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Target Haul: All The Clothes Mallory Brought For My Shoot This Week – Affordable Fall Clothes

It’s Target shoot week! In a perfect world I go to Target myself to shop and pull together the curated 1-3 outfits that I would wear for our different shoots. However, there was a big accident on the 210 freeway so I had to take the back way up the mountain, missing my favorite Pasadena Target that I had planned to hit. So Mal rescued me and brought up what she thought I’d love. So today I’m going to show you a quick and dirty Target haul. And it’s pretty darn cute stuff.

Dress | Jacket | Boots | Bandana

When I saw that dress I thought it was cute but boring, but then I put it on and it’s REALLY GOOD. The sleeves have a lot of cute volume and the skirt is lined! You know I don’t have the patience for a slip, so this is GREAT for me. I paired it with their duck boots, their Levi’s collab sherpa coat, some wool socks, and a bandana (as per my fall styling educational styling hack post).

Blouse | Jeans | Boots

Here we go with the equestrian vibe again. These were the boots I’ve told you about a couple times but they are so cute and affordable (and so comfortable with memory foam interior soles). The jeans are mine from years ago but these are similar. And that blouse has cute ruffles that aren’t TOO big.

Sweater | Blouse | Jeans | Boots

I actually think this is the second most successful outfit here (the first being the dress with the Levi’s sherpa jacket). Here we have the sweater that Caitlin linked up a while ago that I hadn’t tried but really liked!! It has a good shape – kinda a boyish crew-style that is a good medium length. Of course, Mal even got me a little Victorian blouse for underneath so the collar and sleeves could pop a bit. We were both VERY impressed with those boots – the soles are good and look super expensive.

Jumpsuit | Duck Boots | Boots

Here we have the Sandy Liang jumpsuit that I had wondered about but hadn’t tried. For me, it was hard to style with boots, but I’m VERY picky about jumpsuits. The cut is too important and it can’t hug in the wrong places, and when it’s good it’s just so good (like my old The Great jumpsuit or my new sweatshirt jumpsuit from Alex Mill). I think I should have just worn it with a cuff at the hem and sneakers or Vans, but the crotch is pretty long. Ultimately I prefer a darker or patterned jumpsuit, the cream makes me nervous and I didn’t feel that comfortable. But both boots are awesome. And fun fact, over the weekend I went into Frances May in Portland and spotted this Sandy Liang fleece which was excellent and was VERY BUMMED that they didn’t have it in my size, and then I realized it was $625 but boy was it good. Like really good. Fine, it’s here.

Denim Skirt | Sweater (no longer available) | Boots

I’m so annoyed that this sweater is no longer available (we bought it on Thursday in-store so head to your local Target). It’s so cute and you bet I kept it – a cozy structured ruffle. The skirt is cute too, with an easy fit and a sweet little paper bag ruffle at the top (it’s Who What Wear). Same boots as above, y’all.

Pullover Sweater | Button Up | Jeans | Boots

This was an experiment. I was trying the chambray collar under the 1/4 zip trend that I’ve seen on the social media. Not sure I’m pulling it off there, which means I’m not. The sweater is so cute, though, I just think it’s a lot with the shirt underneath and that combo needs to be under a thicker sweatshirt, not a sweet sweater, but quite literally what do I know.

And that’s what I tried on and mostly really liked from Mal’s Target haul for me. I’ve decided that affordable fashion is mostly about a really good cut, which is the hardest thing to achieve (colors and patterns are easier).

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Elizabeth Drake
27 days ago

I’d like to gently raise the issue of sustainability in the context of this post. The fashion industry is hugely problematic in terms of social and environmental impact, and one of the biggest ways we can help is by just not buying stuff we don’t need. I’m human and understand the draw to buy new outfits at the beginning of the season, but we need to shift away from this mindset. Did you need any of these things? Did something happen to all of the fall clothes you bought last year? Probably not, in which case this post is irresponsible. I’d really like to see people with such a big influence paying more attention to these issues.

