Article Line Long1
Design

The RIGHT Way To Paint Your Kitchen Cabinets and Save $$$ (Factory Finish Guaranteed)

One of the best ways to transform just about anything, is to paint it. Whether you go from dark to light or light to dark, or any hue in between you’re bound to transform a space dramatically with just a couple gallons of paint. The same is true for your kitchen cabinets. Painting cabinets a very specific color has become trendy to bring a custom-looking kitchen to the everyday home. It’s also more cost-effective than replacing your cabinets all together which can run about $10,000 on the low end. Today, I want to give you the 411 on painting your cabinets and getting a factory smooth finish. You will learn about the supplies I used, and every single step in the process from beginning to end. I even discuss refacing your cabinets which is still a cost saver compared to fully replacing them. This post is one you will want to bookmark and save for when you’re ready to tackle this project for yourself. It’s the tell-all for cabinet painting. So enough with the pleasantries, let’s just get to it shall we!?

Refacing Cabinets And Your Style Options

Before we get into the process of cabinet painting, let’s talk through refacing cabinets. Cabinet refacing is the process of changing cabinet doors, drawer fronts, hinges, and/or hardware while keeping the cabinet box (or frame) intact. There are three different fitting options to consider for your cabinet doors: partial overlay, full overlay, and inset. Partial Overlay is when your cabinet doors only cover a part of the frame. Full overlay cabinet doors cover the entire frame, and inset cabinet doors fit flush with the frame and has a more built-in aesthetic.

left to right: photo by sara ligorria-tramp, from: jess’ kitchen reveal | photo by veronica crawford, from: velinda’s diy kitchen reveal | photo by tessa neustadt, from: emily’s la kitchen reveal

My former cabinet doors were a partial overlay. And while that’s not a bad look at all, I wanted my kitchen to look and feel more custom. So I decided to reface the cabinets, with new doors that will cover the entire frame. Here are the befores:

I came across a company, Nieu Cabinet Doors, and I love that they make custom cabinet doors for any cabinet frame. Nieu has 16 door styles available to choose from. I knew that I wanted to keep the modern shaker style, but I wanted it to be special so I went with the Super Shaker Style, which has a beveled feature that just elevates the kitchen in an understated way. After sending in my new measurements, it took about 4 weeks for the newly primed doors to arrive. Now keep in mind that if you want to keep the size of your current cabinet doors, and instead just change the style, you can totally do that. There are three reasons why you may want to reface your cabinets: 1. You want to change from partial overlay to full overlay. 2. You want to change the style of your cabinet doors. 3. You want to replace a cabinet door with a cabinet drawer. Nieu gives you the option to have the doors arrive raw, primed, or painted. Yes, you read right, you can totally skip this tutorial and have your new doors painted for you, but where’s the fun in that!? You will only be responsible for painting the cabinet boxes. I’m glad that Nieu Cabinet Doors gives you that option to consider. Definitely, check them out!

Now let’s talking about painting…

Step 1: Organization

1. Sticky Notes | 2. Sharpie

This step is so crucial to the success of cabinet painting. Before removing doors and drawer fronts, even if you’re refacing, you need to label every door by number or letter. This will be considered the “door name”. Naming your doors/fronts will ensure that each door goes back to its original location and there’s no guessing when you’re ready to reinstall. You also want to have a designated drying area, and label each area with its corresponding door name. I also added the name of the door to its corresponding cabinet box. I also kept the hinges and any other hardware with the cabinet box it will be reattached to. Staying organized is KEY!

Step 2: Remove Cabinet Doors And Hardware

1. Drill | 2. Caulk

Now that you’ve learned about refacing, and labeled and organized your drying station, it’s now time to start removing cabinet doors, hinges, and all other hardware such as knobs and pulls. This process is easier and faster with a drill. Remember to keep your hinges and hardware with the corresponding cabinet box so that reinstallation goes smoothly. If you plan on using new hardware on your cabinet doors, go ahead and fill those holes with wood filler. In my case, I’m using new hinges, so I filled the old hinge holes on the cabinet frame. In this step, you should also use caulk to fill seams in the doors or frames.

