their intended laid-back California cool style. I just love the smooth stucco finish that integrates with the walls and the raised hearth. (Hot Tip: If you are renovating and thinking about your fireplace options, Emily wrote an in-depth guide here).

Now onto the decor. The home was styled and staged to sell by Pop Up Home, who did an incredible job accenting the architecture and MCM-meets-California-casual style with eclectic, vintage pieces. The amount of textures alone in this room (boucle chairs, jute rug, tiled coffee table) makes this room unmistakably cool. Also, is that a camel statue in the corner?? Why yes, yes it is.

Can you believe at one point the living room, kitchen, and dining room were all separated by walls?? Removing those walls was a no-brainer and the result is this incredible light and bright space. Open concepts famously “open” up the space, making the vibe more relaxed and inviting. But this layout also fulfilled another purpose. Annie shared that they really wanted the outside to feel like an extension of the living room, so having everything open and airy helps invite you to take in the outdoors.

Can we take a second to note the black accents here? In this mostly neutral room, the black pendant (stunning) and the black stools (equally stunning) really pop and break up all the warm tones making the space feel more dynamic. Now if you look out through the glass doors, the black casing around the exterior doors also pops against the neutral interior, accentuating the continuity between the outdoor and indoor space.

Design Risk #2: Oval-Shaped Kitchen “Island”

Though not technically a stand-alone island, the extended oval counter has me swooning. I love that it is extra-long and the curved countertop extends out past the cabinetry. The round shape mixed with a lot of hard straight lines adds movement and just the right amount of visual interest to this room. It’s exciting to look at and softens the space at the same time. It also plays off of the arched doorway in such a lovely way.

Speaking of round shapes, did you notice the bulb sconces? I love how they halted the task lighting from the living room on one side and added bulb ceiling lights to zone out the kitchen area. And then to top it off, the extra two sconces on each side of the hood are *chef’s kiss*.

How cool is that secret door? It leads to the pantry and is just one more example of how this design duo keeps us on our toes. In case you are curious (I know I was) it is more pricey to install a secret door but Annie informed me there are actually hidden door kits that you can buy to make the installation easier. The more you know!

Uh oh, after seeing this shot I just added one more life goal to my list: to have a wet bar in my home. It’s technically not my fault because this one is perfect and hard to forget about (I’ve tried). I love the retro triangle-shaped tile design that speaks to the MCM architecture and how the terrazzo countertop adds a cool texture. The woven cabinet fronts are so beautiful and also bring in the MCM vibe that just feels right for a wet bar, don’t you think?

I love how the kitchen is kept light and minimal by having no upper cabinets. It just feels right with the relaxed vibe of the home, plus I know there is plenty of storage because they custom-designed the cabinetry themselves. Once designed, they had a local woodworker who works on all of their projects build it for them. In fact, Annie and Marieke designed all of the kitchen cabinetry including the tall wood cabinetry on the other side and the cabinetry under the wet bar, and then their awesome woodworker made it all come to life. What a literal dream team! I personally love how the muted green color here mixes with the lightly veined marble and brass knob accents. It’s understated but still has that special custom look.

Design Risk #3: Beams Over Skylight

If you’re an avid reader of this blog, you probably can guess what I am about to say. We are BIG, resounding, perhaps annoyingly faithful advocates for skylights. They are simply undefeated when it comes to adding natural light, and every space benefits from organic natural light. This skylight in particular is interesting though because the beams from the living room extend to the kitchen and do not break for the skylight. This was an intentional design choice to keep the continuity and flow that the beams create across the living room and kitchen. All of us EHD ladies loved this choice and think it was such a cool risk to take (that 100% paid off).

I mentioned in the beginning that this was originally a 3 bedroom home, but Annie and Marieke saw the potential for a primary bedroom addition. It extends into the backyard with glass sliding doors facing out towards the pool, again emphasizing bringing the outdoors in. I love that this room has not one but two sliding glass doors so you really feel drawn to the outdoors. I imagine there is no desire to be a hermit in this room!

