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Design

The Bathroom Floor Plans At River House And Why Each Layout Makes Sense

Over 2 years ago Annie Usher, the architect, designed the layout of the house, including the 4 1/2 bathrooms. Max weighed in first on the layout of each bathroom and I have to be honest that I don’t remember how involved I was, so I have to assume “not very” is the answer. I really really trust architects to put the plumbing where it should be to flow (literally) in the house, and while the bathrooms are certainly important they obviously get placed second in priority to some of the other rooms. So today you’ll see where Annie put them and how they are laid out, all differently including some insight or tips on why the vanities and toilets were put where and why that makes a difference.

We have two bathrooms on the 1st floor – the mudroom/downstairs guest full bath and the powder bath. Then upstairs we have…

The kids share a hall bath close to their rooms, there is a proper guest bath for the guest room, and of course, the primary bath – all on the second floor. I think the layout is FANTASTIC and Annie did such a great job.

Two years ago THIS MONTH, we flew down to LA to the Kohler showroom to look at all the fixtures in person. We were all actually there for different vacations (Katie went to a bachelorette, Hendos to Palm Springs for President’s Day weekend, and Max for a fabric partnership) so we set up a shoot because the LA showroom is EPIC.

So many of you will skim by this post, and I get that, but those of you who love knowing how other people like to lay out their bathrooms, hopefully, you’ll find this RIVETING. There is logic, flow (ahem), and style all considered.

The downstairs guest bath is right off the mudroom and may be where kids will run back to pee while swimming in the river (unless they make the more “natural” choice, of course). It didn’t need a shower but felt like a “when in Rome” situation and good to have should they have any crashers (like us) in the family room. It was a more “nice to have” shower, but it’s also very pretty 🙂

From Max: “I love using pony walls in bathrooms. It adds a sense of privacy and coziness to a shower, but since it’s waist-ish–high, there’s still a lot of openness and light throughout the room. And it’s nice to give a separation between a shower and a toilet whenever possible. The pony wall in here was another way to show off the awesome tile, since we tiled both sides of it. Another tip is that the shower valve is directly across from the opening to the shower. Instead of under the shower head (where it would typically go). I do this a lot in guest bathrooms, so friends and family who are using this shower can turn it on and futz with the temperature without getting soaked. It also creates an interesting visual, with the faucet trim being such a focal point. There’s another wall ledge in here instead of a shower niche.”

Ya’ll, the powder bath is turning out SO CUTE and rather big. I have the same thoughts as Max re the toilet (aka, not in front of the door). No one wants to look at a toilet.

From Max: “Whenever possible, I try to put powder room sinks and vanities directly across from the door to the room. That way, you and your guests get the nicest view when walking into the room. And if the door is left open, people are looking at a cool vanity instead of a toilet. Since we used a wall-mounted sink and there’s no countertop space, we added a ledge above it to give a spot for soap, etc. This meant we had to bump that wall out a few inches and lose some floor space, but we had the room to do so.”

From Max: “I can’t remember whose idea this was (probably Annie’s!), but originally we had the vanities on the opposite wall under the windows. The layout in this room wasn’t clicking until the vanities were moved across the way. Double vanities are really charming looking. You lose a little storage space compared to one long vanity with double sinks, but it’s worth it in a space like this.”

I think this double vanity situation will be so great for their boy/girl kids. Listen, kids sharing a vanity is not the worst and surely it’s good for them, but my kids do, in fact, fight a lot over space and so having their own just deliniates the space and mitigates the arguments.

I had to force a bathtub into this house – their kids prefer showers so they really didn’t need one, but I knew that for future resale they would need at least one bathroom with a tub. So they chose this lower one that is easy to get in and out of – not a big tub moment. I hope I’m right about this (I feel VERY confident that I am but only time will tell).

This one is small and simple – a vanity, toilet, and shower. The only thing really interesting about the layout is the relationship with the closet across the hall.

As you can see the the pocket door of the bathroom and the closet are aligned perfectly, which was an intentional choice by Annie. It’s just a nice clean flow and good sightlines.