Step 3: Cleaning Your Surface For Paint

1. Mixing Bucket | 2. Non-Scratch Scour Pads | 3. 120 Grit Fine Block Sanding Sponge | 4. TSP Heavy Duty Cleaner | 5. Microfiber Towels | 6. Denatured Alcohol| 7. Multi-Purpose Cleaner and Disinfectant

Whether you decide to reface your cabinets or not, you still have to clean your surfaces, and clean them well!! Our cabinets take a beating from everyday use; there’s grease from cooking, fingerprints, dust, and more layers of God knows what! So the cleaning step is important. One may ask, “Why not just skip to the sanding part?” The reason is that you don’t want to press oils or dirt into the wood grain. So scrub and clean first and then sand. I used Spray Nine with a scour pad to first degrease the frames and doors (If you’re refacing you only need to degrease the cabinet boxes, not your new doors). Then after scrubbing the surface I used TSP solution with a microfiber cloth to wipe down the Spray Nine solution. You want to repeat this step on every area that will be painted, that includes any existing trim or moulding.

Step 4: Sand And Prep

1. Drop Cloth | 2. Painter’s Tape | 3. Builder’s Paper | 4. Original Multi-Surface Painter’s Tape

Now that your surface is cleaned and degreased it’s time for prepping your kitchen. I taped off the inside of the cabinets, the floors, the counters, the appliances, doors, and windows. Any area in close proximity to the cabinets that will not be painted, needs to be covered. You will be surprised where paint could end up, so cover up even if you feel like it’s not necessary. For the floors, inside of the cabinet boxes, and countertops, I used painter’s paper. The paper roll comes in various widths so get what works best for your space. For the appliances, windows, doors/doorways I used plastic. You’re probably wondering why I have blue tape and green tape listed, and it’s because they function differently. I used the blue tape to lock down the paper to the floors and to tape the plastic, and the green tape is for extra blocking protection and to create sharp lines. At the toe kick of the cabinet bases, I added the green tape because I didn’t want any paint getting on the new floors. Any area that needs extra protection or sharp crisp lines use the green tape.

Sanding helps the paint adhere best to the cabinets. I started with a 120 grit sanding block to scuff up the cabinet frames. Then I used a dry/wet vacuum cleaner (you can use any vacuum cleaner) with a brush attachment to pick up the dust from sanding. I followed behind by wiping the surface with Denatured alcohol applied with a microfiber cloth.

Step 5: Prime

1. KILZ Interior Primer | 2. Paint Thinner | 3. Paint Brush | 4. Multi-Mix Pail | 5. Velour Rollers | 6. 220 Grit Sanding Block Sponge | 7. Hand-Held Pail with Brush Magnet

If you have wood cabinets, you will need an oil-based primer. I suggest using a respirator mask, or a regular mask with the windows open to protect yourself from the fumes. The smell goes away after a few hours but it is pretty intense so wear a mask. Since oil-based primer is really thick, in a separate plastic container, measure out the amount of primer you need, and then thin the primer by 20% using paint thinner. To apply the primer, use a velour roller and a brush. You want to do this a section at a time. Next, you need to smooth out your roll/brush strokes. Take a fine bristle brush, I purchased mine from a craft store and brush over the area you just primes. This will smooth out the primer, and create a smooth surface when it comes time to paint. If you don’t want to take all that time rolling and brushing, you can also spray the primer on with a paint sprayer.

Once your primer has dried, use a 220 grit sanding block to smooth out paint lines. Vacuum out the dust using a brush attachment, and wipe down your frames and doors with denatured alcohol using a microfiber cloth. You can apply another coat of primer if you need it.