Before we move on, some decor elements I can’t get out of my head include but are not limited to: the double leather lumbar pillows, the tall matching sculptures on each nightstand, that amazing zebra print chair, and the “too small” rug. All those details create such a warm yet eclectic vibe that is intoxicating.

Design Risk #4: Mirror Mounted Faucets

Another subtle but impactful design risk enters via the mirror-mounted sink faucets. This is an up-and-coming trend we’ve been seeing and can’t wait to see if it will really take off. My guess is that it will because it looks high-end but isn’t a far jump from wall-mounted faucets. They are installed by cutting into the mirror, so it is a little precarious and labor-intensive but the result is really special. It can look classic but is a surprising option if you want to create a minimal but impactful design moment. Plus, you can go for a simple mirror and it will elevate the look instantly.

I love this shot of the arched doorway. Remember when arches re-entered the zeitgeist and we all felt like the main purpose in life is to have arches in your home?? I might still feel that way after seeing this.

Quick side note: Did you notice the short tile wall that separates the shower and bathtub? The thick horizontal grout lines mixed with the thinner vertical grout lines create a very subtle but impactful tiny design moment. So good.

Have you noticed all the window treatment-less windows? Are you annoyed with all of my rhetorical questions yet? Okay okay, I’ll stop. Back to the windows – as long as you have privacy, it’s a great way to have the outdoors become a part of the interior decor. The windows act as a way to literally “frame” the outdoors and in that way, can replace the need for art.

Design Risk #5: Asymmetrical Pendant

Anything asymmetrical is going to pack a design punch and is a tad bit riskier than going the symmetrical route. We always say that a powder bathroom is a fantastic place to play with trends, bold colors, fun details, and of course, wallpaper. I love how the off-center pendant is balanced with the faucet on the opposite side. And that sweet pink basin?? I am obsessed.

I have to say, every time I stare at this photo something new catches my eye. The unexpected art placement is wonderful, the double lamps and matching MCM nightstands are classic, I love the tight woven detail on the accent chair, but the large almost floor-to-ceiling window might be my favorite detail. With a plain room like this (structurally speaking), the window is essential for breaking up the walls and I think the choice to go for an oversized, vertical window instead of a horizontal one was a really exciting and unexpected choice.

I count not one, not two, but three tile shapes in this bathroom. I really love how the green cement tile (by Zia Tile) stops halfway up the wall, is replaced with narrower white tile, and then that tile stops before it hits the ceiling. It helps draw your eye up and yet grounds the space to keep the tile from feeling too overwhelming. And against the white and muted green color, the matte black finishes really pop.

Design Risk #6: Monotone Walls And Ceiling

Paint isn’t permanent but painting a room wall to ceiling this daring pink color wouldn’t be considered playing it safe. It’s true that monotone rooms are trending right now and I think this room could be conducting the train that I am about to hop on board. To make this trend work, you must pick a color that is special but not boring, bold but not too overwhelming. This peachy pink color achieves just that because it is easy on the eyes but feels fresh and exciting to look at.

Now if you are looking at the closet doors and wondering if they are original then you and I are on the same exact page. I asked for all you inquiring minds out there and yes, they are indeed the original closet doors. I love how the shape of the dowels speaks to the whimsical vibe of the room.

Design Risk #7: Oversized Shower Tile

More permanent finishes like tile are always going to be a little riskier to go bold with. In this bathroom, the chunky, cabana stripe tile in the shower makes an exaggerated statement that you can’t deny. What makes it even more enticing is the two-tone pink colors that add a playful effect that may not be “timeless” but packs a huge design punch. Finally, the brass shower head finishes add the perfect “jewelry” to round off the whimsical design.

One last note about this bathroom that makes it so special: It has this indoor/outdoor look and feel to it and that is because of the smooth stucco walls, which is (intentionally) the same finish as the exterior. Which brings me to the backyard!