Karen
27 days ago

I whole-heartedly agree with you on this POV, but this blog and Emily’s “influencer status” only exist because she generates income. Showing pictures of her wearing outfits from years past (that would most likely not be available for purchase) isn’t going to do much for her bottom line. That being said, I think there is an opportunity to add a sentence of two about considering whether or not one “needs something” and to encourage one to be mindful when making new purchases. But she didn’t include that message here, I bet this was a quick and fun post for her, and we should remember that she does bring in environmental consideration from time to time (definitely on recent farm reno posts). There are lots of other blogs that focus on eco-friendliness/reducing consumerism, some a lot more than others, and this blog just isn’t one of those. And I think it gets tricky when we start imposing our expectations on Emily and her content, because this is her platform. I do appreciate that us readers have this comment section to add our thoughts/comments, where most often Emily and crew reply thoughtfully to feedback and take it to heart.

Susan
27 days ago

I agree. Fast fashion is a huge problem for so many reasons. So is changing up house decor by buying new things every season. I AM interested in learning how to beautify my living spaces. I know social media content creators need to be paid for their work. Just wish there was more of an active conversation about the impact of choices. Maybe Emily’s blog isn’t the platform for that conversation? Chris Loves Julia never talks about this either, nor does Yellow Brick Home or some of the other home and lifestyle blogs. But when they have so many followers they could influence for good in that way, I surely wish they would.

Kerri
27 days ago
Reply to  Susan

I know Kim at Yellow Brick Home has made very explicit comments about not being into fast fashion, and buying clothing for quality and longevity. It has endeared her to me even more! And I find them fairly refreshing in their approach to home decor – things seem to turn over far less frequently in their own home, and they seem to be able to keep their blog going by working on other spaces instead of constantly reinventing a single location.

And I think it’s important to keep in mind that some people’s definition of “fast fashion” could be someone else’s high-end or affordable option and it is what it is.

Kelly
27 days ago

This level of entitlement drives me nuts because unlike a lot of you, I don’t have the budget to spend hundreds on a wear-forever sweater or one-and-done boots. Just because something is from Target doesn’t mean I’m going to throw it in a landfill next week. For a lot of us, THIS *is* our version of sustainable. I’ve bought lots of pieces from the blog in the past and because I have a limited budget, I appreciate hearing honest reviews on how things look and feel so I can make the choices that are wisest for me and my budget.
It’s great that you seem to have everything you need, but some of us are doing our best with tinier purses. Please don’t assume that we’re all suckers for “fast fashion” and “consumerism” – this is just a relatable post with some wear-forever pieces for those of us who don’t have the same budgets that the bulk of this site’s readers seem to have.

Deepa
27 days ago
Reply to  Kelly

This. There is so much entitlement in the “sustainable fashion” movement. Most people in this country can’t afford three figures for one piece of clothing or one pair of shoes. That doesn’t mean we wear our stuff once or twice and then dump it, just because it didn’t cost and arm and a leg. I, for one, really appreciate the accessible price points in this post. Thank you EHD!

Carrie
27 days ago
Reply to  Deepa

I stopped buying fast fashion when I realized I could buy a used Armani suit for the same cost as a new one from Old Navy.

Rose
27 days ago
Reply to  Carrie

Doesn’t your arm get tired patting yourself on the back?

Catherine Burbank
26 days ago
Reply to  Rose

Smarm is unnecessary. Goodwill, Target, ON, Nordstrom, it’s all good. Buy what you need when you need, what you can afford, and pass on what you’ve outgrown in size or style, so others will benefit. Some of my most favorite and long lasting clothes are from Salvation Army and Old Navy. Sometimes we need a little “new” in our lives. (or new used!) Thanks to Emily & co. for encouraging us to reimagine our old faithfuls in a new way.

Elizabeth
27 days ago
Reply to  Kelly

I agree that this is such an important point! Sustainable/ethical fashion brands are not accessible for most people, which I absolutely recognize. I’m actually wearing something from Target now! My point isn’t that everyone should buy more expensive clothes, but to think critically about whether you need to buy anything at all, which seems to be missing from this dialogue. I think as consumers have a tendency to get caught up in trends, new seasonal items, etc. and then end up purchasing unnecessary items, which is a problematic part of our consumerist culture that’s driving environmental degradation.