Step 6: It’s Time To Finally Paint!

1. Graco Magnum X5 Sprayer | 2. 311 Tip | 3. Tack Cloth | 4. HomeRight Super Finish Max Sprayer | 5. Respirator Mask | 6. Paper Cups | 7. Benjamin Moore Advance Paint | 9. Painters Pyramid | 8. Painters Pyramid | 9. Graco Truecoat 360 Paint Sprayer | 10. Spray Shelter

Now to the fun part…PAINTING! Everything you’ve done up to this point, is to get a factory smooth finish with your paint. For painting the final color, I highly recommend investing in a paint sprayer. You don’t need a professional-grade sprayer, but you definitely want to spray this finish. Places like The Home Depot have a rental department where you can rent a sprayer but honestly, you can just buy one for the same price you’ll pay in rental fees. I used the Graco Magnum X5 sprayer with the 311 Tip (sold separately), but here are a couple of other cost-effective alternatives that work really well: Graco Truecoat 360 paint sprayer and HomeRight Super Finish Max sprayer. Using a sprayer will make your job so much easier and give you the results you want. 

The star of the show is the paint color but most importantly the paint brand and type. I’m using Benjamin Moore Advance Paint in the satin finish. This paint is a waterborne alkyd paint that acts like oil-based paint. The key component to this paint is that it self levels which is the reason why you have to wait 16 hours between coats. The extended open dry time gives the paint time to settle and level out, giving you that factory smooth finish in the end. It does dry to touch in about 3 hours, but it’s best to allow your doors and frames to fully dry before touching them and painting a second or third coat.

My husband and I created a turntable out of wood to make it easier to spin the cabinet doors while painting. It’s so much better spinning the doors than walking around the table. We screwed down paint pyramids to the turntable so that the doors had a raised surface to sit on during painting.

The best technique for painting your doors is to first tack down the surface using tack cloth. This will be your last attempt to fully remove any dust from the surface. Start with the backside of the door first (do both coats) and then flip to the front side of the doors. I prefer to spray the doors laying horizontally versus hanging them to avoid runs (see Em’s Instagram for a demonstration). Once you’re finished, carefully slide your hands underneath the doors, and place the door in its designated drying area. As you will see below, I used cups to elevate the doors while drying. You can use paint pyramids but you will have to buy a lot. The cups were a great alternative. Then move on to the next. It took approximately an hour and a half to two hours to spray each coat. It may take you less time or more time. Don’t rush this part. Take your time to avoid making mistakes.

While the doors dried, I masked off the kitchen area with more plastic and sprayed the cabinet boxes. I’m so glad I did because the process took about 30 minutes to spray vs hours with brushing or rolling. Use whatever method is convenient for you. Repeat the paint process one more time with a second coat. The doors took 4 days to paint: The first two days were for the backside, one coat per day, and the last two days, for the front side, one coat per day. It is not necessary to sand between coats, however, if you see any small imperfections, used a 320 grit sanding block to smooth it out. Remember if you decide to sand, you have to use the vacuum to pick up the dust, and tack the door or frame with tack cloth before applying paint. 

Step 7: Reinstall Your Cabinet Doors

When using Benjamin Moore Advance Paint you want to be sure to leave the doors to dry for about 2-3 days before handling them. It takes 30 days for the paint to completely harden, so be gentle with your newly painted cabinets once reinstalled. Use gloves when reinstalling because who wants fingerprints on their newly painted doors??

Speaking of newly painted doors:)

I am so happy with how it turned out. Yes this may be a long process, but it’s doable and will save you a lot of money doing it yourself.