From Max: “The goal here was to maximize the view towards the river from the tub/shower area. Even though it’s a lot of square footage, it’s a super linear series of rooms, and we needed every inch possible to fit all the things in. We had to re-route some things in that shower valve wall so there would be enough space between the shower heads and the edge of the tub. Props to Ken and Katie for really going for it in here; this is a super special bathroom layout. A lot of times when I’m designing a bathroom, there’s overkill on storage, but in this case, it’s more about keeping things open and uncluttered.”

This bathroom is likely my favorite – it’s SO PRETTY and also another one where I basically insisted they have a tub in it. In my opinion, you don’t have this house, and you certainly don’t buy this house (should they ever want to sell it) without a tub. I would never buy a house without a tub since having one – especially in the winter in PNW where it’s a 5 night a week mood-boosting before-bed routine. I really want to teach Katie the ways of the bath – and it starts with a GREAT tub (which they haven’t had before so understandably they aren’t bathers). Sound off in the comments about how important a nice bath is to you because to me it’s an absolute deal breaker.

Clearly, Max is a big old bather. Now please, if you think I did the right thing by forcing one nice bathtub (and one kids’ bathtub) into this house let us know in the comments – SUPPORT MY PRO BATHING AGENDA!! Ken and Katie are still undecided bathers which I get if you don’t have a bathtub you love and if you don’t have a bathing routine you long for every day. For me it’s 20 minutes where I get to escape in the name of “showering” and “cleaning myself” but instead I light a candle, drop in some bath oil, and read my romance novels (or scroll if I haven’t been on social for a couple of days) and then my body feels so good/clean/warm and my mood is boosted. Will you vote with me and be pro-bathtub!!!

*Photos at Kohler by Veronica Crawford
**Photos of River House by Kaitlin Green

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Lindsey
23 days ago

Bathtubs for life!

Caroline
21 days ago
Reply to  Lindsey

Bathtub for president! 🙂

Victoria
23 days ago

I wouldn’t buy a house that didn’t have a bath. A bath with a beautiful river view would be fantastic.
American baths are so funny because they’re usually only a foot tall so what you call a soaker tub is good, as long as it’s long enough to settle into. I’ll bathe for more than an hour with a book and a glass of wine.

Vera
23 days ago

I, like Katie, am not a bath person, but I so WANT to be. This would actually be a great post: “how to become a bath person.” I need someone to tell me everything, even the things that they think are too obvious/dumb to explain. My first thought is: what would I do while in there? I don’t want more screen time. I don’t want to listen to anyone talking (I need quiet to relax). And I feel like a book/magazine would get wet and would be annoying to hold up since there’s no pillow on my lap to hold it. Then there’s all the other logistics. Do you also shower first? After? What little things make the process smoother? A robe? Just please walk me through it. Also the only tub we have is a tub/shower combo shared by our family of 6 which I get isn’t ideal BUT my MIL takes a bath multiple times a week in the same situation, so I know it’s possible. Please educate me people! 😁 The layouts look great Emily 🙂 and I absolutely agree a house like this needs the two baths you put in. The sneak peak of the shower… Read more »

Julie S
23 days ago
Reply to  Vera

I have a lot of the same roadblocks! I find bathing for more than about 10 minutes becomes very boring (and I am not someone who needs constant entertainment/input at all). But a bath needs to last much longer to justify the water and the time waiting for the tub to fill up IMO. Also yes, when do you do the showering parts?? So far I do the work of washing and rinsing my hair after the relaxing bath soak, while I drain the tub. It’s kinda weird and feels off kilter! The only time taking a bath really works for me is when I am sick and a hot hot bath that makes me sweat feels good.

Cris S.
22 days ago
Reply to  Vera

I too would love a tutorial addressing all of this! And also, I used to be able to fit a long bath in every once in a while, but since starting HRT patches, I have to time baths between patch switches or they soak right off. Any one else have good ideas for dealing with that?

