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What Is Happening At The Farm?? EVERYTHING

Some very exciting stuff has been happening at the farm, but I’ve been too busy with the book (and making decisions) to blog about it till today. After months of MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing) we passed inspections and it was time to close up the walls. It’s a graduation of sorts – a proverbial moving of the tassel to never go back just staring at wood and wire. With drywall up, we can actually see the rooms, design the furniture that could go in them, and picture our lives here. So here’s what is happening…

Drywall Went Up…

I was going to do a Drywall 101 post and perhaps I still will, but you want to see the farmhouse progress so here’s what you need to know…

There are five wall finish levels – “1” being basically just sheetrock with gaps and “5” being a smooth wall, like baby butt smooth. The higher the scale the more expensive and time-consuming it is. These days most new construction stop around “3” so they can spray orange peel, which is super forgiving, and can mask the seams really well. This is far faster and therefore cheaper, but it’s not most of our desired look. The whole thing sucks but it aligns with all of life – high quality/well done/refined anything…costs more. Cool!

Now what we’ve realized is that doing a simple, subtle “skip trowel” look is regional…and it’s not a thing in Portland. We did it at the mountain house and loved it. It’s a bummer they don’t do it here because it’s such a subtle look that is so much cheaper both in the application and in maintenance – it’s extremely forgiving for dings and future touch-ups. But you only want to do this if the drywall contractor actually knows how and their team is trained in this method. In our case, ARCIFORM, hadn’t worked with a drywall contractor who had done skip trowel – it’s not a thing in this region – so they weren’t willing to take the risk in a high-profile project. You can imagine if done wrong and heavy it would look bad. I wish I had reached out earlier in the process and found a drywall contractor that did do this in Portland – if they exist – but by the time we got around to this conversation, we were locked in and frankly needed to get going. So that’s all to say that this “skip trowel” subtle texture over a level 4 is regional. If your area does it, like at The Mountain House, it can be far cheaper than smooth walls. However, in our case, it was going to cost us more with a lot more risk, unknowns, and variables because our high-end contractor specializes in smooth wall finish. 

Before you start or even get a quote you should be sure about what walls (or portion of walls) you actually need a smooth coat or what can just be “fire taped”. When you can just “fire tape,” you don’t need to go through the laborious, messy process of “mudding” (more on that below) if you are putting anything substantial over the top of it – like paneling or tile. So walk through the house and mark them. Otherwise, you are spending time and money on walls that just need sheetrock and fire tape. Do keep in mind wallpaper requires smooth walls in case that may be a “someday” want. Arciform did say that some areas or homes might not even require fee tape so just talk with your contractor!

After you have made your decision here’s what they’ll do: 

The Step By Step Of Drywall

1. They hang sheetrock (just say “rock” if you want to be cool) – also sheetrock is just a brand name of drywall – like Kleenex to tissue.  
2. They tape and mud the seams, essentially spackling them with mud to make the seams disappear.
3. They sand the mud down flat, this makes a big-ole mess…
4. They mud again.
5. They sand again, more mess…
6. They use flashlights and black lights to make sure that they are super, super flat and smooth. 
7. They prime the walls, ready for paint in like 3 months 🙂  

All the fine particles that are created during the sanding can really clog your HVAC system, so it is wise to turn it off during this process and then to have your ducts cleaned and filters replaced when it is all done.

Our house took 2 weeks for this process and I’d say that 30% of our house is paneling or tile (or windows – ha). So of our 3800 square feet, not all of it is sheetrocked. 

The sheetrock totally transformed the house – we now have rooms! We can imagine the space. It is so exciting and relieving. 

OOH MY. The white oak interior Sierra Pacific Windows and doors are basically the more traditional version of the farmhouse that we love – that wood on the inside is everything. 