Let’s Talk Dollars And Cents

Let’s take a look at the cost breakdown and comparison. The total cost of paint supplies for the entire project came to about $700. And a big chunk of that amount went towards investing in an airless paint sprayer (about $350). In the Washington DC area, it costs about $3200 on average to have your cabinets professionally painted. That’s a savings of $2500 that can be saved or allocated to other things on your renovation budget. Now, I did opt to get my cabinet doors refaced and primed which cost a little over $2000. The cost to get brand new cabinets on the lower end is $10,000. Refacing my cabinets, and painting them myself saved me $7,300. To add an even more custom look to my cabinetry, I hired a subcontractor to add double crown molding to my bulkheads to make it appear as if my cabinets go all the way to the ceiling, trim to my side panels and build out a shelf for a microwave in my peninsula. The cost of labor and materials came to $1000. But I still saved a ton of money. Doing things yourself may cost you time, but the savings in money can allow you to bring more custom elements to your kitchen.

I hope this post gives you the knowledge and confidence to do this yourself. Painting your cabinets can really transform your kitchen in a major way. As always if you have questions, you can ask them in the comments section, DM me on Instagram or email me. I’m always happy to answer and help. Now I’m going to wait a few more days before installing my unlacquered brass hardware from Rejuvenation. It’s the jewelry to the cabinets. My next post will be the kitchen reveal, so stay tuned for that!

0 0 vote
Article Rating

WANT MORE OF WHERE THAT CAME FROM?

Never miss a single post and get a little something extra on Saturdays.

81 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Rusty
2 months ago

Now THIS is DIY magic!!!😃

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Rusty

Thank you! I’m so happy with the results!

Brigitte
2 months ago

Wow! What a great job!👏👏👏 The cabinets look AMAZING! Can’t wait for the full reveal🙂

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Brigitte

Thank you!! The brighter paint color really transformed the kitchen. We’re almost to the finish line

Christina
2 months ago

This looks incredible but just not something my husband and I would have the bandwidth to do with young kids. But if you have the time (and patience) the money saved is awesome.

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Christina

I totally understand that. I couldn’t imagine doing this with little kiddies running around. It did take a lot of time and patience. The cabinet door company I used, Nieu Cabinet Doors, can paint them for you and deliver them, and all you’re responsible for is painting the boxes. That’s an option if you consider a project like this for your home.

Holly
2 months ago
Reply to  Christina

Yup we needed the kids out of the house to do this! My husband and I just ordered already painted cabinet doors (with boring and hinge in place) and painted the boxes ourselves, which if your doors overlay hardly will show at all. They just needed a light sanding and we painted with a roller (no sprayer). Then all we had to do was install the doors. We have a big kitchen so sanding took 4 hours, painting took about 6 hours, install took about 2 hours. We were so happy with how they turned out that we are doing it again for the bathroom.

Also, Semi-handmade and Barker door offer custom sized painted doors.

Lindsay
2 months ago
Reply to  Holly

Where did you order your painted doors from?

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Lindsay

You can order painted doors from Nieu Cabinet Doors. I opted to only get my doors primed (since I knew I wanted to do a tutorial) otherwise I would of had them painted before delivery.

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Holly

Thats awesome Holly! Yep…you hardly see the paint job on the boxes if the cabinet doors fully overlay it. Which paint brand did you use for your cabinet boxes? Semi-handmade is great! I believe the only work for Ikea cabinet boxes though. Thanks for sharing your process with us!

Holly
2 months ago
Reply to  Rashida

We just use behr satin enamel paint for the cabinet boxes. We used primer and a couple coats and sanded in between. Semi-handmade systems technically only work for IKEA, but they do have plain custom sized doors you can order a la carte, just have to measure very carefully. You have to drill the hinge boring into the cabinet as they don’t do that at Semi-handmade, but you can buy a hinge drill template for $20 to diy. We also had to color match the base box paint color to their cabinet color at the hardware store.

I’m so glad more companies are offering painted cabinet door options, thanks for sharing!

Kara
2 months ago

Ooh, that last close-up really shows that lovely bevel. Looking forward to the final reveal of all this hard work!