When I asked Annie what her favorite room is, she didn’t surprise me when she said the backyard–and it’s not just because of how idyllic it is. It’s also because this is the first backyard design plan Annie and Marieke have ever executed and it’s STUNNING. Isabelle Dahlin Design (founder of deKor Living) assisted with the front yard landscaping, and once that part was completed it helped them reimagine the backyard. They planned a whole new layout including designing the awesome raised pool (scroll down to see the before and after – it’s dope). Then the tile was custom designed by Annie and Marieke and hand-poured. They used terra cotta pavers from Clay Imports and laid out the design by hand, measured the spacing between each one, and then it took about two weeks of labor to pour the concrete, place the pavers, and smooth it all out to be flush. It’s AWESOME and one of my favorite details.

Earlier I mentioned they wanted the patio to feel like an extension of the living room. Carving out a lounging area right outside is one way to do so, but this is also executed by having the pool raised rather than flush with the tile. The raised pool makes it feel like its own zone, so the rest of the patio becomes seamless with the indoors. It reminds me of a hotel pool, which isn’t totally surprising since Marieke has designed so many hotels herself. Like I said, this home was meant to feel like a vacation, and having everything open, airy, and seamless helps achieve that vibe.

To end the tour, we have this private little outdoor space right outside the primary bedroom and bathroom. Remember how I told you Annie and Marieke design homes as if they are designing for themselves? Well, this is another example of how they do just that. Knowing that privacy is a luxury, they really wanted to create a private outdoor zone so they added the tile wall to create this little outdoor nook.

And now, as a well-deserved treat for reading over 3,000 of my words, here are the spectacular before and afters:

Huge thanks to Annie and Marieke for sharing this project with us. It was such a blast for me to pore over every detail and I hope you had fun reading along :). I’d love to hear all of your favorite details so sounds off in the comments below!

*Design by Annie Segal and Marieke Ochtman of ASOM HOME
**Styled by Pop Up Home
***After photos by Corey Gibbons

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Katha
2 months ago

This must be one of the most beautiful homes I have ever seen. It exudes so much calmness and the wooden beams feel really grounding. I am in awe and desperate to move in…

🥰 Rusty
2 months ago

Annie and Marieke have done an amazing job! When I read “flip”, thought “Oh, no”, but it looks more of a ‘proper’ renovation which is so refreshing. 😊
MCM ain’t my thing, however, this is fresh and interesting!
So many nice details, both inside and outside. I like yhe addded curves to the many angular features.

A couple of things got me though:
1. Such a jarring eyeball shock! Those ‘wall sconce can lights’ … I was like, “What on earth are those ugly things breaking the beautiful symmetry of those gorgeous beams?!?” No. Just, no.
2. The white PVC sink s-bend trap beneath the sink looks unfinished and could’ve so easily been hidden if the wood was just a little wider. Simple fix. Such a shame.

Overall, this is cool, calm and refreshing.
When the photos have me re-looking, I know it’s a layered, detailed vignette that has my eyeballs transfixed.
Like a deep breath.

Annie
2 months ago

There are some very nice elements here (although those mirrors below the faucets seem doomed to be constantly splattered and streaked), but mostly I think it’s strange to present “flip”ping as neutral/positive. Maybe it doesn’t matter much in an already insanely pricey market like California? But in general, flipping drives up house prices and speeds up gentrification, putting homebuying further out of reach for middle-class and working-class families. Things have only gotten worse since massive corporations like Zillow have gotten into the act.

Amber
2 months ago
Reply to  Annie

This was my first thought too. Fortune presented an analysis on this point just a couple weeks ago.

https://fortune.com/2022/06/26/housing-market-and-home-price-boom-made-bigger-by-investors-and-wall-street/

Tarynkay
2 months ago
Reply to  Amber

Thanks for linking to that article! That was a fascinating read.

Aside from the inescapable ethical issues of house flipping in particular and participating in capitalism in general, the house tour is beautiful. My favorite parts were the beams over the skylight in the kitchen and the pool.