Windows And Doors

Skylights 

The kitchen and primary bedroom specifically are so bright it’s incredible, thanks to the Velux Skylights. Hilariously, we decided to not put them in the sunroom because we thought it would be bright enough, but due to the way it’s facing and the fact that the doors open to a covered porch it’s not as bright as we had hoped so we are putting in two skylights post-drywall (not ideal, but it’s only a day’s work since the framing worked with the size of the skylights). Lesson learned – ALWAYS put in skylights (and we have been using Velux for years). I was scared that you’d drive up and see them on the exterior of the sunroom and it would distract from the charm of the brick and windows, but the grade is so much lower that you don’t really see the top of the roof even up close. 

Primary Bedroom

Cabinets Are Going In!

The cabinets arrived from Unique Kitchens and Bath and they are SO BEAUTIFUL. I’ve only seen the mudroom and the pantry thus far – they are waiting on the flooring to be installed before doing the kitchen cabinets, but they are solid, high quality, and just beautiful. The mudroom is white oak and the pantry is painted Slate Tile by Sherwin-Williams

Wood Flooring Has Acclimated

We have our Zena Forest floor that had to acclimate for 10 days in the house, post drywall, to ensure that it doesn’t expand and contract with the weather. It is now being installed and looks SO PRETTY. 

Tile Installation Has Begun

The tilers came in and as soon as the drywall was done, they were in pouring the subfloor, putting in radiant heat in the first floor tiled areas, and prepping all areas. It’s the eye candy we’ve been waiting for and is extremely satisfying in every way. 

The sunroom tile needed some troubleshooting with the victorian border but oh my goodness it’s going to be so insane. It’s happy and bright and while it is busier than the rest of the house, it feels quarantined into this space – like it were a conservatory addition that feels special in its own right. Once we get some natural wicker, a big wood dining table, and plants in there it will be this fantasy indoor/outdoor year-round happy room that I’ll work out of. 

The mudroom tile is so awesome – you can see the brownstone texture that Pratt + Larson does so well – which feels more utilitarian than a smooth finish. 

The Kids Bath Tile

The kid’s bath (whose design plan I haven’t even shown you yet) is the only one that came on a net so it was a bit easier to install – the kids collectively chose the green and I love it. Just wait till you see the wall tile. 

The main bath has yet to be started with the tile but they prepped and leveled the floors, laid the radiant heat (we are doing electric not hydro), and we showed the tile setters what we are doing and he said, “I have two gray hairs right now, I’ll have 40 by the time I’m done with this.” And YET…he was super excited! 

How Are We Doing??

I’m feeling ready to move in, trying to manage my impatience, dealing with decision fatigue, endlessly grateful to be doing this, excited about the future, bursting with joy seeing our decisions to come life – all of the feelings. While I was in New York, Sarah and the ARCIFORM team were there troubleshooting everything which I’ll show you on stories, as it’s all happening fast now. It’s amazing and yet we are still a few months out from living there. I want to publicly thank Jamie, our site lead, Adam and the rest of the build team, for dealing with the insanity – both my border line pathologies as well as managing all the subs. We are at the mutual frustration point in the renovation process that is inevitable. The months near the end where the client/homeowner is like “wait, it’s going to be how much longer?” and then proceeds to manically push and push, questioning the timeline, desperate to find the “off” nozzle for the firehose that is just shooting out cash so hard it could knock over a tree. And as a result, the GC and building teams are frustrated right back at the client (not us of course, we “get it”, we promised them we’d be “such good clients” – hahaha), because there are so many moving parts to renovating a house. Things take a lot longer than they look, high quality costs a lot and rushing the process isn’t good for the quality of the result. For those of you mid-construction or about to be – just remind yourself daily, “it is a privilege to be renovating, it is a privilege to be renovating”. It can be so hard, long and feel never ending. I see you. But it’s going to be worth, I promise and we are so lucky to be doing it. More to come soooooon. xx

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🥰 Rusty
1 month ago

Trumpet sounds!!!🎺😀
Now I have to go re-read it and stare at thd photos some more.

Emily R
1 month ago

It’s so nice in New England that smooth walls are the norm. I’ve never seen a house here with anything but that.