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Kara

The Beveled edge really elevated the cabinet look. Plus much easier to clean 😅

Jessie
2 months ago

What a transformation! I’m curious why you chose to paint the cabinet doors yourself. Was that a big cost savings? Also, depending on your wood, some people may need to use a shellac based primer (like BIN) to prevent tannin bleed. I learned that the hard way. One other tip is to use paint filters when you’re spraying. Tiny globs can really cause problems. I find that a light sanding between coats is worth the hassle. Love Advance paint! Can’t wait to see the final reveal!

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Jessie

Hi Jessie! Thank you. I painted my doors myself to show you all how to do it, otherwise I would have had Nieu Cabinet Doors paint it for me. And yes, I suggest to research the primer that works best with your wood species. Thanks for all your added tips!

R
2 months ago

Hi Rashida, thanks for this post! It contains so much useful information. I’m not too knowlegable about cabinet painting and wondering why you recommend to use oil based or similar paint? Also wondering how the self leveling paint works on vertical surfaces like the cabinet frames. Does it run down to the bottom? Thanks!!

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  R

Hi R! Thanks for stopping by! I used an oil based primer because my cabinets are wood. The oil based primer seals the wood and helps the paint that will go on top of cover the surface better. Otherwise the wood would literally soak up all the paint and you would have to do several coats just to hide the wood grain. The self leveling works great on a vertical surface. You want to make sure to do light coats or else it would run down due to gravity. I learned that the hard way lol.

Paul
2 months ago

I can’t wait to try this!

emily jane
2 months ago

Wow, wow, WOW! I admire your vision and skill but especially your patience and am VERY much looking forward to your kitchen reveal post. Thanks for sharing : )

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  emily jane

Thanks so much for stopping by! Kitchen reveal coming soon!

Sarah
2 months ago

This is one of the best tutorials I’ve seen! So many try to skip the sanding step, and it’s crucial if you actually want the paint to stick and not repeat all your hard work in a few years. I painted my kitchen last summer using the Graco airless sprayer that you recommended, and it turned out great. And it was actually kind of fun! Much less tedious than rolling and brushing, even with all the extra work to cover everything with plastic. Great job on your kitchen, and on the tutorial!

Cici Haus
2 months ago
Reply to  Sarah

Sanding and waiting are the worst, most important steps!

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Cici Haus

You said it perfectly!

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Sarah

Thanks Sarah! Definitely can’t skip sanding. Its long and tedious…but very necessary. Graco sprayer is a fun tool to use. It was a learning curve in the beginning with all the setting up steps but quickly got the hang of it. How’s your kitchen holding up? and what paint brand did you use?

Julie
2 months ago

get out OF TOWN!!!! THIS IS BEYOND. I could never in a million years do this and you are amazing to have knocked it out of the park. WOW.

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Julie

Thanks so much Julie!

Rebecca
2 months ago

Excellent, all of it! Adding crown to the bulkheads…genius. 👏🏻

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Rebecca

Thanks Rebecca! I wanted to make it feel like the cabinets go up to the ceiling so we hired someone to add double crown moulding and it really made the bulkheads and cabinets join together as one!

2 months ago

This is so helpful! It’s the most thorough description of how to paint kitchen cabinets PROPERLY that I have ever read, and I read a lot of interior design DIY how-tos! Thank you, Rashida. Also I love the beveled detail on the cabinet fronts. I have regular shaker fronts in my rental kitchen and it’s a b*tch to clean dust and grime out of those pesky corners on the fronts–I bet that beveled edge will make your cabinets easier to clean as well as more elegant!

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Merry

Wow! Thanks so much Merry! I really wanted this post to be the “Tell All” of cabinet painting. Im so happy you found it useful. And the beveled detail was something I wanted just for design but never considered how much easier it will be to clean. Thanks for bringing that to my attention!

Erin W
2 months ago

This looks amazing! I’ve been researching cabinet painting in preparation for a project for many months and this is super helpful!