Katie
22 days ago
Reply to  Vera

I also need a tutorial to enjoy long baths. We installed bathtubs for our young children and they are both still regular bathers despite being easily able to take showers now. Both my sons play a lot of sport and swear by a soak with Epsom salts for recovery if they have back to back fixtures. I would love to enjoy the bath but I have a couple of deal breakers: 1. Does it wreck your nails? I get gels a few times a year and I feel they peel off in a bath. I know lots of the EHD team use gel nails as well, do you avoid long baths when you have them in? Secondly, this might just be me because I’m fat, but I feel like a kind of float to the surface? Like I have to focus on keeping my whole body submerged? Or maybe my tub isn’t deep enough lol

Michelle
22 days ago
Reply to  Katie

I get gel pedicures and find they last a couple of months. I bathe about once a week and haven’t noticed any impact on my nails. For fingers, any bending of nails underneath can start to cause the gel to split so I’d just be mindful when opening things if you’ve had them soaking for awhile. As for keeping your body in a restful position let me assure you that most people float. But if you tub it too large, or the edge is too sloped its hard to keep from laying flat out. You can embrace floating, with salts and a bath pillow that attaches to the edge and holds your head up. Or if you like the security of feeling the bottom, you can sit and not lay or simply put less water in. When I am reading or using my iPad I keep a stool near the bath and prop it so it’s not suspended over the water. But other things to do include: face and or hair masks, listen to mediation or chill music. I have two types of baths: bubble baths and functional baths. in the former, I like bubbles, I put my hair up… Read more »

Jen A
22 days ago
Reply to  Vera

My big question is how does everyone’s bath not get cold after a few minutes? It’s lovely to slip into a nice hot bath, but that water gets so cold so quickly and then it loses all the impact for me. How are you people spending an hour in there? Serious question. Maybe it is because I do not have a “good” bathtub with soaker jets and all.

Dawn
22 days ago
Reply to  Jen A

I have an acrylic tub but it’s well insulated. I also did a drop in tub in a quartz surround to add even more insulation. Holds heat well / plus you can always add a little hot water.

Michelle
22 days ago
Reply to  Jen A

yeah I feel you. Cast iron tub keep heat, fiberglass doesn’t. Not much you can do about it but take shorter baths. This is one reason hot tubs exist, although communal bathing is a whole other topic.

Molly
22 days ago
Reply to  Vera

Same roadblocks here too, plus add in the guilt and actual expense of heating all that water, only to get bored and feel it cool off in 10 mins. The brief period of my life I was into baths (someone else was paying the electric bill and this was prior to me growing a conscience for burning all that energy on something that feels frivolous) I read books which I had mentally designated as bath books, so I expected they would be damaged by drips and wet hands. So that’s my only tip – know that whatever book you read will get a bit wrecked.

Lia
22 days ago
Reply to  Vera

I’m team bath and I do not have a fancy tub (that is my dream in life). To prep for my bath (which is in the kid’s bathroom, our primary bathroom is shower only which I HATE) I do the following: -turn on my lowest level of lights. We have three different light options in our bath, and I use the one that is low and warm. If I didn’t have the option, I would bring my Himalayan salt lamp in and use that to get the right mood lighting -scoop all bath toys out of tub :/ -lock door. Critical, so children wandering around looking for a toilet or a mom don’t burst in and ruin my chill vibe. I usually bathe after they are in bed, and then leave me alone. -fill my tub as full as possible with hot water. Add bath bomb or bubble bath or scented Epsom salts while it is filling. Bubbles are my preference. Helps if you are in the tub while filling it to get depth and temp right. Fill it generously. -throw on a face mask or hair mask or both. -use a bath caddy thing that goes over the sides… Read more »

Brenna
22 days ago
Reply to  Vera

Yes! Here for all of this! I also wonder how people get the temperature right. If it’s comfortably warm when I get in, I end up hot in 5 minutes. And bored. I’d rather just get out, get dressed, and go to the couch to read a book. But so many people seem to think a bath is magical; I feel like I’m missing something.

Christina
22 days ago
Reply to  Vera

If you’re working on becoming a bath person and also renovating, I recommend having a hand shower fixture right next to the tub filling faucet. Being able to use the handheld shower to rinse my hair takes away the “do I also need a shower” question. But I also will just wash it in the tub if I’m not super grimy or sweaty.

Vera
15 days ago
Reply to  Vera

Big thank you to everyone who wrote – I have been reading all the comments and there is lots of helpful info! Please EHD make this a post where all these tips are consolidated and you gals add your own 😁

Rachel
23 days ago

Pro-bath here, but not for re-sale or even for my own use – we did them in our forever home renovation for bathing future grandchildren!