Emily
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily R

Yep – there’s not even an option offered for texture – you’d have to explicitly ask for it!

Alexandra Rose
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily R

Ditto in the Midwest!

Susan
1 month ago
Reply to  Alexandra Rose

Maybe it depends on where in the mid-west? All new construction here in my part of the Midwest has textured walls. Trying to repair and match texture as a painter is such a pain.

Amber
1 month ago
Reply to  Susan

Yes! Smooth walls are so much more future proof. I once lived in a house with partly wallpapered walls. When I wanted to remove it, that section was smooth, but the painted section had texture. Insane.

Elisabeth
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily

The skip trowel finish looks like our old plaster walls (1940 Los Angeles bungalow) — I love this look!

Christa
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily

I’m fine with skip trowel (it’s standard in California) but the paint has got to be flat. I strongly dislike the look of skip trowel with sheen. Recently had to do vintage stucco exterior and it took a while to find guys who can do that heavy ‘stucco over stone’ texture that was used on Tudors and Spanish Revival houses pre-1950s. All textures can be good, it just depends on the style of the house.

Mariele
1 month ago
Reply to  Alexandra Rose

Yep. In Iowa I’ve only ever seen smooth walls or very light, slightly bumpy texture. It’s like the subtle version of orange peel, I love it.

AzureSongLA
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily R

I live in Los Angeles and my house is 17 years old. I always thought I had smooth walls but, looking closely, it’s actually skip trowel!

Elise
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily R

I love the smooth walls now that we are back living in MA. I hated the textured walls in our CA apartments.

michaela
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily R

It seems like smooth walls would be ideal for repairs! I have orange peel (although it has less relief than the example photo above) and I had to patch and repaint a section after removing some shelving that the previous owners installed then painted around…I still haven’t figured out how to match the wall texture and it feels like a glaring eyesore! I did buy some spray wall texture but it came out way too heavy. Anyone have advice for how to fix this?

Erin Dae
1 month ago

Yay!! So excited to wake up to this post. It is the exciting part, where rooms start to look like rooms. The tile, wood floors, and doors/windows are gorgeous!

Tarynkay
1 month ago

I’m in NC and smooth walls/ceilings are also the automatic standard here. But in FL where my family is, you would have to pay extra for smooth. I wonder if it is state by state or if it’s roughly regional? Having put up drywall before, I can understand charging extra, there is a real art to getting smooth walls!

Ally
1 month ago
Reply to  Tarynkay

So true!
I’m in Virginia (after living most of my life in California) and smooth walls seem to prevail here too. Shocked to find that “skip trowel” isn’t a thing in Portland — or apparently here! — as it makes so much sense over the long term. And I like the look of it.
The farmhouse is looking great! And I love the new book. It’s a wonderful blend of how-to manual, and eye candy…

Kelly
1 month ago

So exciting! It’s nice to know that you like a bright bedroom (I thought I was the only one : ). The sunroom is just going to be dreamy! Enjoy!

Jill
1 month ago

I am also thinking about adding skylights to some of the bedrooms in my house. What is your plan for blocking the light when you are sleeping?

Katie
1 month ago

Yay this is the exciting part and I’m so happy you’re showing us things in “real time”, not waiting for the big reveal!

Amy
1 month ago

Wow, everything is looking amazing!!! Can’t wait to see the kitchen and sunroom as they are my personal favorites. I think the primary bedroom has too much light for my taste, as i like it very dark when i sleep. The tile choices are great and I am looking forward to see how the colors flow throughout the rooms. Great job so far and please keep sharing the updates!!

Madeline Beede
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily

I had this same thought. I can’t imagine putting sky lights in my bedroom argh– bright sun streaming in from above is the last thing I want — migraine city! May I ask why with all those windows you felt like you needed more. Love your designs and sometimes I wonder about the extra expenses and items that are added …

Alexandra Rose
1 month ago

Oh my goodness, so exciting! Please tell us that you will be posting some bathroom design plan posts before they are done with construction!