I’ve been wondering about the paint turn table. Can you share how you made that?

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Erin W

Hi Erin! I’m so glad you found it helpful. I actually recorded a video on how I made it. I will post it on instagram. Are you on there?

Lindsay
2 months ago

Wow what a great post!! Thank you so much for sharing your expertise, Rashida. I have brand new cabinets in my kitchen and the layout is great (lucky me!), but I sure would love for them to be a bit more colorful. This just might give me the confidence to tackle this project!!

Annabelle
2 months ago

Amazing. I am gearing up to do this project soon and having all the materials in a list is so handy. Can we get a source for your amazing floor??

oh man. this is just gorgeous. what a change!

Rashida
2 months ago

Thanks so much! Kitchen reveal coming soon!

Lane
2 months ago

This couldn’t have come at the better time. Thanks for the resources and tips. We’ll definitively use them.

Deborah
2 months ago

Do these tips work for repainting melamine Shaker cabinets?

A.B.
2 months ago

Really amazing job. Best DIY painting tutorial I’ve seen.

Terra
2 months ago

Hell yes, Rashida! Your DIY skills are rivalled only by your writing. The amount of detail and specificity you offer is perfect, plus it doesn’t take away from addressing the high-level stuff in an easy-to-understand way! So appreciated. 🙂

Lucy
2 months ago

I could never pull this off, but good on you for doing it yourself! Your kitchen looks fantastic, and this is a great tutorial.

Juanita
2 months ago

Rashida, this is hard work that has totally paid off!!🌸 Your and your husband’s attention to detail in prepping the doors for painting, and then painting…. that has made all the difference. My hat is off to you!! 🌸 Than k you for sharing the resource about Nieu Custom doors. How did they help you measure what size the new door would be, as you went from partial overlay to full overlay? Was it tricky to measure it?

Kj
2 months ago

Great job, Rashida. I know you replaced your existing granite, but Jennifer posted recently how she transformed her kitchen by painting her brown granite to look like marble, if anyone is interested. https://www.jenniferlauraliving.com/post/painting-our-countertops-to-look-like-marble-with-a-giani-diy-paint-kit

Andrea
2 months ago

Rashida this is the BEST! Thank you very much. Everyone should bookmark this, because sometime in our lives, someone is going to ask, “Wonder if I can paint these cabinets myself?” and here is the answer.

Elaine
2 months ago

What a stellar job! And that lil’ peek of new slate floor tiles and marble (or is it quartz, dunno but it’s delicious!) counter-top…looks dreamy 😍.

Roberta Davis
2 months ago

Thanks for all the practical tips on prepping and everything! I don’t think I’m ambitious enough to do it. But my cabinets could use a paint refinish. Several neighbors have been updating their kitchens and painting their wood cabinets. Maybe…

2 months ago

i like this

Alix
2 months ago

I sure like the bird wall sculpture I see in one of the “Door Drying” photos…can you tell us more about it?

Michelle
2 months ago

What a transformation- thank you for making this process seem more approachable.
So inspired by the result!

Deborah
2 months ago

This is super helpful information as we are just getting ready to actually tackle the kitchen–which will be a complete replacement of the cabinets. In our case, and your post almost convinces me we might be crazy for this, we are looking to order unfinished cabinets so we can 1) paint the color we want and 2) the maybe crazy part–have a finish that looks hand painted, brush strokes and all. Our house is a vintage circa 1930 Cape Cod style cottage and something about the factory finish just seems a little too new? I am all for sealing them well for durability–but is this a bad plan? Willing to take any feedback/slash horror stories/lessons learned….

Annabelle
2 months ago
Reply to  Deborah

We did this in our current place and it’s totally fine. Maybe not as long lasting but also not difficult to touch up. I didn’t want that smooth finish either – to each their own 🙂

Patti
2 months ago

What a fabulous result but no way on earth I would EVER take this on! Kudos to you!