A
23 days ago

I do vote with you pro bathtub!! I agree it would be weird to see a house this nice for sale and then find out it didn’t have any bathtubs. I probably take a bath only once or twice a month but nothing feels better when you have chills from being sick or need to soothe overworked muscles or just want to have an extra luxuriant face mask.

Elizabeth
23 days ago

Another big argument for bathtubs is that any future resident of the home with little kids will definitely want a bathtub or two. Speaking as a mom with a one-year-old, I agree with Emily; I would not consider a home without a bathtub.

🥰 Rusty
23 days ago

I only have one bathroom in my almost 100 yr old house.
I’m not a frequent bather coz I don’t have the luxury of time, but my bath is cast iron and when I use it, the water stays perfectly warm for aaaaages!!!
I can’t imagine having a bath in a plastic tub.
Not a fan if doing anything other than bathing while in the bath, but all for candles instead of lighting and a big drink of water (I know, boring, but healthy).
🛀

priscilla
20 days ago
Reply to  🥰 Rusty

I’m all in on the cast iron tubs, the water stays hot forEVAH

Marie
23 days ago

Pro bathtub here! A must for small children…

Kelly
23 days ago

I can’t wait to see the finished primary bath! I’m pro bathtub and have a jetted tub which my grandchildren absolutely love, but I’d never use it everyday as it’s a tremendous waste of water as well as the energy needed to heat all that water. But at least one is a necessity for a family with little kids.

Madeline
23 days ago

@Vera re: how to make baths a thing. I do think that having a place to put a towel/book next to you is a good thing. I have a teak bath tray that sits across the width of my bathtub. (A small stool or a nearby toilet could also work). I put a hand towel there. I do think having a towel nearby helps you wipe your hands when you get wet. I always just read a book/magazine. I won’t read a library book or a super nice hardcover book, but anything else is up for grabs. If it gets wet, it usually dries out and I can still read it. I think getting in the bath once it’s filled up about halfway and then enjoying the rest of the filling process is nice. If I need a shower that day, I just shower afterwards. But sometimes I will just wash my face at the end of the bath and call it a night. Bath time is reading time for me! Such a nice way to unwind.

Emily
23 days ago

Nah. It’s too much work to clean the tub then fill it. And then hope it stays warm. And then you still need to shower. I haven’t had a bath in about 20 years. I’m good. But I hope others enjoy their baths.

abijin
23 days ago

Exploring the bathroom floor plans at River House was eye-opening. 

Evie
23 days ago

If anyone is wondering, Emily’s clothes:

  • Women’s Denim Chore Coat in Hemp Original Standard by Patagonia
  • Multi Colored Jacket in Brown/Blue by Colovos
  • Moussy Vintage jeans (possibly MV Keller Tapered in Blu)
  • Cedar Clog in Taupe Suede by Free People
Nora
22 days ago
Reply to  Evie

actually i WAS wondering… love the colovos jacket

Julie S
23 days ago

I loooove the space that the kids’ bath has and would transplant it to my home in a heartbeat! As a short girl I do prefer a low tub like that. We had a high one at our last house and it was so awkward to step in and out of, even with a grab bar. We never filled it that high for bathing either.

Megs
23 days ago

A decade ago, we bought a 1914 bungalow that had three bathrooms but no bathtub. It wasn’t a deal breaker for buying the house (we really wanted the house and were determined to make it work), but within a year, we added a bathroom with a tub. Young kids need bath time. (Some adults, too, but I’m not a bather.) 100% signing on to the pro-tub agenda.

Susan
23 days ago

Couldn’t live without my Epsom salt, lavendar oil soaks after a day of hard work. I wouldn’t even consider a house with no tub. Deal breaker for sure

Angela
23 days ago

No one in my family is a bather, either (I agree with Vera we need a Bath 101 post). But, I’m 100% behind having bathtubs in the kids’ bathroom and master bathroom. Epsom salt or apple cider vinegar soaks for ailments, soaking the couch slipcover before washing it, little kids’ bathtime–when you need a tub, you need a tub. If I were to regularly use that much water for baths though, I would want a greywater system and a drainwater heat recovery system (https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/drain-water-heat-recovery).