Carrie
27 days ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

Yes, and if you need something, buy secondhand!

Rose
27 days ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

Someone please DEFUND the SUSTAINABLE POLICE!!!

Rusty
26 days ago
Reply to  Rose

Maybe … wake up?

Rusty
26 days ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

So well said, Elizabeth.

Ashleigh
27 days ago
Reply to  Kelly

Excellent point and well said.

Lane
27 days ago

I’m not sure if it is or isn’t responsible. But I’m leaning toward this being NOT irresponsible.. Afterall, Emily has millions followers and I bet some of their clothes might be worn out or ill fitting at the moment. As such, they might be shopping for new things. I have a different style and body shape, so I don’t look read composition of these clothes. So again I can’t comment about the global impact. I did notice however three other popular influencers selling polyester rugs and/or advertising polyester clothes in the last 12 months. That puts me off. But I have no problem with bringing attention to quality items at various price points. I appreciate when others narrow down or style things. It saves me time provided I see myself in these clothes.

Rusty
26 days ago

I live by a personal creed: You don’t have a right to complain about something, unless you’re prepared to DO something about it. If you walk your talk and DO something about it and the problem persists; then you DO have a right to complain about it. There is no Planet B 🌏 That said, Emily’s personal choices and behaviours have overtly and (IF you’ve been paying attention) DRAMATICALLY changed for the better over recent years. She IS obviously trying and it’s a difficult tightrope to walk, running a successful business in a world whirring with retail, sponsorships, etc. Choosing sponsorships carefully and mindfully can make s big difference, but I understand why it’s a conundrum. An issue that’s very clear from some commenters, is that some people may be so individualistic, that any constructive criticism is viewed as a personal attack, on them, the individual, not Emily; when it is not about them at all. Perhaps people may get their proverbial knickers in a knot and attack those that are pointing out mindless consumerism, because they feel a spotlight on their own behaviour? Whether we like it or not, change is up to ALL of us, EVERY day, in… Read more »

Kj
27 days ago

Wait, I thought you lived in Portland now. Or you still split time between the mountain house and the farmhouse?

Nancy S
27 days ago

Thank you – just bought those Target short boots in brown 😎

27 days ago

I really like the partial zip sweater on you–the puffed sleeves give it a nice, feminine look. I’m pretty sure I need the Madewell bandana you linked!

patty
27 days ago

I think Jerry Seinfeld is running the blouse department at Target.

LM
27 days ago
Reply to  patty

hahahaha

deb
27 days ago
Reply to  patty

My first thought too!

Jamie
27 days ago

This is the most LA start of a blog post ever (and I love it). As I read “There was a big accident on the 210 freeway” I thought, yep, been there. “So I had to take the back way up the mountain”, ooh, what’s the back way you go? Did you take side streets? (Is it weird if I ask in the comments what her route is?). “Missing my favorite Pasadena Target”, I think I know which one you’re thinking of and, agree, it’s a great Target.
I don’t live in LA anymore, and this type of LA-insider talk (of course you must include specific traffic detail that explains your delay, or even just how your day is going) is one of the things that I miss the most. Thank you for including it in the post, it made my day!

Cheryl
27 days ago
Reply to  Jamie

Literally an episode of The Californians on SNL. 😂

Kim
27 days ago

This is the conundrum Emily has backed herself into. She preaches sustainability, but everything she writes about on the blog is irresponsible consumerism. Fast fashion, plastic holiday decor items, plastic turf lined backyard, thousands of dollars of wallpaper in a rental and don’t even get me started on the farm house and the $30,000. Induction range from Europe, she is in no way practicing sustainability!

I realize that this is how she makes money, but she should not be preaching sustainability while manically shopping and linking a bunch of crap that will end up the landfill.

Deepa
27 days ago
Reply to  Kim

I’ve been reading EHD for years, and it has never struck me as a niche sustainable design blog — just a general design blog. And being a design blog, even though there are sometimes posts about antiquing / used flea market finds, etc., a site like this also bound to feature newer design / fashion trends, as well as where you can purchase items to participate in these trends. If you don’t want to participate in needless consumerism, (which is a perspective I’m not unsympathetic to), this is the wrong site, and the wrong hobby, for that matter, for you. Which is all to say, I think EHD is being unfairly crucified in some of these comments.