Renee
2 months ago
Reply to  Annie

I believe that so many people have gotten into flipping homes as a business is because the home-building industry has been mostly taken over by big national companies, leaving the independent home-builder out in the cold. Therefore, many would-be home builders have turned to flipping homes.
My father was a home-builder in the 80s and I was a flipper for a while because it had become too hard to get into the home-building industry. Now, even flipping is being infiltrated by the big guys like Zillow, making it harder for flippers to survive. For that reason (and the rising costs), I have gotten out of house flipping.

Mouseface
2 months ago
Reply to  Annie

Yes some nice things but the splatterfest mirrors are bad, and difficult to change because of the faucets. The lack of medicine cabinets throughout is super vexing. Ask me how I know.

Lauren
2 months ago
Reply to  Annie

Gentrification is a complex subject, however, in most cases, it doesn’t actually displace low-income individuals, it tends to prevent them from moving in. Many long-time residents appreciate the benefits of gentrification – better amenities such as parks, less crime, etc. I live in a Midwestern city and my neighborhood is experiencing gentrification and I am grateful for it. Historic homes are being saved, parks are getting safer, better schooling options are moving in, etc. I found this article very informative: https://www.nationalcivicleague.org/ncr-article/we-need-to-change-how-we-think-about-gentrification/#:~:text=Gentrification%20is%20a%20highly%20contested,moving%20into%20previously%20affordable%20neighborhoods.

Also, this home is in Hollywood Hills – this neighborhood has been historically affluent, so this renovation is not contributing to gentrifying it. LA is generally an expensive place to live – there are many fantastic cities across the US that are significantly more affordable. If people want nice weather year round, they’re going to have to pay top dollar for it because of demand. It’s simple economics.

Annie
2 months ago
Reply to  Lauren

Yeah, it’s tricky, and obviously the Hollywood Hills is a different kettle of fish, and I know this site has written thoughtfully about it in the past. I will say that listening to this episode of a podcast that was about HGTV “Flipping” shows put a bad taste in my mouth about flipping: https://citationsneeded.libsyn.com/episode-116-the-pro-gentrification-aspirationalism-of-hgtvs-house-flipping-shows

Bo
2 months ago
Reply to  Annie
  • …think it depends on what is being gentrified. As you said the Hills are already expensive but a long vacant house in Cleveland is a different matter. In fact It could be making a neighborhood attractive to families.
Stassy
2 months ago
Reply to  Lauren

I agree – it’s complicated. I live in a neighborhood that’s maybe 50% single family home rentals & the landlords haven’t put any (or very little) investment into the homes for a long time. If an investor was willing to buy & renovate the homes it would make the neighborhood a lot nicer, (& also probably make the rental conditions a lot safer…it’s amazing what landlords can get away with) but would displace people because rent would then increase.

Mouseface
2 months ago
Reply to  Lauren

As a lower income artist and renter – who usually works at least 2 jobs and a side hustle- I been gentrified out of two neighborhoods over 30 years- Chicago’s Bucktown, Brooklyn’s Williamsburg. From my direct experience gentrification DOES displace low and middle income individuals. I guess if you OWN a home – out of reach for many working class and middle income people – it can seem nice but if you rent its an absolute killer. The article you linked to says so in that a lack of affordable housing is a symptom of lack of equity. They discuss the need for fair housing laws, which LA sorely lacks. Demographic changes bring homogenization of the neighborhood- Small mom and pop businesses like the local bodega displaced by national chains like Starbucks and J Crew, and homogenization of the age, ethnicity and culture of the residents. The neighborhood loses its flavor and becomes bland. If we want parks and better schooling, we should fight for them within diverse and vibrant communities- along with fair housing policies. And its not just about living in a hip city or year round sunshine. There uis a massive shortage of affordable housing for working… Read more »

Chelsea
2 months ago
Reply to  Lauren

“[Gentrification] doesn’t actually displace low-income individuals, it tends to prevent them from moving in.”