Sally
23 days ago

I have a bath once a year tops and get sick of it pretty quickly but all the same, I prefer to have a bath in the house, although I know many people who don’t and think they waste space. Needs to be a comfortable bath though – sometimes the flashiest looking baths aren’t that comfortable and you can’t recline. I also INFINITELY prefer built-in baths to freestanding – so much easier to keep clean and just more streamlined. And usually more space for cup of tea etc.
Totally different subject but it intrigues me no end that so many American houses seem to be made of thin inner walls. I notice it when they do makeover demos – they just hip and shoulder through. All the houses I’ve ever lived in have had interior walls made of brick, although I think that may be changing with newer houses.
Finally, I would be very interested to understand the difference between your role and Max’s, and how that works, and if it ever gets tense.
Looking forward to the final reveals.

Sheila
23 days ago

I agree that in a house with this many bathrooms, it’s wise to have a bathtub in the house for little kid baths. I’ve never had a deep, luxurious soaking tub and maybe it’s great but here in SoCal, that’s a moot point because they waste too much water.

Sally
22 days ago
Reply to  Sheila

That’s not necessarily the case – depends on a few factors, including how long the shower is. Long showers could fill multiple baths. If you ever take a shower in a combined bath/shower and put the plug in, you can see how quickly the water fills up. Would be worth checking how much water a standard 4 min shower collects.
https://www.watercorporation.com.au/Help-and-advice/Waterwise/Bathroom/Saving-water-during-shower-time#:~:text=It's%20not%20uncommon%20to%20think,how%20long%20you%20shower%20for.

Marisa
23 days ago

Okay I don’t say this to be critical but out of genuine curiosity, what is your water bill like after taking a bath in a deep tub every day? In my house we have three people taking a short shower every day and in Portland and our water bill is astronomical. In the summer when we’re watering a small garden it can be $200/month! So if we had a really big tub we used regularly I can’t even imagine.

Kate
22 days ago

Wow, that river view from the primary bath is awesome.
I love a good tub! I have a deep one with jets that is a major upgrade from the low-walled tub in my old New England Cape. I never understood why the wall was so low. I guess it was good for bathing kids (less to lean/reach over) but for actually taking a bath, I need depth!

Elise
22 days ago

Agreed, a house needs at least one bath for bathing small children. As far as taking baths, I have not taken a bath as an adult in decades. Shower all the way!

Amber
22 days ago

Maybe you’re saving it for another post, but I’d love to hear more about the primary bath’s wet room. How does the door to the balcony work? Are you concerned about it getting cold?

Dree
22 days ago
Reply to  Amber

Yes, I’ve only used this once in a hotel in New Orleans (see attached pic). It was gorgeous but freezing cold because it was November, had a super high ceiling and a gigantic window. Anyone else have experience?

IMG_6109
Kirsten
22 days ago

Not a tub person. We made sure to have one bath tub for our kids, but our primary bath doesn’t have one and doesn’t have space to add one. In our previous house we had a “garden tub” that wouldn’t fully submerge you, I just didn’t find it enjoyable. However, if we had the space and money…. I would probably do it for resale, we are more focused on getting as many projects done with our budget and *fingers crossed* getting a pool/hot tub (Florida gal, with all the nice weather to get maximized usage).

MBJ
22 days ago

100% agree with your pro-bath agenda for relaxing mom bathing and just for resale, as you mention. Anyone planning to have a family or that already has young kids would be kind of excluded from purchasing this GORGEOUS place if you didn’t have the baths. That river view from the primary bath is simply dreamy. Thanks for sharing!

Donna J
22 days ago
Reply to  MBJ

I love a baths- though I take them rarely – and I have a question about these small toilet only enclosures- some of them seem to lack windows? In the master? am I just reading these plans wrong? I really like a window in my toilet room both for ventilation and inspiring views. And the amazing shower balcony seems amazing… I’d like to hear more about these two things …

Heidi
22 days ago

I just posed this question to my realtor. He says that 95% of his buyers don’t care, and the other 5% care A LOT. These are typically buyers with young children. With that in mind, and also knowing that our house due to the price range and location is not going to be attractive to most young families, we are going the direction of aging in place, gutting our bathroom in favor of a low threshold walk in shower with grab bars. We are also adding a saltwater hot tub outdoors, which will likely, hopefully(?) get more use than an indoor tub. Time will tell. Thanks for the timely discussion of bathroom layouts.