Ellen
27 days ago
Reply to  Kim

how is her $30,000 range is going to end up in a landfill?
wallpaper in a rental is going to end up in a landfill??
can you see the future?

MKP
26 days ago
Reply to  Kim

I read Emily sharing her choices sort of like I would hear a friend. With a friend, I can understand how they may totally splurge on some things even if they value saving. Or if they make a lot of efforts to reduce waste and do good things for the planet, but also choose to fly to Europe for vacation because it’s what their heart longs for and budget allows. I’m short, I don’t expect a friend to be perfect or even perfectly consistent 24/7. I believe Emily is taking the planet into account in many of her decisions at the farmhouse. I believe this is sincere and not just talking out of both sides of her mouth. I get that she has a big platform and could really have a positive influence with 100% sustainability focus, but that’s just not this blog. And I actually have learned some things about protecting the environment from this blog (like using induction for cooking instead of natural gas), so she is getting some good messages across. I come here for inspiration and I receive it. I don’t need EHD to be all things to me or to be perfect. I love and… Read more »

Shay
27 days ago

Oh my gosh, she can’t win! If she links to a $200 sweater people call her entitled and “out of touch” and complain that they can’t spend that much (forget using it as an idea … didn’t you ever pick up a Vogue and enjoy the pictures and inspiration even if you can’t spend $500 on a white T?) And when she links to Target stuff she’s accused of being unsustainable and … “out of touch” Well. She’s not telling you to buy it, she’s showing ideas. You’re grown-ups, you make up your own dang mind about when and what to buy with your own money. Personally, I am not much of a consumer/shopper (though I do still need things sometimes), and am very much a minimalist and in favor of sustainability. I’m just so sick of everyone thinking every thing needs to be exactly applicable to them … and feeling free to complain if it doesn’t. Perhaps that actually is the biggest indicator of entitlement.

27 days ago
Reply to  Shay

Shay, Amen.

Betsy
27 days ago
Reply to  Shay

This comment needs a like button!

Rose
27 days ago
Reply to  Shay

1000% this! The solution is to eliminate the comments entirely. People can’t seem to stop themselves from jumping up on a soap box to sing their own praises, and lecture other people. They are so so TIRESOME.
P.S. I buy things from Target that last me for YEARS. The Sustainable Police need to shut up.

Keely
24 days ago
Reply to  Rose

Eliminating comments entirely?!? Oh my GOD! Is there anywhere left on earth where I can freely speak my mind? Must it all be coded? Or proper? Or censored so it’s not removed or disappeared or – HEY!! Now let’s just not give you the option to speak at ALL?

I think you may change your mind about that idea someday!!!

Whether it’s about fashion or something more serious, I want a damn voice, and most people I know do too. I’m tired of it being removed, thank you very much.

Next opinion on Emily and fast fashion, please. I like to listen to ALL sides.

Marian Schembari
27 days ago
Reply to  Shay

Oh my god Shay yessss….. THIS. EXACTLY. Sing it from the rooftops!

Deirdre
27 days ago
Reply to  Shay

Amen Shay! I rarely comment but today is absurd! We all need to be concerned about our environment, sustainability and waste. Some of the commentary today sounds more like envy than concern. Perhaps taking it down a notch or even not commenting at all would be a good idea.

L
26 days ago
Reply to  Shay

Let’s not pretend that there isn’t a monthly post entitled “What You Bought Last Month”. I mean, of course, we’re all grown ups and decide where our money goes but EHD content has leaned heavily into consumerism…which will always lead back to questions of sustainability, responsibility and, in turn, accountability from the very audience they’re trying to sell it to. Seeing how this post managed to advertise Target fashion AND a $625 fleece, I’d say the issue often has less to do with the price point and more to do with the near constant discrepancy between intent vs. content.