Are you actually saying this? Boo poor people?! Wow, what a horrible display of snobbery. I’m so happy that you and your rich friends get to reap the benefits of gentrification while never coming into contact with a poor person.

🥰 Rusty
2 months ago
Reply to  Annie

Good point, Annie.👍

Karine
2 months ago
Reply to  Annie

Thank you for saying what I was thinking right off the bat.
As a California native who has lived with overpriced real estate most of her life, yes it does matter.

Susan
2 months ago

These are my fav types of posts. Meaty and packed full of images to pore over. Your commentary also helps me see things I would otherwise miss. So good. This house took risks yes but it feels so liveable and nice.

Have you ever done a house tour of a small bungalow where they DIDNT make it open concept? I’d love to see a post war bungalow styled to look great. That form of house is ubiquitous in the US but in my opinion really hard to decorate and style because of the small scale. Sprawling beautiful California spaces connected to the outdoors make this Midwest gal so jealous.

🥰 Rusty
2 months ago
Reply to  Susan

I prefer rooms myself.
Open concept is a trend that’s passing, thanks in part to Covid and WFH necessities.
I’m interested to see what flows in the post-Covid-shock world …. coz, let’s dace it, we’re so NOT post-Covid yet. It’s still here and still evolving!⚠️

kiki
2 months ago
Reply to  Susan

I have a theory that open concept floor plans partially caught on because they are so easy to shoot and look beautiful in a photo. “rooms” are MUCH harder to shoot. But, the reality is living in rooms is very pleasant, while living open concept is rather…chaotic…(at least in my family. hahaha). The entryway of my house is SO LOVELY, but impossible to get a picture of!! It’s paneled in black walnut with a stained glass door and beautiful green ceiling. As a former stylist, it drives me bonkers that I just can’t get a good photo of it no matter what I do. But, it’s an amazing space to be in IRL. And isn’t that what really matters? IRL?

Paula
2 months ago
Reply to  Susan

Yeah, I’ve seen smaller houses in my neighborhood that were flipped and made “open concept.” They looked like you’d be living in a converted garage. Not appealing to me.

okay. this is just all too good. i need to come back later when i’m not working to fully soak it in. there is LITERALLY too much amazingness to look at. gah!

🥰 Rusty
2 months ago

MCM…Lovely! Right up your alley, gurl!

Jennifer
2 months ago

I think they did a lovely job, and the staging choices make the space feel even more elevated and special. I’m perplexed by the choices they made to the front yard, however–it’s hard to tell from the one photo but it looks like they removed all of the pavers near the driveway and front door and replaced with dirt and a handful of stepping stone pavers? The curb appeal is a bit lackluster now, not to mention it’s harder to walk on just those handful of pathway pavers that also seem to be too awkwardly spread out. The complete lack of front curb appeal is such a stark contrast to the luxurious, thoughtfulness of the backyard patio and pool.

Nicolettte
2 months ago
Reply to  Jennifer

I too was very confused when I saw the front yard. It looks like dirt or DG that will get that beautiful white house so dirty (ask me how I know).

Vera
2 months ago

I enjoyed this very much, thank you Ryann! Those first two shots when you come in made me feel so happy and relaxed. This would be a dream to stay in. I want to get this vacation vibe in my home. It feels breezy if that makes sense (you know, like Monica 😂).

Another design risk they took was losing the kitchen window to add the principal suite. The skylight and openness mitigate this of course.

What is the 0.25 bathroom? I am so curious lol!!! Is there an outdoor shower? (I would think the powder room would count as 0.5.)

Normally I am not big on “aspirational” content but THIS was just a lovely breath of fresh air!

Tricia
2 months ago
Reply to  Vera

Vera, I had the same question about the bathrooms initially — what is a 0.25 bathroom? But I think they meant that the house now has 2 full baths and 2 three-quarter baths. If that’s the case, can we as a society please decide to call it a 4-bathroom home? Because “adding up” bathrooms with fractions and decimals tends to get confusing when there are multiple powder rooms and three-quarter baths. Lol.