Anne Davis
2 months ago

I have a tiny kitchen in a Manhattan studio apt. (rental). There’s no way I could do this project with the limited space. Wouldn’t IKEA cabinets be more cost effective in this case?

KS
2 months ago

So much RESPECT! Looks amazing.

Amy
2 months ago

This is the most informative post I’ve ever seen on painting cabinets. Thank you! Your kitchen looks fantastic and I can’t wait to see it all finished!

arti
2 months ago

This is INSANELY GOOD. Thank you for such a thorough post. It gives me confidence to tackle my own project this summer.

Lilli
2 months ago

This is great! Especially loved that you shared the costs and the time it took all in. Great job!

Cc
2 months ago

Looks great! A lot of steps. I always thought I had to sand and prime, too. Check out Heirloom paints for a much easier process, if they have a color you like.

lisa
2 months ago

Thank you! This came at a perfect time, as I am planning to paint my cherry wet bar cabinets in the basement for my own MOTO…It is a small enough area that I think I might be able to manage it on my own, armed with your knowledge and expertise (and a paint sprayer 😉)!

LisaLove
2 months ago

Thank you so much for this amazing post! I’ve done a lot of interior and exterior house painting with brushes and rollers, but I’ve been ready to up my game for a while and your DIY guidance is just what I need! I so appreciate you sharing this with us-very well thought out and explained!

Meredith
2 months ago

This is WILDLY impressive. I despair of ever being this thorough and precise, but man does the finished product show the work you put in! Brava!

Cindy
2 months ago

This is spectacular!! You’ve inspired me. Can’t wait for the full reveal. Looks super chic.

sarah
2 months ago

Wow! Fantastic end result and fantastic tutorial.

Sarah
2 months ago

You are amazing! So focused and such a nice legit DIY!

Lynn
2 months ago

Definitely bookmarking this for future reference. So in-depth and super useful. Thank you thank you!!!

Jacqueline
2 months ago

Thank you, this is so helpful! Any tips on how to best use the paint sprayer?

Susanna
2 months ago

As someone shopping for new homes, I’ve seen too many subpar DIY cabinet paint and refacing jobs that lead me to believe that with rare exceptions (you apparently being one of them), this work is best left to pros.

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Susanna

Hi Susanna, I totally agree that you should leave it to the pros if you plan on cutting corners or you don’t want to be patient with the process. Happy House hunting!

SP
2 months ago

Awesome awesome! I painted our cabinets in our 1969s cape cod home 7 years ago and they are due for a refresh. I’m loving your turntable invention! Can you let me know at what point during the process did you replace the floor and the countertops? Thanks!!!

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  SP

Hi there! We replaced the floors first. Then painted the cabinets. Then had countertops installed. I probably would have done countertops before cabinets, only because when they installed it, they chipped one of my cabinet doors. I probably should have removed my doors prior to them installing. I hope this helps.

Shannon
2 months ago

THIS IS AMAZING! This is literally exactly what I needed today. I just bought a house this week and the first project I want to do is paint the kitchen. Thank you so much for the care and detail that went into this post!

Kelly
2 months ago

Can you tell us more about how to get that “to the ceiling” look with the cabinets?

Rashida
2 months ago
Reply to  Kelly

Hi Kelly! It was quite simple. I hired a finisher contractor or contractor that does moulding/carpentry to add double crown moulding to the bulkheads. Pretty much baseboards moulding is at the bottom underneath the crown, so that it’s thick enough to cover the majority of the bulkhead. Then we added a little simple cabinet moulding right between where the bulkhead and cabinets meet. If you go to my instagram page you’ll see a saved story highlight that explains it all.

Joyce
2 months ago

I have read a number of articles on painting kitchen cabinets. Yours was the best ever and the photos helped a lot. I won’t be diy’ing my cabinets but I want to congratulate on the great job you did.

Go To Top