Zerka NZ
22 days ago
Reply to  Heidi

No bath would be a deal breaker for me UNLESS there was a gorgeous sounding saltwater hot tub outside. Jealous much.

Roberta Davis
22 days ago

These are all great layouts and I am pro-bathtub! If you have room, a soaking tub is such a luxury and I agree it’s a mood-booster and also is better for soaking dry skin in the winter than a shower is! And if you have small kids, you need a bathtub. I know they don’t have small kids, but the next residents very well could, or guests could have small kids who need a bath. The only thing I don’t like about huge bathtubs is trying to clean them. Anyone have any tips? I have short arms!

Roberta Whitmer
22 days ago

I would be extremely happy to buy a home with NO bathtubs at all. And although it is nice that you enjoy them, I have zero interest in taking even a single bath to appease proponents. My young children would happily play in a bucket of water or a rubber tote set inside a walk in shower. But after soaking in the river for fun, a quick shampoo and rinse is likely sufficient to cleanse the kids.

Dash
22 days ago

I have relatives who moved into a house without a bathtub with two small kids and a baby. The kids did in fact use a Rubbermaid bin in the shower; they considered renovating but moved instead.

Jen A
22 days ago

Even though I rarely take a bath, I think it is great to have at least one in the house. There are just some occasions where you need it, even for things like after a big workout at the end of a shower filling it with cold water to soak your legs, or like another poster mentioned soaking something big or whatever.

Probably a tub in the kids bath makes the most sense. The primary bath I might be inclined to mainly want a walk in shower for help with aging, and the bath less of a priority. But definitely need one bath in the house. Also, if this is a river/party house, just having that to hose off small children after a day of playing is nice, even if they are not overnight guests.

Ann
22 days ago

I agree that a house needs at least one bathtub, but I draw the line at a fancy one that sits on its own with no way to protect yourself from drafts. We used to have a large Jacuzzi that looked fantastic with a skylight above it, a window beside it, and a large, spacious room around it. We used it a few times but found we FROZE in drafts. To make it cozy and draft-free, we’d have had to install a surrounding curtain or wall. A shower/tub combo with a curtain gets my vote!

Julia
22 days ago

I wouldn’t buy a house without a shower on the main floor. Setting aside all “aging in place” considerations (which is A PRETTY BIG THING to set aside, frankly), there can be times when even young, healthy people might have trouble navigating stairs—say, one of their kids gets a serious broken leg—or you might have an older relative staying with you while they recuperate from an injury. I’m assuming you could use the office as a temporary bedroom, but having a way to shower on the ground floor is VITAL, in my opinion.

Jen
22 days ago
Reply to  Julia

This is a very good point!

Maryellen
22 days ago

Yes to bathtubs! Our current home doesn’t have a tub in the primary bath and I miss it every day. The previous owners had just renovated it before we bought the house so I can’t justify re-doing that bathroom. In our last house, I had a wonderful soaking tub and used it often. Now, when I get really desperate for a soak, I have to use one of the kids alcove tubs.

erin
22 days ago

Love these posts discussing the floor plan choices.! I have found a strong correlation between height and tub use. if you are over 5’6″ most tubs are uncomfortable. Not being able to stretch out in the tub makes a huge difference on body temperature. Emily- looks like the homeowners are quite a bit taller than you, likely contributing to their aversion to using the tub.

Cici Haus
22 days ago

We didn’t buy a house because it didn’t have a bathtub on the same floor as the kids’ rooms. I was pregnant at the time and planning to have a second so we were looking at at least 7 years of hauling one or two kids to a different floor for a bath. Not happening. Also, I have a GIGANTIC 1990s tub and I love it with all of my heart. I call it my “indoor hot tub.” I’m not exaggerating when I saw it’s huge. We’ve had four adult women sit in it comfortably for an at-home spa day (we also have a sauna).

Donna J
22 days ago
Reply to  Cici Haus

Love that for you! Home sauna is a major life goal for me !