Laura
1 month ago

Oh my, that sunroom makes me smile.

Courtney
1 month ago

This is so funny, because my dad is a project manager for a commercial drywall company and I know all the lingo. I’ve seen this whole process done many times. “Mud” is actually slang for joint compound (the official name). And is orange peel a West Coast thing? I’ve never seen anything other than the smooth finish on the East Coast, but have seen orange peel in Oregon and California.
Either way, you’re right! It’s looking less like a reno and more like a house, which is so exciting. And there is so. much. light from all those gorgeous windows and skylights!

Michelle
1 month ago
Reply to  Courtney

Nope orange peel is everywhere but I’d likely look for it post 1970s builds in Midwest anyway. Before that plaster and lathe was the norm so the skills were there. “Newer” housing, basically since Sheetrock became widely accepted, brought the evolution in finish treatments as skilled mud work is harrrdd. Basically anyone strong enough to lift Sheetrock can install it. But the tape and mudd labor takes finesse. On large crews there is one guy or a small team that only does that. ESP since it’s ideal to do before flooring, paint, etc. the ability to get results quickly is key. A,so consider regions where adobe is the common surface inside (and out). Similar yet different. Construction is more regional that most people know. I love that Emily builds in some of the cross over between these skills and the artisans that make tiles or cabinets. Bringing it together is just as takent based but often under appreciated.

Michelle
1 month ago
Reply to  Michelle

K I tossed 1970 out there with all the confidence of an internet know it all. No idea what year this transition occurred. Maybe post WW2?

Deborah
1 month ago
Reply to  Courtney

Orange peel is definitely here in the South! When we first moved to the Gulf Coast I had never seen it before but it’s everywhere! It is definitely hard to match/repair for a novice like myself. But, they do have it in cans and you can spray as heavy or as light as you need.

Jane
1 month ago

I can’t wait to see the end result, everything looks beautiful! But I loved this line – “desperate to find the “off” nozzle for the firehose that is just shooting out cash so hard it could knock over a tree.”

We’re in the midst of a third floor addition and my oh my can I relate to the cash firehose!

🥰 Rusty
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily

I say “I’m haemorrhaging money out throughout my toes!” I know the feeling, yet on a smaller scale obvs.

Jennifer
1 month ago
Reply to  Jane

Yes! That line makes me nervous as our kitchen / main floor remodel is just beginning. I already use the mantra “this is a privilege”, so seeing it from Emily makes me smile. Now I need to dig through the archives for the project life cycle graph and put a print on the wall. Maybe it will help ease marital or client-contractor tensions when we hit that “mutual frustration” phase. 🙂

Eliot
1 month ago

I must say, I was skeptical about the sun room tile when you initially wrote about it, but I’m a believer now. It looks incredible–like the conservatory from the Clue game brought to life.

Tara
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily

Isn’t that what it’s all about?! To be delighted when you walk into the room?! LOVE IT!

Erin
1 month ago
Reply to  Eliot

Ha! Perfect description Eliot! I am now also a solid believer in Brian’s glass roof dream. Is it too late to change that part???

Lisa
1 month ago

Oh my gosh it’s going to be so beautiful! It already IS beautiful!

1 month ago

Drywall texture names and customs are so weird. When I think of skip trowel, I think of adding sand to the mud, leading to quite a rough/heavy texture and it’s almost always just used for ceilings. Knockdown is also fairly heavy, usually used for ceilings, but usually consists of spraying on mud and then troweling over it (knocking it down)–and to me, looks very different than what you have pictured. What you call skip trowel, I thought of as a light old-world/plaster texture. It gets really confusing when there really aren’t any standard names and practices. I’m doing my own drywall, and I just ended up figuring out my own methods.