Betsy
27 days ago

I don’t think Emily is trying to get people to run out and buy 1 of everything shown. I think she is simply showing some fun, new, options in clothing and boots. If I needed a new pair of boots, then she has shown me some options that are cute. Need a new top, there you go. She clearly stated that some of the clothing she already owns. And that she wasn’t keeping all of it, just showing the look. Some people are so uptight. I don’t need to buy anything right now. But I still enjoyed looking at what she modeled. I have a pair of similar short leather boots just like the pair modeled. My Frye riding boots, will still work as a tall boot after probably having them 6-7 years. I actually own the bandana shown, and other cute Madewell bandanas. I don’t think this post is going to send anyone out to needlessly buy stuff, because it was on the blog. Rant over!

J
27 days ago
Reply to  Betsy

TOTALLY agree! People have a mind of their own and what choices they make is not Emily’s responsibility. I don’t see the harm in sharing these posts and I think people need to get off their high horse. Sure fast fashion is partially driven by consumers, but ultimately the responsibility lies with the consumer. I used to purchase clothes from F21 when I was in high school because that was all I could afford and many of them survived all my teenage years because I knew how to take care of the things I own. If people can’t make responsible choices then that’s on them and not Emily.
I’ve really grown to hate browsing the comments in this blog because people jump at EVERY LITTLE opportunity to crucify Emily and her team. She can’t ever win here. I’ve also seen commentors that have been borderline harassing her for years and I’m amazed she’s tolerated them for so long.

Betsy
27 days ago
Reply to  J

Amen! You need to read cupofjo.com, if you don’t already. She has the best comments section. Her readers are amazing.

debbiesomand@gmail.com
27 days ago

These clothes look cheap and do not flatter. Stick to basics that are well made and timeless. You will always have something to wear and you won’t be throwing out every season.

Christy
27 days ago

Thanks for sharing this v cute out fits! My company just announced we’ll be returning part time to the office in January after working from home since March 2020, so it’s fun to start thinking about some fun, casual office outfits again.

Hillary
26 days ago

The frustration isn’t that Emily has bought some “cheap” clothes from Target (which are not cheap for everyone), or that she posts fashion round-ups. It’s that she spends a lot of time claiming she is very interested in sustainability, but then publishes about a post a week that is simply a buy-more-shit type thing, often tied to her Target sponsorship. If you’re posting that she “has a right” to do this, well of course she does. She can live and blog and decorate however she chooses. But defending it as something she “has to do to make a living” is ludicrous. What that really means is that it’s *easier* for her to accept the Target money and promote its plastic products made in CO2-spouting factories. Many of her longtime readers seem to be growing irritated that EHD (the whole company) talks out of both sides of its mouth when it comes to sustainable practices, and then does not address it when their comments are filled with valid points. (Are you guys even listening?) As long as she has the comments open, people are free to point out that they don’t appreciate this tactic and that they wish that, for the… Read more »

LouAnn
25 days ago
Reply to  Hillary

What’s ludicrous is people like you complaining about free content. As if all of the energy being used for you to click away on free content doesn’t have an environmental cost. Height of hypocrisy.

Leslie
26 days ago

I found this post useful because I didn’t like anything in it (except maybe the short black boots. But I doubt they have enough support for me). So I got to see what Target is offering and thought, nah.

anon
26 days ago

I do appreciate that you have sponsors.

And aware that they (sponsors) “might acually be paying attention” to the reactions towards your blog post… the “fashion” posts on this blog are not my favorites because I have fashion blogs that I follow that are relevant to *me*. In this case pretty much all of the featured fashion content from Target is useless to me because I am not the plus/minus 1 standard deviation of the typical American woman they are “targeting”. Target does not carry “tall sizes” (e.g. inseams of 34 inches plus or long sleeves for long sleeve tops), they do not carry larger sizes for women’s shoes such as size 10.5, 11.5, 12, 12.5, etc. They do not carry bras in sizes DDD, G, or H, etc. From what they sell it seems they are only interested in the lowest common denominator. That’s too bad. 🙁

Susan
26 days ago

I find these fashion posts fun to read and also helpful to get ideas on how to style things in my closet. I don’t feel any pressure to buy anything new. Give Emily a break.