That said, what a gorgeous renovation! Thanks, Ryann!

Sheila
2 months ago
Reply to  Vera

I agree adding bathroom fractions is not a helpful way of describing anything! Per the real estate listing, the house has two full baths, one 3/4 bath (sink, toilet & shower, no tub) and one 1/2 bath (sink, toilet)

StephanieZ
2 months ago

The home is lovely and I like a lot of their choices (not counting the faucet out of the mirror and those ugly lights scattered about, but man, “flipping” makes me sick. Some lovely person who couldn’t come in at the top of the market could have bought it and put in sweat equity for a beautiful home, but instead it gets bought and flipped (albeit prettily) for lots of money. While this one was done well, so many in my neighborhood have been done shoddily and yet they are still priced double what they were 4 or 5 years ago. It makes me sad and quite angry.

Sheila
2 months ago
Reply to  StephanieZ

I totally agree with your dislike of “flipping” when there is very little value added and I find it unfortunate that the term was used here as it bears little resemblance to the shoddily done flips you mention. This house was purchased for $1.9 million, underwent a year-long inside and outdoor renovation that added significant value, listed for $3.5 million and sold for $4.3 million. I’d call this a very well done speculative luxury renovation. Yes, I suppose someone got priced out of a $1.9 million fixer-upper and the trend, particularly at lower price points is disturbing but this seems like a good example of the concept.

Cris S.
2 months ago

Of course gorgeous and so very California – makes me miss my grandparent’s home in Pacific Beach. I have a question about the kitchen though – with no upper cabinets you would want the lower cabinets as usable as possible but they all seem to be regular cabinets instead of mixing in more functional (but also more expensive) drawers. I’d love to know if some of the cabinet doors open to interior drawers, if they have any shelf lifts inside, etc?

Deborah
2 months ago

Lovely tour and commentary (so helpful!) – thanks Ryann! The changes to the front of the house color, skylight, pendant and the landscaping against the house (plus they kept the palm!) are lovely, but the rest of the front yard looks unfinished and kind of sad. The beams add so much architectural interest, love how they integrated the kitchen skylight with the beams! The wood floors so pretty so much better than the shiny, hard marble from an earlier remodel, same with the dark kitchen cabinets, those weren’t original either. I love the powder room with it’s cockatoo/forest wallpaper, perfect with the house location up against Griffith Park (how wonderful that is!) though I do not like white faucet or exposed plumbing, the pink sink is lovely. The primary bath with the faucets installed into the mirrors would be a chore to keep looking nice because EVERY time someone uses them water and soap will splash and need to be wiped EVERY single time to maintain. I prefer that mirrors are hung higher and generally with a frame. One of my favorite design choices is the raised swimming pool! Having the raised edge (short wall) makes it look more like… Read more »

Beth
2 months ago

Unpopular opinion here: I just don’t understand this renovation. Sure, there are plenty of beautiful elements (the weird ceiling lights notwithstanding), but they took a house with strong midcentury modern bones and tried to make it into a California Spanish style, with the exposed beams and terra cotta pavers. LA has plenty of Spanish-style homes. I wish they had played up the MCM charm. This flip is a flop for me.

monique scronce
2 months ago

Beautiful!! What color was used on the exterior?

Paula
2 months ago

Wow. That “before” was really of an era. I’m not a big MCM fan, but this house is o.k. I was a little worried about that big open room with all the hard surfaces though. That’s gotta be hella loud and echo-y. No shade in the backyard. That’s a hot part of town. You’ll roast. I’m so glad they got rid of that awful granite floor tile. Hideous.

J.
2 months ago

Something about this home leaves me absolutely cold. Just a feeling, but I see no warmth there at all. Maybe it is the staging, maybe because it seems pretentious.–but a lot of the homes toured on this site are that way, and don’t leave me feeling quite this way. When I went through the photos, I was just left with an “empty” vibe.