🥰 Rusty
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily

Speaking of this being an international blog:
Ya know what?!? In Australia, we don’t plaster over what you call “drywall”. The seams are done, then it’s sealed and painted.
We call drywall “plasterboard .” I don’t understand why it’s plastered?!??
We generally plaster brick walls. And most walls, external and internal, in Western Australia are both brick.
The east coast has more houses with wooden frames, not so much here. 🙂

Emily
1 month ago
Reply to  🥰 Rusty

In other regions, including the northeast US and mid Atlantic, where I’ve lived, we don’t plaster over drywall either. We just do the seams. I am still totally baffled why anyone would want to put any covering other than primer onto the drywall, but I think according to some previous Emily posts, the guess was that if no one in the area has learned to neatly tape and mud seams, its weirdly hard? And somehow less work to put a covering over the whole wall??

Mariele
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily

Funny enough, I drywalled my bedroom as a teen. Did all the taping and mudding myself. Didn’t seem that hard to just feather it gently… seemed a whole lot harder and more wasteful to plaster over EVERYTHING. Go figure…

Carrie
1 month ago
Reply to  🥰 Rusty

Unless the process is not complete, you can see in some of the photos here (like in the kids bath) that the seams are done, and the drywall screws are covered, and that’s it. The entire wall is not plastered.

That said, my house is from 1959 and the walls are drywall covered with about 1/2-inch (a bit over 1cm) of plaster. It may have been done in a transition period between traditional lathe & plaster and modern drywall methods.

Emilie Cederman
1 month ago
Reply to  Emily

Emily. You must go out to the Bend area. All the newer construction looks like that skip trowel finish. Brasada ranch, caldera springs. I don’t care for it personally, but prefer it over the hideous orange peel that they love here on the west coast. I’m used to smooth walls from Australia, and I always study walls wherever I go because I have a personal vendetta against textured walls. I really only see it up and down the west coast, or cheap old buildings from like the 70s. We had contractors here I Portland who insisted on museums have smooth walls! Gahh!

🥰 Rusty
1 month ago

Yeah, basically all the houses in Australia are smooth, except in the really old houses like mine andthen the texture is on brick walls.
Nobody here textures ‘drywall’. The whole process seems unnecessary to me.

Jessica
1 month ago

Oh wow I adore everything!! Love the windows. And actually really love the sunroom tile which I wasn’t sure about at first.

Lea
1 month ago

It is getting soooooo good!!! Gah! I’m so excited and want to see more, more, more!!!

Lia
1 month ago

Where I live, a good drywaller should only have to mud and sand the seams once. If they are doing it twice that doesn’t sound like a very good drywall contractor to me.

Kj
1 month ago
Reply to  Lia

Not necessarily. Here’s a good article about drywall finishing levels: https://www.finehomebuilding.com/project-guides/drywall/levels-of-drywall-finishing

Caitlin
1 month ago

Quick note about drywall taping – there is a difference between regular drywall mesh tape that is used for standard interior wall finishing, and fire tape (which you reference above) which is used for fire rated assemblies. Fire tape is not the typical product that is used for your average interior wall (residential or commercial).
The more you know!

Mariele
1 month ago
Reply to  Caitlin

Thank you! That was driving me crazy.

1 month ago

Wonderful article thankss!!

emily jane
1 month ago

“dopamineoxytocinserotonin, and endorphinssometimes referred to as D.O.S.E.” (dictionary.com)
Not sure which chemical is responsible (see above ; ) but, I am experiencing a delicious contact high of euphoric giddiness after absorbing this post (the sun even came out as I was reading!). WhooHoo -congratulations!!!

🥰 Rusty
1 month ago
Reply to  emily jane

🤣🤣

Sheila
1 month ago

Absolutely love the green tile! Is it the same brand as the b & w tile? Such a gorgeous shade & finish. Inspiration for my bathroom remodel

🥰 Rusty
1 month ago

The walls in mh nearly 100 yr old girl are a combination of what you’ve called “knockdown” and “smooth.” The texture is mainly in the formal rooms, then half/half in a couple of others and smooth in the bedrooms.
I wonder what the textures are called here in Australia? That’s a rabbit hole for another day coz it’s after midnight and I need to be up at 6am to puppy sit tomorrow and … it’s pouring… and he (Murphy) is hairy?!?
🥴 Um, no mudroom here! Yikes!!!