CS Kyle
26 days ago

Just jumping in to say that the Rachel Comey/Target collab is great— I grabbed a snazzy pair of off-white, cropped, large-cuffed trousers and they are my new favorites.

Juanita
26 days ago

Just thinking out loud here (I do not know anyone at EHD): Emily and her team’s work has a “front of the house”— the posts and photos that face the world… and a “back of the house” where they talk about posts, organize work, manage who does what, and, no doubt, go over in aching detail what reader comments say/ and the number, and evaluate sponsorships EHD agrees to. Everything I have read over the years on this site shows this is a thoughtfully run business, by an amazingly patient and thoughtful person. (Notice the word perfect is left out of that sentence… are any of us “perfect” in private life or our public persona?). This thoughtfulness no doubt extends back to the meetings that EHD have with Target/ or other sponsors… and can truly be used to influence a big box store. I can just hear in my head EHD saying, “you know, on the Target posts we had X number of responses, and about X% of that number really wished Target had more sustainable fashion options at the price point Target is known for.” You never know what a small group of thoughtful, responsible people are doing “at… Read more »

26 days ago

Dear all those who consume FREE content put out by the conscious, hardworking, gracious EHD team…and who spend your time complaining about it…and who are so epically entitled as to think every post on the internet has to resonate with and be about YOU: How about starting your own blog? Or even writing daily on Medium (like I do here: https://dana-leigh-lyons.medium.com/). It’s free, and you can share whatever message you wish. How about assuming kindness and projecting THAT onto others rather than your toxic, contagious complaining, judgement and hate. How about not holding Emily and team responsible for your choices and the choices of others? We are all adults here. Case in point: I am a minimalist to the extreme. I live in a one-room cabin in the woods on a small island in PNW Canada and literally own less than 30 items of clothing (shoes included). I own one spoon, one fork, two knives, two bowls. I also chose to not have kids (think about the eco-friendly ramifications of that!). I read and enjoy Emily’s fashion posts and other posts every day, to RELAX. I do NOT suddenly feel the irresistible urge to go out and buy anything at all. I also don’t insist on… Read more »

Pat McRee
25 days ago

Dana, somebody here is going to ask why you need that second knife and bowl!

Gabi
25 days ago
Reply to  Pat McRee

As much as I agree with Dana’s comment above, yours, Pat, made me laugh out loud… 🙂 “Interesting” conversations going on here, followed by somebody from a different corner of the universe… Austria, to be more precise… Emily’s blog is very much appreciated and enjoyed over here, even though I’ve never ever entered a Target in my life…
Glad that there are readers out there who still have their sense of humour!!!!!!!

25 days ago
Reply to  Pat McRee

Pat, insert big crying smiley emoji here :):):). The world will never know…

L
25 days ago

Dana- good points and good for you! Way to embrace a lifestyle that is true to yourself. Pat- I agree with Gabi, your comment made me laugh out loud! I did want to mention the possibility that maybe all “opposing” comments aren’t always coming from toxic, entitled, sustainability fanatics. As a longtime supporter of EHD, I come here, like everyone else, for inspiration….and after more than a decade, a sense of community. I fully appreciate that this blog is a hardworking business and I have zero expectations that every post will fit my specific tastes/needs. However, it does feel like original design content has taken a backseat to consumerism- weekly round-ups, affiliate-link laden how-to’s and shopping guides have become the norm. (Even the rare “farmhouse” posts have become product link-ups, rather than real life updates.) Are those posts helpful to some? Absolutely! Do I have to read them, let alone shop from them? Of course not. To each his own. No one here is saying that Emily forced them to buy a pair of polyurethane boots against their will. But for transparency’s sake, let’s all not pretend that EHD isn’t pushing a product or a specific brand here…while also trying… Read more »

Chantal
25 days ago

Say no to Target (they have donated to the GOP who block voting rights. Regardless how you feel about politics, everyone should have a fair chance to vote safely)! And there is no excuse to promote fast fashion. Shop second hand and if you must buy new, try looking for handmade products on Etsy or learn to see them yourself. Disappointed in this post.

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