Rachel S
2 months ago
Reply to  J.

Yeah I didn’t love the staging either. I know it’s all very ‘LA’ but didn’t feel like it suited the house or the reno.

2 months ago

Two thoughts here: one, while I understand the geographic west coast focus of the EHD team, could we please see some featured houses from other parts of the country, in particular northern and northeastern states (where outdoor living is definitely seasonal)? Two, while I like some of the permanent renovation changes (especially the pool and patio), I am not a fan of this house in the design risks and the staging – it seems like a good number of busy and trendy choices have been made. All those lighting choices will look dated in just a few years, for one. The artwork and furniture is not at all to my taste (sorry). But what most catches my eye (which it should not) is the ceilings with all of those exposed stained joists (are they really beams?) To my mind, the ceiling and/or ceiling accents shouldn’t be darker than the rest of the permanent surfaces, or at the least they should be tonally balanced with other features throughout the rooms. All that said, I love reading and learning! Keep up the good work!

Margaret
2 months ago

I love it, and as a retired person with no small children running around, I’m ready to move into it! It’s gorgeous! Thank you for sharing and giving such great commentary.

Jan
2 months ago

Thoroughly enjoyable post. Lovely home. Is it possible to get information about the kitchen countertops? They are gorgeous!

Rosie
2 months ago

There was a lot of creativity and work that went into this flip and I enjoyed the entire post. However, I would never feel cozy and safe without the privacy of window coverings. At night, a window becomes a big black hole. I guess I have seen one too many scary movies, but I couldn’t relax in a home where I felt exposed, even if the home was in a very private location.

priscilla
2 months ago

LOVE

Dale
2 months ago

L O V E this home! Can you tell us the paint colors please?

Sarah
2 months ago

This is so absolutely gorgeous. I would feel like I was on vacation all the time if I lived here. I’m ready to purchase! (Just need money and a job in California…)! Thank you for the lovely and inspiring way to start my weekend!!

2 months ago

Definitely a creative remodel. Had some very interesting ideas. I really liked a lot of things about the house. But, it needed window treatments, and really not a fan of the dirt front yard. I know we are in a drought here in LA, but even the original pavers looked better. Or some gravel or pretty rocks. Sorry, just my opinion! I LOVED the terracotta pavers mixed with concrete in the backyard around the pool!

Patti
2 months ago

Ryann, your writing is just a joy to read. I hate it when it stops!

2 months ago

There are so many colors, materials and ideas in this home that I love. In fact a number of them are in the plans for the home we are building currently. However, one thing jumps out at me. The sharp right edge tiled corners around the tub look great, but they are a functional mistake. They are dangerous for children and they make it difficult to clean the tub. Either use bull-nosed tiles or use a free standing tub. If you need horizontal planes for bath products there are better alternatives.

Dana
2 months ago

I love so many elements of this home. A few things bug me – the exterior is SO BLAND. It doesn’t do any justice to the beauty inside. And I will jump in on the “flip/gentrification” conversation – yes, this is an expensive neighborhood and therefore it’s probably already geared towards a high-end buyer. HOWEVER, many first time homebuyers can only access a nicer neighborhood/bigger home if it is an unrenovated home that they will improve over time, or use as a stepping stone to a higher end home. As a recent first time homebuyer, we saw several former “starter” homes that had been renovated to be very high end, putting them out of our reach. In my experience, there are PLENTY of high end, luxury homes and very few accessible/starter homes. In the past, people would buy a starter home and then sell it when they wanted an upgrade. This left it to the next young family who could afford to enter the market. Flipping has changed this and taken formerly affordable homes and made them into higher end homes, taking many starter homes out of the market completely. This is an unfortunate trend that, coupled with lack of… Read more »

Sam
2 months ago

WOW This is absolutely stunning! I love this pool. The only thing I can say is that doors from https://minimasliding.co.uk/ would have been soooo cool, it would’ve just been frameless glass opened up to the pool. Still so beautiful though!

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