I’m absolutely drooling at the walls going in!🤤 The bedroom reminds me so much of The Mountain House.
Soooo many skylights!!! Probs too many for me thoigh, coz I like a dark, snuggly bedroom, but beautiful and airy.

The new windows are really sweet and speak to the originals. 🤗
I’m still wishing you’d used your patio tiles from LA in the sunroom. Those seem to SHOUT at my eyeballs, but I will wait, because you surely will make it all lovely and I’ll see the magic unfold.

Very tasty reveals, bit-by-bit, just the way I like ’em! 🥰

Steph
1 month ago

It looks like there is a door to the basement from the pantry? Is that livable space down there, too? So curious! Everything looks gorgeous. So excited for you!

Erin
1 month ago

Do not let it deflate you to hear that drywall is the half way mark in new construction, but it is 😉 This is so awesome to see it all come to life. I find myself much more interested in the processes and happenings behind the scenes than reveal posts that sometimes feel like an IG reel where one snaps their fingers and magically it is just done. A fun and fascinating way to encourage engagement and offer a place to share experiences and to see in real life all of the many human hands and ideas that go into building a home, thank you for that. The slate tile color is so you and modern and timeless and I am still completely overjoyed every time I see those beautiful original windows. Rock on you prairie goddess!

Christa
1 month ago

Woohooo!!!! Everything is gorgeous!!

JenMS
1 month ago

Please still do a Drywall 101 post! There’s a lot of great info in this post, but I’m sure there are even more details you could share!

1 month ago

We are building a new house in Bend, Oregon and just had the drywall done last week in a hand texture! Love the look and price!

KD
1 month ago

WOWZERS! This is the happy post I needed today.

Tara
1 month ago

It’s so exciting to see walls! Yay! We gutted our 1963 ranch house in 2019 and it was SO FUN! We might be weirdos, but I loved the process and actually wished it had taken longer. Mind you we were living in our barn and it’s really every horse girl’s dream to live next to her horses so we had that going for us. 10/10 agree that the time it takes to get what you want and done well is SO worthwhile! I adore our house now and it was a dream to have basically a brand new house a few months before the world shut down due to COVID and we were “stuck” in it for 6 weeks.

Alix
1 month ago

Yes, I must remember it’s a privilege to be renovating. Midway through a small but very finicky heritage renovation. Stress levels through the roof, money rushing out the door. Trying to keep my eyes on the prize but oof, it’s tough right now!

Sarah
1 month ago

Can you please do a post on radiant floor heating? I’d love to understand why you selected electric vs. hydro. I’m looking at doing this to my verrrry cold townhome with really high ceilings.

PM
1 month ago

Given your commitment to the environment, are you installing solar or other renewable energy sources?? If so, would love to see how it’s done as we’re considering it.

Sarah
1 month ago

Wow this is really surprisingly exciting as a reader hahah and hilarious amazing amount of skylights. I love it 😄

Billie
1 month ago

Loving all those 4 over 4 windows!😍

MD
1 month ago

love the choices! so many windows in the kitchen, windows in the pantry (never thought of that)

Krister
1 month ago

It all looks lovely, but there are drywall teams in Portland (and even the surrounding suburbs) skilled in the “skip trowel” approach. It’s possible that Arciform doesn’t know of any, but it’s also possible they don’t know every resource. I say this as someone who has twice opted for that finish, and I live in Portland. That aside, I’m excited you’re at this stage, because frankly internal walls and floors make it much easier to imagine the next steps.

A
1 month ago
Reply to  Krister

I’d say given the high demand for sub-contractors right now, it’s also likely that Arciform’s GC has a drywall crew (or two) that they trust & use frequently and had to lock down a commitment from in order to get on the right timeline for this job, and those crews just don’t happen to do that finish. Not so much a reflection on Arciform as it is pragmatic compromise!