100% Team Bathtub
22 days ago

I would never buy a house without a bathtub and if it didn’t have one I would put one in immediately. Taking a bath is one of the greatest easy luxuries in life! I would take a bath over showering 99.8% of the time!!! And yes I am an adult 🙂

Camille Toschi
22 days ago

I am 100% pro-bathtub and always have been. My dad was redoing his guest bathroom a few years ago and took out the shower tub and replaced it with a walk-in shower and to this day, I tell him it’s the biggest mistake he made in his house. A guest (ME once I moved out) does not want to have to ask to use her dad’s bathtub. I’m also anti large bathroom in general because I love cozy spaces and taking a bath in a smaller room feels so much more relaxing and warm.

Lynn
22 days ago

I wish you would include grab bar options. As the homeowners age or have injuries and for guests with needs this should be standard in new construction and in renovations.

B
22 days ago

A tub with a heated backrest is…. bliss. That is all.

Barbara at Mantel and Table
22 days ago

Ha! I’m TOTALLY on TEAM BATHTUB!! I’d even go so far as to say jets need to be included in the primary! Ahh the luxury! A deal-breaker for me too. Thanks for the details on this – I love to see how the rooms are put together.

Anna K
22 days ago

Admittedly not a bath person. I have all issues mentioned in the comments; I get bored, float and worst of all the water gets cold! But I can appreciate the ritual as I sauna most nights. I think the tub in the kids bath is great but would always chose a sauna of steam room instead of a tub in the primary bath.

Trisha
22 days ago

100,000% bathtubs! For all the reasons you said. Do you have any soaker tubs you recommend? I’m building and need a great one.

Hana
22 days ago

I’m a pro sauna person. Twice a week I wander to the back of our property in the woods to lounge in the 200 degree warmth and then slip into a cold plunge for as long as I can stand. I do this on repeat for about an hour. Then rinse off and sit by the fire until I cool off. I live in the PNW and only have baths rarely as I find they don’t relax my the way a Finnish sauna does. Herbal oils in the water bucket for steam is a truly wonderful sensory experience too. If I didn’t have the space for a sauna I’d probably bathe more. Not having either on would be a deal breaker.

Christina
22 days ago

Off topic, sorry. Can you give an update on your Soake pool so far considering winter use, heating costs, etc. We are looking at getting one (marked that we heard about it from you, so hopefully you get some kickback). Also wondering if you have any discount code…. every bit helps! 🙂

Christina
22 days ago

And I forgot to add, it is a must to have at least one bathtub in a home. Built ours 8 years ago and put one in basement near the guest room so babies/toddlers can use. We are jacuzzi people, but my friend has a Japanese soaker tub and swears by it. I would probably love that if I had it as an option.

KL
22 days ago

I’m a huge soaker tub person and agree that this high-end home would feel weird without one in the primary bath. The kids’ bath is also a good choice for resale, although in my own home I opted not to put one in — our layout isn’t great for parents with small children anyway for other non-changeable reasons.

Christina
22 days ago

I mostly prefer showers to baths, but I still think you made the right call for resale value. I hope Katie and Ken enjoy it once they have it! My husband almost never showers/almost always bathes and whenever we are house hunting having a decent bath in the primary bath is a make or break feature. When our kids were little a bath in their bathroom was a must have too.

Holly
22 days ago

I can’t live without a bathtub, my kids bathroom only has a shower, they are alway coming upstairs to use the primary bathroom’s bathtub. Pro bathtub.

Michelle
22 days ago

Yes, yes, yes to the wonders of the bath! When I need a reset, once or twice a week, I take a bath and feel like new. People seem to be either hot or cold about baths, but no bather would buy a house without one. My current house only has a garden tub, and while I wish it were larger and prettier, I’m so grateful I can submerge myself. Anything will do!

Caitlin
22 days ago

Team Bath 4LYF!!!

Briana
22 days ago

I don’t have strong feelings about bathtub vs shower but it’s a killer for me not to have a bedroom on the first floor of the house. We built our forever house 3 years ago and have first floor bedroom, bathroom and laundry. The passways are big enough for wheelchairs. The hope is that we can age in place and injury/illness won’t force us to move.