Krister
1 month ago
Reply to  A

A, that’s probably the case, but the original poster made some very broad claims that this technique isn’t used in this region, and I still take exception to that. What’s done is done, and I’m sure the end result will look good.

Maya
1 month ago
Reply to  Krister

Unless the post was edited since you wrote this, I don’t see how anything in it contradicts what you says or justifies this slightly huffy response. Emily did say she found contractors who can do this technique– she just says it’s not STANDARD in this area, and the Archiform’s preferred contractors don’t do it.

blue (formerly anon)
1 month ago

So many comments already! I haven’t even started reading, but I really want to know why is the word “no” or “on” depending on how you read it (left to right, upside down, etc.) written on so many of the exposed 2 x 4s, and other wood surfaces that have yet to be covered up????

Erin
1 month ago

“NO” sheetrock

Kj
1 month ago
Reply to  Erin

Yes, exactly. They don’t want the sheetrock crew accidentally covering up wood that should be left exposed.

blue (formerly anon)
1 month ago
Reply to  Kj

Thanks for the explanations. 🙂

Kj
1 month ago

I must be confused by “skip trowel” because this is what was done on walls in Texas during the “Tuscan” era. Is this skip trowel?

BDD7FE8F-7644-4205-BA2E-BCDEECC051B9.jpeg
Louise
1 month ago

What do you do to keep the skylights clean and clear? I find they get so clogged up with dirt and debris on the outside esp. if at a low angle. I think our climate in Ireland is maybe similar to NW US. Do you just pay someone to come and clean them regularly? Or pivot them open and clean from the inside? I’d love to know what people do

Roberta Davis
1 month ago

Exciting!!! We all feel excited for you and can’t wait to see it done!

B
1 month ago

I have renovated and built homes and one thing I have learned is that even if you are putting on tile or wallpaper, the walls definitely need to be taped, sanded AND painted, if you ever envision changing the tile or the wallpaper down the road. If you tile over drywall with no prep, then when you remove the tile, it will damage the drywall to the point that it will need to be removed and replaced when you go to retile. Same with wallpaper, If the walls aren’t prepped with paint, when you go to steam the old wallpaper, or wet it to remove it, the moisture will damage the drywall. So saving money now, could mean problems down the road. Which is probably fine if you don’t intend to live in the house for a long time. But if this were my house, even if I never wanted to leave, I would probably want to do a little “refresh” in 10 or 15 years and I would be mad at myself for cutting corners at the building stage.

Anon
1 month ago

THREE MONTHS FOR MUD, SANDING AND PRIMER?????? TOTAL RACKET. OMG.
Everything is looking so pretty, though!

MelissaB
1 month ago

I’d say that the regional thing isn’t totally accurate – In the past few years we’ve taken 3 homes and 2 commercial buildings to the studs and three of those spaces were finished with a smooth texture somewhere between your level 4 and level 5 (leaning closer to a 5). They turned out absolutely beautifully and were done in the PNW. While it’s not the standard there are drywallers that do it up here. Like you said it just costs more.

I’d also mention that EVERY SINGLE TIME one or more outlets or j boxes get covered up by mistake. It’s a lengthy process to correct once everything is finished and you find a group of outlets or a light doesn’t work. We ALWAYS take a walk thru video and/or pictures of every room so we can easily tell where a mistake might have been made and have a better estimate on where to cut open the wall. It’s saved our bacon more times than I can count.

K
1 month ago

I just wanted to say thank you for those last few lines! We’re currently constructing a custom home near Portland. We’re in the last few weeks and I’m desperate for that fire hose to stop shooting out cash!

Nicole
1 month ago

Beautiful mudroom tiles – do you know what size they are? My supplier says 1 X 4 but I think they are larger? THanks for noting the source as P & L

Stacey Pray
1 month ago

Thanks for sharing! Love the floor tiles! Just wish I could afford it!

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